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RDBMS Server

Oracle RDBMS Server Articles

Automatic Work Load Management and High Availability

Automatic Work Load Management

Application workloads can be defined as services so that they can be individually managed and controlled.
We can control and monitor which processing resources are allocated to each service during both normal operations and in response to failures.
Performance metrics are tracked by service and thresholds set to automatically generate alerts should these thresholds be crossed.
CPU resource allocations and resource consumption controls are managed for services using Resource Manager.
we deifne rules to automatically allocate processing resources to services. Oracle RAC 10g instances can be allocated to process individual services or multiple services as needed.

Getting information about previously run commands with statspack

cbruhn2's picture


When you setup statspack with level 6 you can have information on the sql_plan associated with a sql. (statpack on oracle db version >=9i)

"Fixing" SYS for hacking purposes

How does one change Oracle's SYS password without having to login into the database? Is it possible?
The answer is, YES! All you need is a binary fiile editor and some knowledge of Oracle's internals.

This document is to be used only for testing purposes and should not be used in a production environment. The purpose is to show the audience how hackers can gain access to your system without knowing it - and how to prevent it.

How to avoid primary key collision on multiple sites?

This article provides several comparative methods to avoid primary key conflicts across multiple sites.

Enabling plan_sql from statspack

cbruhn2's picture


When you setup statspack with level 6 you can have information on the sql_plan associated with a sql.

Understanding Indexes

Of iPods and Indexes

I'm not really an "early-adopter" of technology. Don't get me wrong; I love it, I just don't want to feed the addiction. When I do get a new piece of technology though, it's like a fever; I can't concentrate on anything until I've read the manual from cover to cover and found out everything it can do, every built-in gizmo, and every trashy piece of after-market merchandise that can be plugged into it.

And I don't think I'm alone here.

Yet another alert log puzzle

A handy alert log is invaluable for troubleshooting database problems. A RAC database has multiple alert logs.
I prefer to monitor them through a single table.

"A master failing to make an entry in the vessel's official
logbook as required by this part is liable to the Government for a
civil penalty of $200.

United States Code. Title 46 - Shipping. Subtitle II -Vessels and seamen, Part G - Merchant seamen protection and relief. Chapter 1113 -Official logbooks.

How meticulously do you keep your book log, Captain?
Luckily for us, our databases are as much ships as they are first mates. They are intelligent enough to keep their own records. And those logs are as important as vessel logs of the past, because the information carried by an early 21st century database could be easily worth more than 1450 tons of tea carried by Cutty Sark in 1870 en route from Shanghai to London.

As Oracle does all the mundane work, our role becomes more creative - to inspect and properly use the gathered information.

Experimenting with the continous mining

cbruhn2's picture

Today I have been experimenting with the new feature of continous mining with logmnr.

My setup

  • Oracle Database 10g Enterprise Edition Release - Production With the Partitioning, OLAP and Data Mining options
  • ALTER DATABASE ADD SUPPLEMENTAL LOG DATA or we don't see the funny things in the redologfiles
I now starts the logminer session in one window with :
dbms_Logmnr.Start_Logmnr(StartTime => SYSDATE - 1 / 24, Options => dbms_Logmnr.dict_From_OnLine_Catalog + dbms_Logmnr.Continuous_Mine);

FROM v$Logmnr_Logs;

Strange behavior from resetlogs.

cbruhn2's picture

During a test of some backup setup with rman I ran into problem running the restore / recover command.

Securing Your Database: A simple Brute Force Blocker

Natalka Roshak's picture

If you've had to change a Unix password, you know that most systems won't let you use just anything as a password - your password must be a minimum length, and must not be too easy to guess or brute-force. Oracle doesn't come with this capability installed out of the box, but Oracle 8 and above let DBAs define a custom function to complexity-check user passwords. Oracle provides a default password verification function to do some basic checking, although DBAs need to know about it and install it manually.