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Kevin Closson

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Updated: 2 hours 33 min ago

When Storage is REALLY Fast Even Zero-Second Wait Events are Top 5. Disk File Operations I/O: The Mystery Wait Event.

Fri, 2014-07-18 09:37

The SLOB code that is generally available here differs significantly from what I often test with in labs. Recently I was contorting SLOB to hammer an EMC XtremIO All-Flash Array in a rather interesting way. Those of you in the ranks of the hundreds of SLOB experts out there will notice two things quickly in the following AWR snippet:

1)   Physical single block reads are being timed by the Oracle wait interface at 601 microseconds (3604/5995141 == .000601) and this is, naturally for SLOB, the top wait event.

2)   Disk file operations I/O is ranking as a top 5 timed event. This is not typical for SLOB.

 

file-io-operations

The 601us latencies for XtremIO are certainly no surprise. After all, this particular EMC storage array is an All-Flash Array so there’s no opportunity for latency to suffer as is the case with alternatives such as flash-cache approaches. So what is this blog post about? It’s about Disk file operations I/O.

I needed to refresh my memory on what the Disk file operations I/O event was all about. So, I naturally went to consult the Statistics Description documentation. Unfortunately there was no mention of the wait even there so I dug further to find it documented in the Description of Wait Events section of the Oracle Database 11g documentation which states:

This event is used to wait for disk file operations (for example, open, close, seek, and resize). It is also used for miscellaneous I/O operations such as block dumps and password file accesses.

Egad. A wait is a blocking system call. Since open(2)/close(2) and seek(2) are non-blocking on normal files I suppose I could have suffered a resize operation–but wait, this tablespace doesn’t allow autoextend.  I suppose I really shouldn’t care that much given the fact that the sum total of wait time was zero seconds. But I wanted to understand more so I sought information from the user community–a search that landed me happily at Kyle Hailey’s post on oaktableworld.com here. Kyle’s post had some scripts that looked promising for providing more information about these waits but unfortunately in my case the scripts returned no rows found.

So, at this point, I’ll have to say that the sole value of this blog post is to point out the fact that a) the Oracle documentation specifically covering statistics descriptions is not as complete as the Description of Wait Events section and b) the elusive Disk file operations I/O wait event remains, well, elusive and that this is now part I in a multi-part blog series until I learn more. I’ll set up some traces and see what’s going on. Perhaps Kyle will chime in.

 

 

 


Filed under: oracle

Interesting SLOB Use Cases – Part I. Studying ZFS Fragmentation. Introducing Bart Sjerps.

Thu, 2014-07-17 10:35

This is the first installment in a series of posts I’m launching to share interesting use cases for SLOB. I have several installments teed up but to put a spin on things I’m going to hit two birds with one stone in this installment. The first bird I’ll hit is to introduce a friend and colleague, Bart Sjerps, who I just added to my blogroll. The other bird in my cross-hairs is this interesting post Bart wrote some time back that covers a study of ZFS fragmentation using SLOB.

Bart Sjerps on ZFS Fragmentation. A SLOB study.

As always, please visit the SLOB Resources Page for SLOB kit and documentation.

 


Filed under: Silly Little Oracle Benchmark, SLOB, ZFS, ZFS Performance

EMC XtremIO – The Full-Featured All-Flash Array. Interested In Oracle Performance? See The Whitepaper.

Fri, 2014-07-11 16:32

NOTE: There’s a link to the full article at the end of this post.

I recently submitted a manuscript to the EMC XtremIO Business Unit covering some compelling lab results from testing I concluded earlier this year. I hope you’ll find the paper interesting.

There is a link to the full paper at the bottom of this block post. I’ve pasted the executive summary here:

Executive Summary

Physical I/O patterns generated by Oracle Database workloads are well understood. The predictable nature of these I/O characteristics have historically enabled platform vendors to implement widely varying I/O acceleration technologies including prefetching, coalescing transfers, tiering, caching and even I/O elimination. However, the key presumption central to all of these acceleration technologies is that there is an identifiable active data set. While it is true that Oracle Database workloads generally settle on an active data set, the active data set for a workload is seldom static—it tends to move based on easily understood factors such as data aging or business workflow (e.g., “month-end processing”) and even the data source itself. Identifying the current active data set and keeping up with movement of the active data set is complex and time consuming due to variability in workloads, workload types, and number of workloads. Storage administrators constantly chase the performance hotspots caused by the active dataset.

All-Flash Arrays (AFAs) can completely eliminate the need to identify the active dataset because of the ability of flash to service any part of a larger data set equally. But not all AFAs are created equal.

Even though numerous AFAs have come to market, obtaining the best performance required by databases is challenging. The challenge isn’t just limited to performance. Modern storage arrays offer a wide variety of features such as deduplication, snapshots, clones, thin provisioning, and replication. These features are built on top of the underlying disk management engine, and are based on the same rules and limitations favoring sequential I/O. Simply substituting flash for hard drives won’t break these features, but neither will it enhance them.

EMC has developed a new class of enterprise data storage system, XtremIO flash array, which is based entirely on flash media. XtremIO’s approach was not simply to substitute flash in an existing storage controller design or software stack, but rather to engineer an entirely new array from the ground-up to unlock flash’s full performance potential and deliver array-based capabilities that are unprecidented in the context of current storage systems.

This paper will help the reader understand Oracle Database performance bottlenecks and how XtremIO AFAs can help address such bottlenecks with its unique capability to deal with constant variance in the IO profile and load levels. We demonstrate that it takes a highly flash-optimized architecture to ensure the best Oracle Database user experience. Please read more:  Link to full paper from emc.com.


Filed under: All Flash Array, Flash Storage for Databases, oracle, Oracle I/O Performance, Oracle performance, Oracle Performnce Monitoring, Oracle SAN Topics, Oracle Storage Related Problems