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Shay Shmeltzer

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Tips and information about Oracle JDeveloper and Oracle ADF
Updated: 7 hours 45 min ago

Doughnut Chart - a Yummy Addition to Oracle ADF Faces

Mon, 2015-11-23 02:16

Another new feature in Oracle ADF 12.2.1 is the new Doughnut Chart capability.

It looks like this:

When I first tried to create this one, I couldn't find the option for doughnut chart in the JDeveloper wizard.

Then I was told that a doughnut is just a pie with a hole in the center - so you actually just need to create a pie chart, and then specify some properties.

And indeed, if you'll look at the property inspector for pie charts you'll see a few new properties you can leverage. 

For example there is the InnerRadius property - that expects a value between 1 and 0 - this controls how big is the hole in your doughnut.

Another nice capability is the you can put some filling in your doughnut - basically put some text that will go in the middle empty area. You do this by using centerLabel property. In the example above I used the center of the doughnut to report the total salary of a department - using a groovy sum expression in the Departments ViewObject - learn how here.

(Don't forget to use the centerLabelStyle property to assign it a bigger font - a best practice from the Oracle Alta UI book).

Here is the code from the JSF page:

<dvt:pieChart selectionListener="#{bindings.EmployeesView4.collectionModel.makeCurrent}"
   dataSelection="single" id="pieChart1" var="row"
   centerLabel="Total Salary: #{bindings.SumSalary.inputValue}" innerRadius="0.7"
   centerLabelStyle="font-size:large;" title="Salary BreakDown" 
         <dvt:chartLegend id="cl1" position="bottom"/>
         <dvt:pieDataItem id="di1" label="#{row.LastName}" value="#{row.Salary}"/>

Try it out - it's a yummy new addition to Oracle's set of bakery based charts. 

Categories: Development

Enabling CORS for ADF Business Component REST Services

Fri, 2015-11-20 05:12

CORS (which stands for Cross-Origin Resource Sharing) is a setting that will enable your REST services running on one server to be invoked from applications running on another server.

I first encountered this when I was trying to run an Oracle JET project in my NetBeans IDE that will access a set of REST services I exposed using Oracle ADF Business Component in my JDeveloper environment. Since NetBeans runs the HTML on a GlassFish instance, while JDeveloper ran the ADF BC layer on a WebLogic instance I got the dreaded No 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header is present error:

 XMLHttpRequest cannot load No 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header is present on the requested resource. Origin 'http://localhost:8383' is therefore not allowed access.

There is no built-in functionality to enable CORS for ADF BC in JDeveloper, but I found it very easy to leverage the CORS Filter libraries to do this. All you need to do is add the two JAR files it provides to your project and configure the web.xml to support the filter and the specific REST operations you want to enable CORS for.

Here is a quick video showing you the complete setup (using the REST ADF BC project created here).

The web.xml addition is:

                <param-value>GET, POST, HEAD, PUT, PATCH, DELETE</param-value>

If you follow my approach in the video and add the JARs as a new user library to JDeveloper and don't forget to check the "Deploy by Default" check box for the library.

Categories: Development

Remote TaskFlows/Remote Region - For Advanced Reusability in Oracle ADF

Tue, 2015-11-17 17:56

A new feature in Oracle ADF 12.2.1 is Remote TaskFlows (or Remote Regions) - this allows one application to have regions inside it that are populated from taskflows that are running as part of another application.

Initially some of you might be a bit confused - "wasn't this something that we were able to do with ADF libraries already? We could just package a taskflow from one app as an ADF library and use that library in the other application".

The slight distinction here is that the library approach had the taskflow running as part of your consuming application. Remote task flows on the other hand have the taskflow running as part of the other application and don't require the creation of a library. As a result they also don't require an ADF library update when the taskflow changes- the minute the changes are deployed on the remote server, your application will get the new version. 

One way of thinking about remote taskflows is as adding a "portal" like functionality to your ADF app - allowing one app to display parts of another app leveraging the other app resources for executing any logic. 

Here is a quick video demoing how to configure and run this.

The URLs you'll need for creating the remote region resource connection are:




Note that there are some limitation on the type and functionality of taskflows that can be exposed as remote taskflows. And there are other things to consider such as security and session timeout settings. So have a read through the remote region documentation before you start leveraging this feature.

A couple of notes.

1. In the currently available 12.2.1 version of JDeveloper from OTN, there is a slight bug that will prevent you from creating the connection to the remote task flow - there is a patch available for this from Oracle Support - request the patch for bug 22132843 or 22093099.

2. At my OOW session about new features I mentioned that remote task flows are loaded in parallel, that is actually still not the case, while we started work on this capability - it didn't made it into 12.2.1. So remote task flows behave like other task flows and load in sequential way right now. 

Categories: Development

REST based CRUD with Oracle ADF Business Components

Mon, 2015-11-16 12:17

A key new feature in Oracle ADF 12.2.1 is the ability to expose ADF Business Components through REST/JSON interfaces.

REST/JSON is the preferred interface for many client side UI technologies to access remote backend services - as examples both Oracle JET and Oracle MAF leverage REST as the way to access data from remote servers. 

Oracle ADF makes it very simple to expose your existing business components as REST services - all through a declarative set of dialogs.

Once you published the service interface for a view object, you should be able to do the full set of CRUD operation on that object through different REST action:

GET - will do a Read

POST - will do a Create

PATCH - will do an Update

DELETE - will do a Developer

One thing that you'll want to verify is that when you are passing JSON data back into the REST interface you specify in the header that:

Content-Type is application/

otherwise you'll get an error along the lines of: The content type is not a ADFm REST entity. Content-Type: text/plain 

In the video below I show very quickly how to expose a REST interface and then how to invoke all the CRUD operations directly from the chrome app "Postman". 

These new feature can make your Oracle ADF business services part of any new application that prefers to use REST/JavaScript/HTML5 type of architecture.

Read more about exposing Oracle ADF BC as REST in the documentation

Categories: Development

Responsive UI in Oracle ADF 12.2.1 with the MatchMediaBehavior Tag

Tue, 2015-10-27 07:42

Another very powerful addition to the responsive capabilities of ADF Faces in version 12.2.1 is the new af:matchMediaBehavior tag. It allows you to control almost every bit of your UI and change properties in response to changes in the viewport size.

Check out what it can do in this video:

Note that in the mediaQuery you can use other type of CSS media queries

The code for the page in the demo is

       <af:panelSplitter id="ps1" orientation="horizontal" splitterPosition="201">
                <f:facet name="first">
                    <af:panelFormLayout id="pfl1" labelAlignment="start">
                        <af:matchMediaBehavior matchedPropertyValue="top" propertyName="labelAlignment"
                                               mediaQuery="screen and (max-width: 768px)"/>
                        <af:inputText label="Label 1" id="it1"/>
                        <af:inputText label="Label 2" id="it2"/>
                        <f:facet name="footer"/>
                <f:facet name="second">
                    <af:panelFormLayout id="pfl2" labelAlignment="start" rows="2">
                        <af:matchMediaBehavior matchedPropertyValue="top" propertyName="labelAlignment"
                                               mediaQuery="screen and (max-width: 900px)"/>
                        <af:matchMediaBehavior matchedPropertyValue="4" propertyName="rows"
                                               mediaQuery="screen and (max-width: 800px)"/>
                        <af:inputText label="Label 1" id="it3"/>
                        <af:inputText label="Label 2" id="it4"/>
                        <f:facet name="footer"/>
                        <af:inputListOfValues label="Label 1" popupTitle="Search and Result Dialog" id="ilov1"/>
                        <af:inputFile label="Label 1" id="if1"/>
                <af:matchMediaBehavior matchedPropertyValue="vertical" propertyName="orientation"
                                       mediaQuery="screen and (max-width: 768px)"/>
                <af:matchMediaBehavior matchedPropertyValue="100" propertyName="splitterPosition"
                                       mediaQuery="screen and (max-width: 768px)"/>
Categories: Development

Introducing the Masonry Layout in Oracle ADF 12.2.1

Fri, 2015-10-23 13:34

One of the focus areas for Oracle ADF 12.2.1 was simplifying the creation of responsive UIs, and one of the new components that supports this is the af:masonryLayout component. It allows you to define areas on your page that act as tiles and automatically re-arrange themselves to match the browser's window size.

This layout is very useful for dashboard type of pages where you are showing all sorts of information. 

In the video below I show you the very basic way to use this out of the box.

As mentioned in the video there are built in styleClasses in ADF for the size of masonry tiles.

They are in the format of AFMasonryTileSize1x1 with support for 1x2,1x3,2x1,2x2,3x1,3x2

The Masonry Layout can contain any component you want (not just group layout as shown in the page), as long as you give that component the right AFMasonryTileSize style. 

You can further control the sizing and coloring of the tiles using styleClasses that you define in a skin file.

For example in the video I used the following style to make sure you can actually see the panelGroupLayout tiles on the page. 

border: black;
border-width: 2px; 

The actual code in the JSF page is:

<af:masonryLayout id="ml1">
  <af:panelGroupLayout id="pgl1" styleClass="AFMasonryTileSize2x1 tileStyle"/>
  <af:panelGroupLayout id="pgl2" styleClass="AFMasonryTileSize2x1 tileStyle"/>
  <af:panelGroupLayout id="pgl3" styleClass="AFMasonryTileSize1x1 tileStyle"/>
  <af:panelGroupLayout id="pgl4" styleClass="AFMasonryTileSize3x1 tileStyle"/>

Categories: Development

OOW and JavaOne 2015 - Where I'll Be

Thu, 2015-10-22 09:41

It's that time of the year again, and next week is going to be crazy busy for us at Oracle OpenWorld and at JavaOne.

In case you want to catch me, here is a list of the locations where I'll be:

Building iOS Apps with Java 8 [CON1588]

Monday, Oct 26, 12:30 p.m. | Hilton—Continental Ballroom 4

Build Responsive Web Applications with Oracle ADF [HOL10380]

Monday, Oct 26, 5:00 p.m. | Hotel Nikko—Nikko Ballroom III (3rd Floor)

General Session: Revolutionizing Application Development with Oracle Cloud [GEN9500]

 Tuesday, Oct 27, 11:00 a.m. | Moscone South—103 

Meet the Experts: Oracle’s Development Tools and Frameworks [MTE10022]

Tuesday, Oct 27, 6:15 p.m. | Moscone South—300

Oracle Application Development Framework and Oracle JDeveloper—What’s New and How to Use It [CON8333]

Wednesday, Oct 28, 1:45 p.m. | Moscone South—304

Building iOS Apps with Java 8 [CON1588]

Thursday, Oct 29, 9:00 a.m. | Hilton—Continental Ballroom 1/2/3

Moving Oracle ADF to the Cloud—Development and Deployment in the New Age [CON8332]

Thursday, Oct 29, 1:15 p.m. | Moscone South—270

In between you could also catch me at the Oracle demo ground in Moscone south (mostly in the Oracle Application Builder Cloud Service), and at the JavaOne GeekBar on Monday.

At the rest of the time, I'll try and catch some of the sessions on this list.

See you there...

Categories: Development