Skip navigation.

Feed aggregator

Oracle Apps DBA Training : How to become Apps (R12.2) DBA Part III : Patching : ADOP

Online Apps DBA - Thu, 2015-08-06 13:51

ApspDBA_onlinePatching

 

This is third part in series How to become Oracle Apps DBA from our Oracle Apps DBA (R12.2) Training (next batch starts on 8th Aug and only 1 seat left, Registration closes in 72 hours). After Architecture and Installation of Oracle E-Business Suite (R12.2) next topic you should learn in Oracle Apps DBA Training is Patching.

There are major changes around Patching in Oracle EBS 12.2 so if you are an Apps DBA working on R12 or 11i then pay special attention to this topic.

Here are some of the key points we are going to cover in Apps DBA Training

  • Type of Patches in Oracle EBS
  • Two files system (fs1 & fs2) in EBS 12.2 to support Online Patching
  • Edition Based Redefinitions – EBR
  • Version editions during patching – Run, Patch, Old
  • ADOP – New Patching Tool in EBS 12.2
  • Patching Phases in 12.2 : Prepare, Apply, Finalize, Cutover, Cleanup
  • Useful notes related to Online Patching
  • Lab Exercises where you’ll apply patches on EBS 12.2 installed by you on previous day.

Register for Oracle E-Business Suite Apps (R12.2) DBA Training (Only 1 seat left before we close registration so Hurry Up to avoid disappointment).

Previous in series Related Posts for 12.2 New Features
  1. ADOP : Online Patching in Oracle Apps (E-Business Suite) R12 12.2 : Apps DBA’s Must Read
  2. How to become/learn Oracle Apps DBA R12.2 : Part I
  3. Oracle Apps DBA Training : How to become Apps (R12) DBA Part II : Installation
  4. Oracle Apps DBA Training : How to become Apps (R12.2) DBA Part III : Patching : ADOP

The post Oracle Apps DBA Training : How to become Apps (R12.2) DBA Part III : Patching : ADOP appeared first on Oracle : Design, Implement & Maintain.

Categories: APPS Blogs

OTN Tour of Latin America 2015 : AROUG, Argentina – Day 2

Tim Hall - Thu, 2015-08-06 13:26

I mentioned in the previous post we were spending the day sightseeing today. Last time I was in Buenos Aires I did a bus tour. You can see some of the photos here.

This time Debra, Mike, Cindy and I went on a private tour in a minibus. I took the GoPro with me, so I’ve got a bunch of super wide angle photos (here). I’m sure anyone who does photography will laugh at them, but they look fine to me, so long as you look at them on a large screen. :)

It was a really nice day. We got back early, so Mike could go back to the conference to do his final session. Debra, Cindy and I spent the rest of the day chilling in the executive lounge at the Hilton, taking advantage of the free internet. It’s good when you are with people to have a good honors (not honours) status! :)

We were there for a few hours, but at about 20:00 we headed off for the airport. Debra also gets access to the lounge at the airport, so we spent 25 minutes there before heading for the plane.

I’ve already posted all my thank you messages, but once again, thanks Argentina! I hope to see you soon!

On the flight I watched Project Almanac, which was kind-of predictable, but good. After a little over two hours we were in Sau Paulo. Last time I came to Sau Paulo the taxi ride to the hotel was very slow as the traffic was a nightmare. Travelling at 02:00 meant the roads were quiet and we breezed through to the hotel. I was in bed by 03:00. :)

Cheers

Tim…

OTN Tour of Latin America 2015 : AROUG, Argentina – Day 2 was first posted on August 6, 2015 at 8:26 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Do you need to know about EMD – Earnest Money Deposit in Oracle Sourcing

OracleApps Epicenter - Thu, 2015-08-06 08:39
Do you know , Earnest Money Deposit (EMD) is a payment/deposit that suppliers are required to make to a buying organization in order to be eligible to participate in a Sourcing negotiation. EMD is very common in Public Sector companies and Government organizations and in certain global markets, particularly in APAC and EMEA. The EMD […]
Categories: APPS Blogs

Oracle Documents Cloud Service R4: Why You Should Seriously Consider It for Your Enterprise.

WebCenter Team - Thu, 2015-08-06 08:26

by: Vikas Saini, Enterprise Architect, Digital Experience and Mobile, Oracle

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";}

With the release of the latest features in Oracle Documents Cloud Service last month, Oracle has taken a giant leap forward in the file sync and content collaboration space, especially as it relates to business content sharing use cases.

Since it was first commercially made available in October 2014, Oracle Documents Cloud Service (OracleDOCS) has continued to add new features to its offering and is slowing becoming the industry leader in this space.

Among the many new capabilities, one that stands out most is the integration with Oracle Mobile Security Suite for the advanced security and control features. Now businesses can use this service to boost productivity while still providing the necessary controls that IT requires.

Here are five key reasons why you should seriously look at Oracle Documents Cloud Service for your enterprise file sync and content collaboration needs.

  1. Improved User Experience: The solution has added many new usability features to make it easier for users to review content, especially for the mobile apps. There is now a mobile Presenter that allows users to view many different file format without the need for 3rd party viewer. iPad users can now present curated content for a visually stunning impact. For iOS, the mobile app now supports Touch ID. Furthermore, if the users are using an Android phone, they can use the Android office applications to edit certain file formats stored in OracleDOCS directly.
  2. Advanced Security Capabilities: The new superior security capabilities are probably one of the most important features of the new release, in my opinion. Administrators can now mandate virus scanning for all files that are uploaded. Integration with Oracle Mobile Security Suite allows mobile  users to have OracleDOCS as part of mobile apps with added security features. This ensures that the content files can be made available offline on the mobile app and are fully encrypted. Oracle Mobile Security Suite also supports encryption of information during transit.
  3. Integration with other Cloud and On-Premise solutions: Documents Cloud Service supports REST APIs that can be used for accessing its features. The solution also provides an embeddable file picker for use with other applications. A sample integration between Siebel CRM and OracleDOCS is shown here. As more features become available via the REST API and the product integration capabilities become more mature, it will allow for various applications to integrate with OracleDOCS even more easily than what it is today (which is fairly comprehensive, btw). 
  4. Built on Oracle Infrastructure: The fact that the solution is deployed on Oracle Cloud platform, ensures that not only will it be a reliable service for mission-critical requirements but also provide the security and performance that the users expect from such a solution. 
  5. Betting on Oracle’s Cloud Vision: Lastly, in recent times the cloud platform has become a strategic focus for Oracle and already its services are providing improved productivity for many corporate users. Since, one of the goals for Oracle is to ensure that these services are integrated with each other wherever it makes sense, the customers will get added benefits from not having to spend resources on silo-ed solutions. In addition, Oracle has been a leader with the on-premise Enterprise Content Management Platform solution and can bring the years of experience from that to improve the OracleDOCS solution much quicker than the competitors.

Summary:
A key part of Oracle’s strategy moving forward is its focus on the Oracle Cloud Platform. The big advantage that the company has over its competitors is the holistic solution it can provide across a company's complete IT architecture, given its vast portfolio of products. In a short span, the company has released solutions for software-as-a-service (SaaS), platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and Infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). It recently announced the launch of about 24 more services including Oracle Mobile Cloud, Oracle Integration Cloud and Oracle Process Cloud.

In addition, given the tremendous success of Oracle's on-premise Enterprise Content Management Platform over past many years, it is probably safe to assume that the product management understands the space very well and knows the key features that businesses are looking for in a cloud collaboration solution.

For business users, Oracle Documents Cloud is a great service as it provides capabilities for content collaboration and privacy control. I believe that Oracle will continue to make great strides in the space by adding new and innovative features to this service and will soon be a leader of the next generation of Enterprise Content Management (ECM) in the cloud.

Here you will find more information about Oracle Documents Cloud Service.

Related Links:
Document Cloud Service Videos
Oracle Extends World’s Most Comprehensive Enterprise Cloud Portfolio

Visitas estudiantiles a Oracle MDC

Usable Apps - Thu, 2015-08-06 07:17

Sarahi Mireles (@sarahimireles), User Experience Developer, nos cuenta de la reciente visita del Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Zamora para conocer el Centro de desarrollo de Oracle en México (MDC), como parte de un programa de Oracle MDC para estudiantes de TI.

Sarahi and Karina at the Event in MDC

Sarahi con Karina Nava (Database developer) explican algunas de las áreas donde los estudiantes de TI pueden desarrollar su carrera en Oracle

Cada semestre en Oracle Mexico Development Center (A.K.A. MDC) le damos la bienvenida a cientos de estudiantes del área de Telecomunicaciones e Informática como una oportunidad de conocer el centro de desarrollo y las distintas áreas en las que Oracle es líder en el mercado.

Students learn about the important role of Oracle MDC and IT

Estudiantes aprenden acerca del importante rol de Oracle MDC en el desarrollo de nuevas tecnologías y el trabajo que ahí se hace.

Estudiantes de diferentes universidades de todo el país han llegado para conocer más sobre Oracle y cómo estamos revolucionando no sólo nuestro país sino el mundo con las nuevas tecnologías de información. Junto con otros compañeros, yo soy parte del equipo que recibe a estos estudiantes y les damos una charla corta y divertida sobre qué es Oracle, cómo está impactando las tecnologías de manera global, porqué México para un centro de desarrollo, qué hacemos aquí, cómo es nuestro ambiente de trabajo y lo increíble que es trabajar para una empresa de nivel y reconocimiento internacional.

Students gather on the balcony at MDC for a group photograph

Los estudiantes de las distintas universidades toman un pequeño recorrido por las instalaciones de Oracle MDC. Aquí, los estudiantes en uno de los balcones.

Te gusta la idea de visitarnos y eres estudiante o maestro del ramo de Tecnologías de Información? Ponte en contacto con Laura Ramos o para conocer los detalles y programar una visita.

Flying Monkeys! Fun at work with UX. What's on your desk?

Oracle Applications User Experience mezclando la diversión y el trabajo en la nube!

Puedes leer más acerca de Oracle MDC en nuestra página de Facebook y conocer más acerca del equipo Oracle Applications User Experience en el website de Usable Apps.

Tabs Layout Support in Alta UI Tablet First Template

Andrejus Baranovski - Thu, 2015-08-06 07:02
Tablet First Template in ADF 12c is ideal for both tablet and desktop. Combined with Alta UI layout, it offers light and responsive UI experience to the end users. I'm going to describe in this post, how to use ADF Faces Tabs with Alta UI in Table First template. I will show ADF regions are friendly with Web like UI design, without internal scrollbars in the page.

Page can be created referencing Tablet First template with JDeveloper wizard, same as we would use it to create page based on UI Shell template:


Table First template provides multiple facets, Central facet is supposed to contain main content. I'm going to include two ADF Faces UI tab components into central facet. Both tabs will render ADF regions:


Unfortunately it doesn't work properly. Tabs are rendered in the centre of the page:


Luckily there is a fix. We should apply special CSS style class, provided with Oracle WorkBetter Alta UI application - ContentContainerWorkaround. This class must be set for ADF Faces UI panel tabbed component:


After CSS style class fix is applied, tabs are rendered correctly:


I have implemented second tab - Employees Table to test how large ADF UI table renders in Tablet First Template. Table is set with page scroll policy:


ADF region renders table without internal scrollbar, it looks Web style alike:


There are more rows, than can fit into screen. User can scroll down entire page to see the remaining rows. This is especially good for tablet screens, ADF provides really good UI experience:


Download sample application - ADFAltaApp_v2.zip.

OTN Tour of Latin America 2015 : AROUG, Argentina – Day 1

Tim Hall - Thu, 2015-08-06 06:39

I woke up far too early and spent a few hours on the computer.

A number of folks on the tour have built up so many Hilton Honours points they get access to the executive lounge, so I was signed in as a scummy guest and I got breakfast for free. :)

At about 09:00 we walked across to the AROUG event, which had the following order of events.

  • The day started with an introduction to OTN and the ACE program by Pablo Ciccarello.
  • I was up next with my “Pluggable Databases : What they will break and why you should use them anyway!” talk. I had a full room and the response to it was really good. I got some good questions at the end and amazingly, I managed to finish on time. :)
  • Then came Debra Lilley with “PaaS4SaaS”.
  • Next up was “Controlling Execution Plans (without touching the code)” by Kerry Osborne. This was a double session, split by lunch.
  • After that was Mike Dietrich with his “How Oracle Single/Multitenant will change a DBA’s life” talk.
  • I closed the day with “It’s raining data! Oracle Databases in the Cloud’. Once again, a busy room and some good interaction with the audience. I’m not sure how many people feel ready for a move to the cloud, but the level of interest is definitely high.

I got really tired in the middle of the day. At one point I sat in a big chair and started to nod off, so I went out and got a giant cup of coffee, which perked me up. :)

There were a couple of the other speakers I was interested in seeing, but they weren’t presenting in English, so no luck there. :)

After the event we walked back to the hotel and I was coerced into drinking alcohol. Well actually, I just fancied it. :) Due to the fact I rarely drink, I felt very drunk very quickly. My alcohol tolerance is truly pathetic. :)

From the bar we wandered over to meet the other speakers and organisers at a barbecue restaurant. You might think that wasn’t the best place for a vegetarian to be, but you would be wrong. There was loads of good stuff I could eat, plus excellent company! :)

After far too much food, we headed back through the rain to the hotel and then to bed.

This really concluded the AROUG event for me. All my sessions were on day 1, so I get day 2 to do a bit of sightseeing. :)

I’d like to send out a big thank you to everyone who came to the event, including the attendees and the speakers. Also, big thanks to the organisers at AROUG and the ACE Program, who made this possible for me.

Cheers

Tim…

OTN Tour of Latin America 2015 : AROUG, Argentina – Day 1 was first posted on August 6, 2015 at 1:39 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Installing Application Management for Oracle Utilities in Offline Mode

Anthony Shorten - Wed, 2015-08-05 18:09

The Oracle Application Management Pack for Oracle Utilities is usually installed using the Self Update feature in Oracle Enterprise Manager. It is easiest method of installation. This requires the Oracle Management Server to be connected to the internet (directly of via proxy) which some site do not allow. Luckily Oracle Enterprise Manager has an offline mode as well and the installation of the pack can also be done offline.

Here is how you install the pack in offline mode:

  • Download the pack from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud. This is known as an OPAR which is the install format for the pack.
  • Transfer the OPAR to the machine housing the Oracle Management Server (OMS) component of Oracle Enterprise Manager. If your installation is multi-OMS then refer to the Oracle Enterprise Manager installation guide for more instructions. Ensure the user you are using to install has read access to the file at least.
  • Logon to the OMS machine and execute the following command from the oms/bin directory.
./emcli setup -url=https://<omsserver>:<omsport>/em -username=sysman -password=<password> -trustall

 where:

<omserver> is the OMS server name

<omsport> is the administration port for the OMS

<password> is the password for the OMS administrator

  • Execute the command to install the pack:
./emcli import_update -file=<oparname> -omslocal

where:

<oparname> - Fully qualified name and path of the file you downloaded.

  • Now deploy the pack on the OMS using the PlugIn maintenance from the console. This may require an outage as pack installs may change the OMR and OMS.
  • Deploy the pack on agents located on the Oracle Utilities servers.

That is how you install the pack in offline mode.

Usability of Text Analytics

Oracle AppsLab - Wed, 2015-08-05 15:44

User experience design as a career fell largely on the era of GUI. Thus most people in my profession are visual thinkers if not by birth than by experience. When it comes to presenting information, we think visualization. Times are changing, and with that we are challenged to present information verbally. This is where text analytics meets UX. I only worked on a handful of projects that are about text, and only with a handful of text technologies, but the experience has been worth mentioning.

Text analytics, more or less meaning the same as text mining, is “devising of patterns and trends from text through means such as statistics…” (Oh, Wikipedia!)

There are many areas of text analytics – text summarization, information retrieval, sentiment analysis, named entity recognition, and on… The tools and techniques are constantly getting better, it is exciting. I get an impression that the text mining companies are intoxicated with the coolness of technologies they build, so they think of it first and think of possible industry applications later. As I am conditioned to think in an opposite direction, it was interesting for me to see how the same technique can be so useful in one case and completely irrelevant in another.

Here is my use case inventory. Take a brand manager versus a sales representative. A brand manager might like daily sentiment analysis of her brands and those of her competitor. On the other hand, the sales representatives we have interviewed are not at all into sentiment analysis. What they look for is highly tuned searches that would brief them daily on what’s happening with their top clients. They also search for industry news that they can retweet with a hope to influence the clients. A money manager might need to use text analytics to contextualize the jump in a stock price, while a marketer would rather have a predictive text mining tool to target customers for a purchasing recommendation. I often research different design topics and am interested in text analytics that would make me see at a glance what a collection of papers or articles is about. I also like to see daily summaries of trending topics in design and technology.

So the first lesson I’ve learned is how all text analytics use cases are different.

The second lesson is how the devil is in detail.

For one of my project, I wanted to have a condensed representation of press coverage for the new release of HCM applications, specifically, its user experience. For my purposes, I wanted to have it as a cloud of words. I have collected a number of press releases and reviews, and fed them through four text analytics tools I could put my hands on, namely Semantria, Open Calais, TagCrowd, and Oracle’s own Social Relationship Management (SRM) Listen and Analyze.

Here are the results.

results

For the fairness of the comparison, I have stripped the lists of its the original formatting (the products have drastically different interfaces), and limited the results to 20 items. Moreover, some packages categorize the results into “themes,” “entities,” etc. I kind of had to either pick or merge. SRM doesn’t allow me to feed corpus of text to it to analyze, so I had to create a search query about OAUX instead.

You can see that the differences are dramatic. I believe some differences are the results of subtle choices made by the product designers – frequency thresholds, parts of speech included, the choice of either 1, 2 or 3 word phrases, etc. Other differences are the results of the actual algorithms beneath – bag of words, word vectors, neural nets, skip grams, chaining, deep learning, … . At first, I was determined to figure them all out. I quickly realized that there is no way I can get through the math of it. So I decided to approach it in a chocolate tasting way. If I like the taste, I’ll make an effort to read the ingredients.

Semantria I liked the most. I liked the combination of themes and entities; I thought the length of the phrases was well balanced. I read the ingredients. Instead of plain word frequencies, Semantria uses something called “lexical chaining” to score themes. “The algorithm takes context and noun-phrase placement into account when scoring themes.” I put “lexical chaining” high on my list of likes.

OpenCalais looked totally solid, though heavy on terms and nouns, and light on themes and adjectives. This is to no surprise, as Named Entity Recognition is OpenCalais’ core competency, and there it is unsurpassed. The new “generic relations” feature in a shape of a “subject-predicate-object” is amazing.

TagCrowd’s was definitely too plain to represent what the collection is about. This is a very simple well-meaning word frequency tool, with the stop words (the and a removed) being its only “lexical analysis” feature. From TagCrowd I’ve learned that the word frequencies can take you only that far.

Finally, there is SRM. SRM uses latent semantic analysis, which is a type of vectorial technique.

And what’s your favorite?Possibly Related Posts:

Old Becomes New - Maker Stuff

Floyd Teter - Wed, 2015-08-05 12:23
A bit of a personal tangent for this post, as I've experienced an interesting development in life recently.  I’m taking another run at the “Maker” concept after taking a few months away from it. And I’m coming at it from an entirely different angle.  The combination of data, radio waves and networks has piqued my interest.  Some background:
My father was an amateur radio operator back in the day.  It was one of his passions…so much so that his radio call sign (K0RFS) is engraved on his tombstone.  Big radio, big amplified, big antenna tower with multiple antennas in the backyard, the best Morse code keys money could buy, etc.  He saw it as both a hobby and a way to render service to others (he used to patch up a local family of Argentine immigrants with their family back home on a regular basis).  Dad’s heyday in amateur radio started immediately after WWII and continued through his passing in 1990.
Amateur radio technology is generally very old school.  Marconi made the first wireless radio contact from Cape Cod into Europe in 1912 using Morse code.  Voice technology was added around 1921.  We’ve seen the additions of packet radio, APRS, RTTY, SSTV, PSK31, radio propagation beacons, radio satellites, and other interesting stuff.  But it all comes back around to the same old radio wave technology.
Except it’s not.  Amateur radio operators can communicate with radios across the internet utilizing the IRLP system.  Heck, you don’t really even need a radio to play anymore - EchoLink allows computer>radio, radio>computer, and even computer>computer communication.  And it’s the merging of old technology with more recent technology in new and interesting ways that has really gnawed at my imagination.
Becoming a licensed ham radio guy has been on my bucket list, mostly as a tip o the hat to the old man.  Years in coming, I finally passed the Technician’s exam here in the States and thus earned my license (call sign K1RFS…what else?).  And I’m planning on using my Tech privileges as a springboard into some interesting maker experiments.  Some of the things on my project backlog include:
  • Building a Yagi antenna from a metal tape measure and PVC - and using that antenna to talk with the ISS
  • Making an OS-agnostic communication logging program in Oracle APEX
  • Working with amateur radio frequency beacons to track objects in areas without internet or cell service - power generation here will be interesting - then creating RESTful services to display the tracking of  those locations
  • Building an HMSS mesh net in my home that can be accessed via radio wave technology - 2nd step includes reliability when the electrical grid is offline
  • Creating a permanent IRLP node with a Raspberry Pi
  • Leveraging a combination of an AMSAT satellite and a smart phone to send and receive amateur TV images wirelessly - my target audience is one of the science exploration stations in Antartica
  • Communicating via IRLP and Echolink through wearable hardware
Old becomes new.  This should be fun!

Reddit 10 year growth analysis and visualization

Nilesh Jethwa - Wed, 2015-08-05 12:11

In this article we will analyze the 10 year growth history of Reddit using simple visualizations.

Read more http://www.infocaptor.com/dashboard/reddit-10-year-growth-analysis-and-visualization

Compression

Jonathan Lewis - Wed, 2015-08-05 06:06
Originally published Jan 2013

Red Gate have asked me to write a few articles for their Oracle site, so I’ve sent them a short series on “traditional” compression in Oracle – which means I won’t be mentioning Exadata hybrid columnar compression (HCC a.k.a. EHCC). There will be five articles, published at the rate of one per week starting Tuesday (15th Jan). I’ll be supplying links for them as they are published.

Updated Aug 2015

Since I’ve got a little catalogue on compression started, I decided to add some items from my blog to the list, starting with a six-part series on HCC and compression units that I wrote (mostly) in the summer of 2012.

There are a few other items on my blog that I’ll add to this list eventually.


Expert Oracle Application Express 2nd Edition

Denes Kubicek - Wed, 2015-08-05 02:00
Expert Oracle Application Express 2nd Edition seems to be available at Apress. Buy this book and support the charity project in memory of Carl Backstrom and Scott Spadafore (previous members of the APEX Team). Please note that all funds will be donated to the families of these two great men.

Categories: Development

OTN Tour of Latin America 2015 : UYOUG, Uruguay – Day 2

Tim Hall - Wed, 2015-08-05 01:00

I woke up early and started working on the computer. I wrote a couple of blog posts and logged in to work to check some stuff out. I also re-recorded the vocal for the ALL, ANY and SOME video. The mic I was using wasn’t too good, but I was keen to get it done, rather than wait until I got back to the UK. Overall, it was a pretty busy morning.

I then headed out for my last session of the conference. It was a panel session with Ronald, Mike, Nelson and myself. Putting Ronald and me on a panel together pretty much guaranteed nobody else would get to say anything. I thought the panel went really well. Having someone from a MySQL background on the panel added a different dynamic. Most of the discussion was focussed on why you would pick MySQL over Oracle or vice versa. There was a surprising amount of agreement and some good banter. :) The reaction from the crowd was very positive. :)

That marked the end of the UYOUG conference for me. I hope all the attendees enjoyed the event. I know I did. Thanks very much to everyone for organising it and thanks to the Oracle ACE Program for getting me here. Big thanks to Edelweiss and Nelson for looking after us! :)

From there we got some lunch and I went back to the hotel to do some more work.

At about 17:30 we headed off to catch the ferry to Buenos Aires. I was meant to get a little video footage, but I forgot. :) It took a little over 2 hours to complete, then it was a walk across to the hotel. I did remember to get some footage of that! :)

I got to bed a little after midnight, which wasn’t too bad. Tomorrow is the first day of the AROUG conference in Argentina!

Cheers

Tim…

OTN Tour of Latin America 2015 : UYOUG, Uruguay – Day 2 was first posted on August 5, 2015 at 8:00 am.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

NodeBox

Oracle AppsLab - Tue, 2015-08-04 21:56

In my previous post I argued that the hunt is on for a better way to code, a way more suited for a designer’s need to test new interactions. I said I wanted a process less like solving a Rubik’s cube and more like throwing a pot. What does this actually mean?

“I want to grab a clump of clay and just continuously shape it with my hands until I am satisfied.”

There are two key concepts here: “continuously shape” and “with my hands.”

Code that is continuously shaped is called reactive programming. A familiar example is the spreadsheet: change a single cell and the rest of the sheet automatically updates. There is no need to write a series of instructions and then “run” them to see what happens; instead every change you make instantly affects the outcome.

“With my hands” refers to a kinesthetic or visuospatial style of thinking which leverages our ability to perceive and manipulate spatial relationships. Traditional programming languages are frustrating for visual thinkers; they rely on a phonological style which uses hands only to type and eyes only to read.

In theory, any written language can instead be represented as a collection of elements arranged and connected in space; this is the idea behind visual programming languages. Instead of typing instructions, you drag objects around and connect them together to express ideas.

 Origami (Quartz Composer), Coral, Scratch, Form

Clockwise from upper left: Origami (Quartz Composer), Coral, Scratch, Form

The image above includes some typical examples. Block style IDEs (e.g. Scratch) let you snap together commands like Lego bricks. The others let you drag boxes around and string wires between them.

I think it’s easy to see at a glance the problem with this approach: it doesn’t scale. Stringing wires or snapping bricks gets really messy really fast. Reaching elbow deep into a rat’s nest of wires is not anything like shaping clay.

But it doesn’t have to be this bad. The problem these examples have is that, although visual, they slavishly adhere to an imperative style of coding where instructions are listed in order and even the words within each instruction must follow a specific syntax. This forces connections into arbitrary knots and loops, creating more tangles and going against the overall flow. A visual style demands a simpler, more fluid kind of logic.

Enter an old idea in computer science which has seen a recent resurgence: functional programming. In place of a sequence of instructions which focus on how to do things, functional programming languages use chains of transformations that focus on the desired result at each point. Loops are banished and each node can have only one output so everything naturally flows in the same direction. A classic example is Lisp; a more modern functional language now gaining traction is Clojure.  Don’t be scared.

So what we need is a functional reactive programming language with a responsive, fun to use visual IDE, designed specifically for artists. Extra bonus points if it includes natural scrubbing interactions for setting values ala Bret Victor.

Meet NodeBox. NodeBox is an open source, cross-platform GUI originally developed for generative artists. I first encountered it at the OpenVis conference in 2013. The video of that presentation is a great introduction; you can skip to 22:00 to see a demo of NodeBox in action which shows how quickly and easily you can shape a visualization. This is what I mean by shaping clay.

 Recursive Pentagons

A simple Nodebox network: Recursive Pentagons

This NodeBox “network” draws a set of nested pentagons. The structure is so simple you can see how it works just by looking at it. Make a pentagon node, color it, hook it to a “nextChild” subnetwork that makes a smaller copy, repeat three more times, then combine all five pentagons into a single display.

You can double-click on any node to render it on the main screen; a white triangle in the lower right corner indicates the currently rendered node. You can then single-click any other node to adjust its parameters – in this case the original pentagon node. By scrubbing (dragging the mouse across) the radius field I can increase or decrease its size; making the top pentagon bigger will automatically make all its children bigger. In this way I can quickly scrub values to get the result I want.

A NodeBox network which can draw itself

A NodeBox network which can draw itself

Another (somewhat mind-bending) example: a NodeBox network which can draw itself. On the right is a set of nodes that opens a JSON file, analyzes the contents, and plots it as a series of rectangles and connecting lines. On the left is what happens when that JSON file happens to contain this network’s own structure (taken directly from it’s .ndbx file).

I’ve been playing with NodeBox for about six months now and have created over forty networks which let me play with and try out various visualizations and data-driven animations. I find that some things which are easy to do in other languages are hard to do in NodeBox (or just hard for me to figure out how to do). But the reverse is also true: some things that are difficult or time-consuming to do in any other language are spectacularly easy in NodeBox.

Debugging, in particular, is much less time-consuming and almost fun. I catch most bugs instantly since every change I make is instantly rendered. When something unexpected does happen I can just click on each node in turn to follow the steps of a process. When something is too big or too small or in the wrong place I can simply scrub a parameter or even just grab the offending object and drag it where it needs to go.

Scaling up to large projects is manageable, but remains problematic. If you think clearly enough you can encapsulate everything into a handful of subnetworks and sub-subnetworks. But this can only go so far. NodeBox’s functional approach eliminates “side effects;” a change made to one function cannot affect distant functions unless those two functions are physically linked. This prevents the nasty hard-to-trace bugs which plague procedural languages, but it also means there are no global variables, which in turn means that if you want a variable to effect twenty different functions you will need to create at least twenty separate links.

You can alleviate this somewhat by using Null nodes as cable ties. If two clumps of nodes have many interlinkages, you can physically separate them, lay one cable across the void to a Null node, and then distribute its output from there. After I get something working in NodeBox I usually spend some more time “tidying up,” rearranging nodes into related clumps and positioning nodes to reduce the number of crossing lines. I regard this not as a nuisance, but as a pleasant, almost meditative ritual that helps me optimize my code.

NodeBox does have one major limitation: it doesn’t do input. It was designed to produce intricate still images and animations, not to facilitate end user interactions. So there are no input fields, no buttons, no sliders, no checkboxes – no way to create a standalone interactive prototype. These things could all be done in theory, it’s just that NodeBox does not currently provide any *nodes* to do them.

This is ironic because the NodeBox IDE itself is richly interactive. It’s vector-based ZUI (zoomable user interface) is a joy to use. So as a designer I can experience wonderful interactions by scrubbing node parameters and zooming in and out, but I can’t create a similar experience for my end users.

My use of NodeBox, therefore, is limited to creating sketches and animations. This is no small thing – it allows me to play and try and then convey the essence of ideas which are inherently hard to test and demonstrate. But for now I will still have to move to other languages if I need to create stand-alone interactives.

I think the deeper value of NodeBox is that it shows what is possible. There are better ways of imagining, better ways of coding. If we hope to create ever better experiences for our users, we need to keep searching for these better ways.Possibly Related Posts:

IBM’s Misleading or Just Incorrect National Ad on Student Retention

Michael Feldstein - Tue, 2015-08-04 19:29

By Phil HillMore Posts (354)

Thanks to Chris Edwards for alerting me to this one. In a nutshell, IBM launched a national ad campaign last month that included commercials during Wimbledon on the weekend. They’re spending big money on this campaign about big data, learning analytics, and reducing “dropout rates” [emphasis added below].

In the US, 3 in 10 college students drop out, but how can you spot who is at risk? The one who lives far from campus? The one who works the night shift? The one with new responsibilities? One thing can’t tell you, but the right combination can. Universities are using IBM Analytics to understand pressures in and out of the classroom. Some expect to cut dropout rates by 25%. IBM Analytics is working to make education smarter every day.

If you follow the URL listed at the end of the YouTube video and select ‘Education’, you get to the main page that highlights the same video as above. For further explanation:

Using the IBM Exceptional Student Experience, universities can deploy predictive analytics running on the SoftLayer® cloud. They analyze more deeply what they always have—things like poor attendance and failing grades. But they are also beginning to factor in new kinds of data: how far students live from campus, how many hours a week they work, even how often they log on to the university Wi-Fi network. Universities can then customize a course of action for each student. Even something as simple as providing transportation vouchers can be beneficial. The platform gives professors, advisors and students themselves a view of personalized performance, so students can get help—before it’s too late.

With a little searching, you can find a series of education case studies which are quite well documented. But searching through them reveals no data to back up the claim made above. The closest one is Hamilton County, TN.

Through this innovation [predictive analytics], Hamilton County Schools achieved the best ‘No Child Left Behind’ results in its history, reducing its annual dropout rate by 25 percent and increasing its success rates by eight percent.

But that is a K-12 example. On the higher ed side, there is one case study for Ithaca College about increasing retention rates by 4% and another for Brockenhurst College about their expectation “to improve student recruitment and retention by 15 percent over a five-year period”. The University of Western Sydney is:

running a pilot program with the School of Business, where they have already designed specific retention strategies for each category. We’re really excited to see the impact this has on their attrition rates over the next year.

While IBM’s use of documented case studies is commendable, none of these back up the claims in the national ad. I contacted IBM to get more information, and they agreed to look into the matter. A representative for IBM’s Global Industry Marketing for Government and Education shared the same case studies on retention that I had already found. We had a phone call where I described the problem that nothing backed up the claim, and he said he would find out what the basis was for the commercial.

18 days later and no more responses despite several email reminders.

Let’s look at the claim in more detail.

“Some”

Some universities, some people, some marketing folks? Given the context of the ad which is all about higher ed, I would assume that this means “some colleges and universities”, but we don’t know.

“Expect”

Does this mean a group of universities has piloted the use of IBM Analytics, and the early results predict that campus-wide deployment might reduce dropouts by 25% (best case)? Or does this mean some guy they met at Starbucks expects some big results after reading IBM’s marketing? Or is someone expecting that Hamilton County K-12 results will do the same for higher ed? We don’t know.

“To Cut Dropout Rates”

The phrase “dropout rates” is used more commonly in K-12 and not higher ed. In higher ed, the issue is captured more by retention and persistence. Does IBM mean that specific course drops will decrease by 25%? Given the intro about 3 in 10 college students dropping out, I assume this means 25% fewer students will drop out of college – stop attending. In the Hamilton County K-12 example, they mean students dropping out of high school altogether. But we don’t know.

“By 25%”

This is the most troubling point. IBM takes a specific performance-sounding number which leads the viewer to believe that there are real results backing up this specific claim. But when pressed, even IBM executives cannot justify this specific number.

Two Conclusions, Neither Good

@PhilOnEdTech I mean, if a national ad budget is fueling unrealistic expectations about how to help solve a pressing #EdTech problem…

— Chris Edwards (@chris3edwards) July 11, 2015


I appreciate IBM’s initial willingness to talk to me, but Chris is right about fueling unrealistic expectations on a serious education problem. Given the lack of explanation, there are only two conclusions that I can draw from this experience. One is that IBM has some data buried somewhere to back up the claim, but no one can find it and therefore it is not documented. That is the best case scenario. The other, more problematic, conclusion is that IBM put out an ad without any data to back it up. Either way, the ad on student retention cannot be backed up by any documented case study. That is wrong.

My offer to IBM to get their explanation in public still stands. If they find some data to backup the ad, I will post the information here on e-Literate. If not, IBM should take down the ad, revise their web page, and publish an explanation of the changes.

The post IBM’s Misleading or Just Incorrect National Ad on Student Retention appeared first on e-Literate.

August 12: Oracle on Oracle HR Cloud―Customer Forum by Oracle’s Anje Dodson

Linda Fishman Hoyle - Tue, 2015-08-04 16:42
Join us for an Oracle HCM Cloud Forum on Wednesday, August 12, 2015. Anje Dodson (pictured left), HR Vice President at Oracle, will explain how and why Oracle is moving 126,000 employees from Oracle E-Business Suite on premise to the Oracle HCM Cloud.

During this customer forum call, the host, Sr. Director Linda Fishman, Oracle HCM Cloud, Customer Adoption Strategy, will interview Dodson to discuss the reasons Oracle decided to switch from on premise to the cloud. They will also talk about why the company chose a phased approach for the implementation and where it is in that process.Finally, Dodson will explain the expectations for and benefits of the new modern HR system.

Register now to attend the live forum on Wednesday, August 12, 2015, at 09:00 a.m. Pacific Time / 12:00 p.m Eastern Time.

permission issue due to one role

Laurent Schneider - Tue, 2015-08-04 09:21

Most permissions issues are due to a missing role or privilege.

But in the following test case you need to revoke the right to get more privileges.


create table tt(x number);
create view v as select * from tt;
create role rw;
grant all on v to rw;

I’ve created a read-write role on a view. The owner of the role is the DBA, but the owner of the view is the application. Next release, the role may prevent an application upgrade


SQL> create or replace view v as select * from dual;
ORA-01720: grant option does not exist for 'SYS.DUAL'

Ok, if I drop the role, it works


SQL> drop role r;
Role dropped.
SQL> create or replace view v as select * from dual;
View created.

It is not always a good thing to grant privileges on a view, when you are not the owner of that view

Microsoft Edge and PeopleSoft

Duncan Davies - Tue, 2015-08-04 08:00

edgeThe Windows 10 upgrade was released late last week, and with it came a new web browser – Microsoft Edge. Formerly codenamed Project Spartan, Edge is the default web browser in Windows 10. Internet Explorer 11 is also be included with the new OS, but is basically unchanged from the version of IE11 found in Windows 7 and 8.1.

Although it might be a while until Windows 10 gains widespread enterprise adoption, it’ll likely have reasonably swift uptake in the home so Edge will start becoming an important browser for externally exposed PeopleSoft systems within 6 months or so.

First Impressions of Edge

It’s actually pretty nice. It’s clean, unobtrusive (unlike those Firefox skins) and snappy to use. It doesn’t work for all websites however – some sites give the following:

IE is needed

 

This is controlled by a ‘blacklist’ of sites however, so there’s no need to worry about your PeopleSoft implementation giving this message.

Edge and PeopleSoft

So, does it work with PeopleSoft? The answer is Yes, it certainly seems to. I’ve spent a fair amount of time noodling through some ‘difficult’ pages and they look OK to me. I compared with HCM 92 Image 13 – the latest at time of writing – and both Fluid and Classic UIs look great.

fluid in edge


WordPress 4.2.4

Tim Hall - Tue, 2015-08-04 07:22

wordpressBy the time you read this, you are probably auto-magically running on WordPress 4.2.4. :)

It’s a security release. You can read about the changes here.

Have a good time sitting back and doing nothing while it takes care of itself! :)

Cheers

Tim…

WordPress 4.2.4 was first posted on August 4, 2015 at 2:22 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.