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Oracle 10g New Features: Automatic SQL Tuning Process

SQL tuning is one of the challenging tasks faced by DBAs and developers. It is an interesting and creative, but at the same time, daunting task. Manual tuning of SQL statements requires a high level of expertise and experience to understand and design suitable access paths to yield better response times. It is also a time consuming process. Other challenges include periodic collection of statistics and an ever-changing workload. And in a typical application, there are just too many SQL statements to tune.

HTTP Basics, Web Server, Servlet Container and the Java Servlet API

Saikat Goswami's picture

This article tries to demystify HTTP, "servlet", "web server", "application server", "servlet container" and gives the fundamentals of the Java Servlet API (that comes with the J2EE SDK).

Oracle 10g New Features: Easy Management

This article focuses on the new features aimed at database management. Self-management, or easy management, has been the key word for Oracle 10g. The main areas of enhancements are:

  • Self-Managing Database
  • Simplified Configuration of Shared Servers
  • Transaction Manageability
  • Simplified Statistics Collection
  • Extended Support for FGA (Fine Grain Audit)
  • Response File Creation during database install

Watching Your users' every move: All about SQL Tracing

One of the most important responsibilities of an Oracle Database Administrator or Performance Analyst, when it comes to performance diagnostics, is to determine how users access the database. This article is an attempt to show the different ways one can activate tracing of an Oracle session for performance diagnostics. While the Oracle documentation mentions some of the methods, it doesn't cover them all. This article consolidates many methods of tracing an Oracle session, some of which are well documented, as well as methods that are undocumented and reserved.

Hypercharging Oracle Data Loading

Donald K. Burleson's picture

Is there any limit to the speed of Oracle? With Oracle announcing a new record one million transactions per minute, many believe that there is nothing that Oracle cannot do.

However, what if we have a requirement for a system that must accept high-volume data loads into a single table:

  • 500,000 rows per second
  • 50 megabytes per second

Is this possible? Using the right tricks you can make Oracle load data at unbelievable speed. However, special knowledge and tricks are required.

Understanding Struts Custom Tags

Saikat Goswami's picture

If you write Java Server Pages, this article tries to bring together the pieces you need to know to write 'presentation logic'. This article is about custom tags, how to develop them and how to make maximum use of them. This article is also about tag libraries that come with Struts. What is covered is: what is a tag; what is a 'custom' tag; how you can build one; how they make life easier; and how Struts comes with tag libraries for developers to indulge.

Oracle SQL tuning with parameters

Donald K. Burleson's picture

While all SQL tuning professionals advocate tuning each individual SQL statement to reduce logical I/O, there are many cases where you do not have the luxury of tuning each-and-every SQL statement in an application. In these cases, the best you can hope to do is adjust the global optimizer parameters to optimizer as many SQL statements as possible.

Understanding Shared Memory and Semaphores

by Nidhi Jain

Shared memory and semaphores are two important resources for an Oracle instance on Unix. An instance cannot start if it is unable to allocate what it needs.

Oracle Database renamed to Oracle10G

Oracle Corporation renamed the latest version of their database management system from Oracle 10i to Oracle10G to illustrate their commitment to Grid computing and the GGG (Great Global Grid). Oracle's Chairman and CEO, Larry Ellison, will release Oracle10G at the OracleWorld conference in San Francisco on the 9th of September 2003.

Oracle9i New Feature: Oracle Managed Files

Oracle Managed Files (OMF), a new feature introduced in Oracle9i, enables the Oracle Server to automatically create and delete database files using standard operating system interfaces. This
feature hugely simplifies the job of the DBA, as the DBA doesn't need to interact with the underlying operating system to create and delete files.