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ADF BC View Object SQL Query Customization with MDS

Andrejus Baranovski - Thu, 2014-10-23 12:51
This post is based on my previous article about MDS Seeded Customization - MDS Seeded Customization Approach with Empty External Project. Today I will focus on explaining how to customise SQL query for read-only VO. This is not so obvious as it sounds. However, it is doable - I will explain how.

Sample application - MDSCustomizationsApp_v2.zip contains both main and customisation projects. Main project implements read-only VO for Jobs data, it doesn't include Job Title attribute:


This is how SQL query looks for such VO in the wizard:


We should take a look into the source code, SQL query is defined by SQLQuery tag. Tag doesn't have ID, this would disable tag customisation using JDEV MDS wizards:


No matter there is no ID set, we still could customise it - I will show you how. Here is the example of SQL query customisation stored in MDS customisation file. Firstly you should remove SQL query completely from VO and then add it again (this will create two entries in MDS customisation file). Once SQL query is written to the MDS customisation file, we can change it as we would like to - Job Title attribute is added to the SQL statement:


We need to add separately VO attribute for Job Title, this can be done through JDEV MDS customisation wizard. Make sure to set IsSelected=true property, otherwise attribute will not be set from the query:


You should drag and drop Job Title attribute from Data Control into the fragment, this will generate binding entry in the page definition file:


UI component for Job Title will be generated as ADF Faces output text:


You should notice on runtime customised SQL statement executed, this statement would include Job Title added through MDS customisation:


Job Title value is fetched and displayed on UI:

Pattern Matching (MATCH_RECOGNIZE) in Oracle Database 12c

Tim Hall - Thu, 2014-10-23 11:45

I’ve spent the last couple of evenings playing with the new SQL pattern matching feature in Oracle 12c.

I’m doing some sessions on analytic functions in some upcoming conferences and I thought I should look at this stuff. I’m not really going to include much, if anything, about it as my sessions are focussed on beginners and I don’t really want to scare people off. The idea is to ease people in gently, then let them scare themselves once they are hooked on analytics. :) I’m thinking about Hooked on Monkey Fonics now…

At first glance the pattern matching seems pretty scary. There are a lot of options and as soon as you throw regular expressions into the mix it does make your head swim a little. After a couple of half-baked attempts, where I found convenient excuses to give in when the going got tough, I finally sat down and plugged through the docs. If you actually RTFM it is a lot easier than hoping to wing it. Who’da thunk it? :)

I’ve tried to keep the article really light. The docs are pretty good for this stuff (if you read them) and they have a lot of examples. I started adding more and more detail to the article, then chopped most of it out. There is no point regurgitating all the options when it is in the docs. Most of the examples I’ve seen before just talk about basic patterns, like V and W shapes, but it’s quite simple to do complicated stuff once you start playing. In fact it takes more time to set up the example data than it does to figure out the queries to bring it back.

In the near future I will be copy/pasting examples and adjusting them or just sitting with my article and the docs when trying to use this stuff. I think it’s going to take a long time before I can type this stuff from memory. Partly that’s because I can’t see myself having lots of cause to use it. I can’t think of any scenarios I’ve experienced where this would have been a natural fit. Having said that, I’ve never worked in things like stock markets, betting and stuff like that where I can imagine this sort of pattern matching is needed all the time. I seem to remember one person at a conference, who shall remain nameless, saying this feature was one of their drivers for upgrading to 12c. I wonder if that was for real or an exaggeration?

Anyway, if you need this sort of analysis, I think it’s worth checking out, but try to remember it’s not as scary as it first looks. :)

Cheers

Tim…

Pattern Matching (MATCH_RECOGNIZE) in Oracle Database 12c was first posted on October 23, 2014 at 6:45 pm.
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The Benefits of Integrating a Google Search Appliance with an Oracle WebCenter or Liferay Portal

This month, the Fishbowl team presented two webinars on integrating a Google Search Appliance with a WebCenter or Liferay Portal. Our new product, the GSA Portal Search Suite, makes integration simple and also allows for customization to create a seamless, secure search experience. It brings a powerful, Google-like search experience directly to your portal.

The first webinar, “The Benefits of Google Search for your Oracle WebCenter or Liferay Portal”, focused on the Google Search Appliance and the positive experiences users have had with incorporating Google search in the enterprise.

 

The second webinar, “Integrating the Google Search Appliance with a WebCenter or Liferay Portal”, dove deeper into how the GSA Portal Search Suite and how it improves the integration process.

 

The following is a list of questions and answers from the webinar series. If you have any other questions, please feel free to reach out to the Fishbowl team!

Q. What version of SharePoint does this product work with?

A. This product is not designed to work with SharePoint. Google has a SharePoint connector that indexes content from SharePoint and pulls it into the GSA, and then the GSA Portal Search Suite would allow any of that content to be served up in your portal.

Fishbowl also has a product called SharePoint Connector that connects SharePoint with Oracle WebCenter Content.

Q. Is Fishbowl a reseller of the GSA? Where can I get a GSA?

A. Yes, we sell the GSA, as well as add-on products and consulting services for the GSA. Visit our website for more information about our GSA services.

Q. What is the difficulty level of customizing the XSLT front end? How long would it take to roll out?

A. This will depend on what you’re trying to customize. If it’s just colors, headers, etc., you could do it pretty quickly because the difficulty level is fairly low. If you’re looking at doing a full-scale customization and entirely changing the look and feel, that could take a lot longer – I would say upwards of a month. The real challenge is that there isn’t a lot of documentation from Google on how to do it, so you would have to do a lot of experimentation.

One of the reasons we created this product is because most customers haven’t been able to fully customize their GSA with a portal, partly because Google didn’t design it to be customizable in this way.

Q. What versions of Liferay does this product support?

A. It supports version 6.2. If you have another version you’d like to integrate with, you can follow up with our team and we can discuss the possibility of working with other versions.

Q. Do you have a connector for IBM WCM?

A. Fishbowl does not have a connector, but Google has a number of connectors that can integrate with many different types of software.

Q. Are you talking about WebCenter Portal or WCM?

A. This connector is designed for WebCenter Portal. If you’re talking about WCM as in SiteStudio or WebCenter Content, we have done a number of projects with those programs. This particular product wouldn’t apply to those situations, but we have other connectors that would work with programs such as WebCenter Content.

Q. Where is the portlet deployed? Is it on the same managed node?

A. The portlets are deployed on the portlet server in WebCenter Portal.

Q. Where can we get the documentation for this product?

A. While the documentation is not publically available, we do have a product page on the website that includes a lot of information on the Portal Search Suite. Contact your Fishbowl representative if you’d like to learn more about it.

Q. What are the server requirements?

A. WebCenter Portal 11g or Liferay 6.2 and Google Search Appliance 7.2.

Q. Does this product include the connector for indexing content?

A. No, this product does not include a connector. We do have a product called GSA Connector for WebCenter that indexes content and then allows you to integrate that content with a portal. Depending on how your portal is configured, you could also crawl the portal just like you would in a regular website. However, this product focuses exclusively on serving and not on indexing.

Q. How many portals will a GSA support? I have several WebCenter Content domains on the same server.

A. The GSA is licensed according to number of content items, not number of sources. You purchase a license for a certain number of content items and then it doesn’t matter how many domains the content is coming from.

The post The Benefits of Integrating a Google Search Appliance with an Oracle WebCenter or Liferay Portal appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

My Oracle Support Upgrade Complete

Joshua Solomin - Thu, 2014-10-23 09:34
Untitled Document

GPIcon
We upgraded My Oracle Support on October 10, 2014. This upgrade brings changes to help you work more effectively with Oracle Support.

Among the areas you will notice enhancements are:

  • The My Oracle Support customer experience
  • My Oracle Support Chat
  • Knowledge Management
  • Cloud Portal
For details about the latest features visit the My Oracle Support User Resource Center.

 

 

OCP 12C – SQL Enhancements

DBA Scripts and Articles - Thu, 2014-10-23 08:20

Extended Character Data Type Columns In this release Oracle changed the maximum sixe of three data types  In Oracle 12c if you set a VARCHAR2 to 4000 bytes or less it is stored inline, if you set it to more than 4000 bytes then it is transformed in extended character data type and stored out [...]

The post OCP 12C – SQL Enhancements appeared first on Oracle DBA Scripts and Articles (Montreal).

Categories: DBA Blogs

Deploying a Private Cloud at Home — Part 6

Pythian Group - Thu, 2014-10-23 07:35

Today’s blog post is part six of seven in a series dedicated to Deploying a Private Cloud at Home, where I will be demonstrating how to configure controller node with legacy networking ad OpenStack dashboard for webgui. Feel free to check out part five where we configured compute node with OpenStack services.

  1. First load the admin variables admin-openrc.sh
    source /root/admin-openrc.sh
  2. Enable legacy networking
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf DEFAULT network_api_class nova.network.api.API
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf DEFAULT security_group_api nova
  3. Restart the Compute services
    service openstack-nova-api restart
    service openstack-nova-scheduler restart
    service openstack-nova-conductor restart
  4. Create the IP pool which will be assigned to the instances we will launch later. My network is 192.168.1.0/24. I took a subpool of the range and I am using that subnet to assign IPs to the VMs. As the VMs will be on my shared network I want the ip in the same range my other systems on the network.
    Here I am using the subnet of 192.168.1.16/28
  5. Create a network
    nova network-create vmnet --bridge br0 --multi-host T --fixed-range-v4 192.168.1.16/28
  6. Verify networking by listing the network
    nova net-list
  7. Install dashboard. Dashboard gives you webui to manage OpenStack instances and services. As we will be using the default configuration I am not going in detail with this.
    yum install -y mod_wsgi openstack-dashboard
  8. Update the ALLOWED_HOSTS in local_settings to include the addresses you wish to access the dashboard from. I am running these in my Intranet so I allowed every host in my network. But you can specify which hosts you want to give access.
    ALLOWED_HOSTS = ['*']
  9. Start and enable Apache web server
    service httpd start
    chkconfig httpd on
  10. You can now access the dashboard at http://controller/dashboard

 

This completes the configuration of OpenStack private cloud. We can use the same guide for RackSpace private cloud as it too is based on OpenStack Icehouse, but that is for another time.

Now that we have a working PaaS cloud, we can configure any SaaS on top of it, but that will require another series altogether.

Stay tuned for part seven, our final post in the series Deploying Private Cloud at Home, where I will be sharing scripts that will automate the installation and configuration of controller and compute nodes.

Categories: DBA Blogs

SQL Server failover cluster, VSphere, & SCSI-3 reservation nightmares

Yann Neuhaus - Wed, 2014-10-22 22:53

When I have to install a virtualized SQL Server FCI at a customer place as an SQL Server consultant, the virtualized environment usally is ready. I guess this is the same for most part of the database consulting people. Since we therefore lack practice, I have to admit that we do not always know the good configuration settings to apply to the virtualized layer in order to correctly run our SQL Server FCI architecture.

A couple of days ago, I had an interesting case where I had to help my customer to correctly configure the storage layer on VSphere 5.1. First, I would like to thank my customer because I seldom have the opportunity to deal with VMWare (other than via my personal lab).

The story begins with a failover testing that fails randomly on a SQL Server FCI after switching the SQL Server volumes from VMFS to RDM in a physical compatibility mode. We had to switch because the first configuration was installed in CIB configuration (aka Cluster-In-Box configuration). As you certainly know, it does not provide a full additional layer of high availability over VMWare in this case, because all the virtual machines are on the same host. So we decided to move to a CAB configuration (Cluster across Box) scenario that is more reliable than the first configuration.

In the new configuration, a failover triggers a Windows 170 error randomly with this brief description: "The resource is busy". At this point, I suspected that the ISCI-3 reservation was not performed correctly, but the cluster failover validate report didn’t show any errors concerning the SCSI-3 reservation. I then decided to generate the cluster log to see if I could find more information about my problem - and here is what I found:

 

00000fb8.000006e4::2014/10/07-17:50:34.116 INFO [RES] Physical Disk : HardDiskpQueryDiskFromStm: ClusterStmFindDisk returned device='?scsi#disk&ven_dgc&prod_vraid#5&effe51&0&000c00#{53f56307-b6bf-11d0-94f2-00a0c91efb8b}' 00000fb8.000016a8::2014/10/07-17:50:34.116 INFO [RES] Physical Disk : ResHardDiskArbitrateInternal request Not a Space: Uses FastPath 00000fb8.000016a8::2014/10/07-17:50:34.116 INFO [RES] Physical Disk : ResHardDiskArbitrateInternal: Clusdisk driver handle or event handle is NULL. 00000fb8.000016a8::2014/10/07-17:50:34.116 INFO [RES] Physical Disk : HardDiskpQueryDiskFromStm: ClusterStmFindDisk returned device='?scsi#disk&ven_dgc&prod_vraid#5&effe51&0&000d00#{53f56307-b6bf-11d0-94f2-00a0c91efb8b}' 00000fb8.000006e4::2014/10/07-17:50:34.117 INFO [RES] Physical Disk : Arbitrate - Node using PR key a6c936d60001734d 00000fb8.000016a8::2014/10/07-17:50:34.118 INFO [RES] Physical Disk : Arbitrate - Node using PR key a6c936d60001734d 00000fb8.000006e4::2014/10/07-17:50:34.120 INFO [RES] Physical Disk : HardDiskpPRArbitrate: Fast Path arbitration... 00000fb8.000016a8::2014/10/07-17:50:34.121 INFO [RES] Physical Disk : HardDiskpPRArbitrate: Fast Path arbitration... 00000fb8.000016a8::2014/10/07-17:50:34.122 WARN [RES] Physical Disk : PR reserve failed, status 170 00000fb8.000006e4::2014/10/07-17:50:34.122 INFO [RES] Physical Disk : Successful reserve, key a6c936d60001734d 00000fb8.000016a8::2014/10/07-17:50:34.123 ERR   [RES] Physical Disk : HardDiskpPRArbitrate: Error exit, unregistering key... 00000fb8.000016a8::2014/10/07-17:50:34.123 ERR   [RES] Physical Disk : ResHardDiskArbitrateInternal: PR Arbitration for disk Error: 170. 00000fb8.000016a8::2014/10/07-17:50:34.123 ERR   [RES] Physical Disk : OnlineThread: Unable to arbitrate for the disk. Error: 170. 00000fb8.000016a8::2014/10/07-17:50:34.124 ERR   [RES] Physical Disk : OnlineThread: Error 170 bringing resource online. 00000fb8.000016a8::2014/10/07-17:50:34.124 ERR   [RHS] Online for resource AS_LOG failed.

 

An arbitration problem! It looks to be related to my first guess doesn’t it? Unfortunately I didn’t have access to the vmkernel.log to see potential reservation conflicts. After that, and this is certainly the funny part of this story (and probably the trigger for this article), I took a look at the multi-pathing configuration for each RDM disk. The reason for this is that I remembered some of the conversations I had with one of my friends (he will surely recognize himself Smile) in which we talked about ISCSI-3 reservation issues with VMWare.

As a matter of fact, the path selection policy was configured to round robin here. According to the VMWare KB1010041, PSP_RR is not supported with VSphere 5.1 for Windows failover cluster and shared disks. This is however the default configuration when creating RDM disks with EMC VNX storage which is used by my customer. After changing this setting for each shared disk, no problem occurred!

My customer inquired about the difference between VMFS and RDM disks. I don’t presume to be a VMWare expert because I'm not, but I know that database administrators and consultants cannot just ignore anymore how VMWare (or Hyper-V) works.

Fortunately, most of the time there will be virtual administrators with strong skills, but sometimes not and in this case, you may feel alone facing such problem. So the brief answer I gave to the customer was the following: If we wouldn’t use physical mode RDMs and used VMDKs or virtual mode RDMs instead, the SCSI reservation would be translated to a file lock. In CIB configuration, there is no a problem, but not for CAB configuration, as you can imagine. Furthermore, using PSP_RR with older versions than VSphere 5.5 will free the reservation and can cause potential issues like the one described in this article.

Wishing you a happy and problem-free virtualization!

Using the tc Server build pack for Pivotal Cloud Foundry 1.3

Pas Apicella - Wed, 2014-10-22 19:09
On Pivotal network you will find various build packs you can download and apply to PCF and use for your applications outside of the shipped build packs, using the link below.

https://network.pivotal.io/products/pivotal-cf

I am going to show how you would take one of these build packs , install it and then consume it from an application. In this demo I am going to use "tc server buildpack (offline) v2.4"

1. Log in as admin user and upload the build pack as shown below. I am adding this build pack in the last position which is position 6.

[Tue Oct 21 20:36:01 papicella@:~/cf/buildpacks ] $ cf create-buildpack tc_server_buildpack_offline tc-server-buildpack-offline-v2.4.zip 6
Creating buildpack tc_server_buildpack_offline...
OK

Uploading buildpack tc_server_buildpack_offline...
OK

2. View buildpacks, which should show the one we just uploaded above.

[Thu Oct 23 11:15:18 papicella@:~/cf/APJ1 ] $ cf buildpacks
Getting buildpacks...

buildpack                     position   enabled   locked   filename
java_buildpack_offline        1          true      false    java-buildpack-offline-v2.4.zip
ruby_buildpack                2          true      false    ruby_buildpack-offline-v1.1.0.zip
nodejs_buildpack              3          true      false    nodejs_buildpack-offline-v1.0.1.zip
python_buildpack              4          true      false    python_buildpack-offline-v1.0.1.zip
go_buildpack                  4          true      false    go_buildpack-offline-v1.0.1.zip
php_buildpack                 5          true      false    php_buildpack-offline-v1.0.1.zip
tc_server_buildpack_offline   6          true      false    tc-server-buildpack-offline-v2.4.zip

3. Push application using your buildpack uploaded above, below is a simple manifest which refers to the build pack I uploaded.

manifest.yml

applications:
- name: pcfhawq
  memory: 512M
  instances: 1
  host: pcfhawq
  domain: yyyy.fe.dddd.com
  path: ./pcfhawq.war
  buildpack: tc_server_buildpack_offline
  services:
   - phd-dev

[Thu Oct 23 11:36:26 papicella@:~/cf/buildpacks ] $ cf push -f manifest-apj1.yml
Using manifest file manifest-apj1.yml

Creating app pcfhawq-web in org pas-org / space apple as pas...
OK

Creating route yyyy.apj1.dddd.gopivotal.com...
OK

Binding pcfhawq-web.yyyy.fe.dddd.com to pcfhawq-web...
OK

Uploading pcfhawq-web...
Uploading app files from: pcfhawq.war
Uploading 644.1K, 181 files
OK
Binding service phd-dev to app pcfhawq-web in org pas-org / space apple as pas...
OK

Starting app pcfhawq-web in org pas-org / space apple as pas...
OK
-----> Downloaded app package (5.6M)
-----> Java Buildpack Version: v2.4 (offline) | https://github.com/pivotal-cf/tc-server-buildpack.git#396ad0a
-----> Downloading Open Jdk JRE 1.7.0_60 from http://download.run.pivotal.io/openjdk/lucid/x86_64/openjdk-1.7.0_60.tar.gz (found in cache)
       Expanding Open Jdk JRE to .java-buildpack/open_jdk_jre (1.3s)
-----> Downloading Spring Auto Reconfiguration 1.4.0_RELEASE from http://download.run.pivotal.io/auto-reconfiguration/auto-reconfiguration-1.4.0_RELEASE.jar (found in cache)
       Modifying /WEB-INF/web.xml for Auto Reconfiguration
-----> Downloading Tc Server Instance 2.9.6_RELEASE from http://download.run.pivotal.io/tc-server/tc-server-2.9.6_RELEASE.tar.gz (found in cache)
       Instantiating tc Server in .java-buildpack/tc_server (3.4s)
-----> Downloading Tc Server Lifecycle Support 2.2.0_RELEASE from http://download.run.pivotal.io/tomcat-lifecycle-support/tomcat-lifecycle-support-2.2.0_RELEASE.jar (found in cache)
-----> Downloading Tc Server Logging Support 2.2.0_RELEASE from http://download.run.pivotal.io/tomcat-logging-support/tomcat-logging-support-2.2.0_RELEASE.jar (found in cache)
-----> Downloading Tc Server Access Logging Support 2.2.0_RELEASE from http://download.run.pivotal.io/tomcat-access-logging-support/tomcat-access-logging-support-2.2.0_RELEASE.jar (found in cache)
-----> Uploading droplet (45M)

1 of 1 instances running

App started

Showing health and status for app pcfhawq-web in org pas-org / space apple as pas...
OK

requested state: started
instances: 1/1
usage: 1G x 1 instances
urls: pcfhawq-web.yyyy.fe.dddd.com

     state     since                    cpu    memory         disk
#0   running   2014-10-23 11:37:56 AM   0.0%   398.6M of 1G   109.2M of 1G

4. Verify within the DEV console the application is using the build pack you targeted.


More Information

Buildpacks
http://docs.pivotal.io/pivotalcf/buildpacks/index.htmlhttp://feeds.feedburner.com/TheBlasFromPas
Categories: Fusion Middleware

Oracle ACE = Oracle’s Bitch?

Tim Hall - Wed, 2014-10-22 16:02

I got a comment today on my recent Oracle fanboy post, which I thought was very interesting and worthy of a blog post in reply. The commenter started by criticising the Oracle license and support costs (we’ve all had that complaint) as well as the quality of support (yes, I’ve been there too), but that wasn’t the thing that stood out. The final paragraph was as follows…

“One addition. I know you, your past work and you are very brainy person but since last couple of years you became Oracle doctrine submissive person just like most of the rest of ACE Directors. When you were just ACEs, you were more trustworthy than now and you weren’t just Oracle interpreters… And unfortunately I’m not the only person with this opinion, but probably I’m only one who is not affraid to make it public.”

I think that’s a really interesting point and one that I feel compelled to write about…

Let me start by saying I don’t believe this comment was in any way directed at the main body of my website. The articles there have always been “how-to” style articles and typically don’t contain much in the way of opinions about the functionality. I’ve always tried to keep facts in the articles and opinions and random junk on the blog. With that distinction in place, let’s talk about my blog…

When I first joined the Oracle ACE Program in 2006 I was very concious of what *I thought it meant* about what I could and couldn’t say. On the one hand I didn’t want to piss off Oracle as I was very proud of my little ACE badge, but I also didn’t want to be considered Oracle’s Bitch. I quickly learned a couple of things:

  • You are selected for what you are currently doing in the community. If you just keep doing what you do, life will be good. If you spend your whole time slagging off Oracle, you probably won’t get invited on to the program in the first place. If over time you turn into a complete hater, you will probably be asked to leave the program. I guess that’s pretty obvious and true of any evangelism program out there. Does that mean you can’t ever criticise Oracle? Hell no! Instead, I think it makes it your obligation to give constructive criticism whenever possible. One of the things we are encouraged to do is to make stronger links with the product managers so we can give more feedback to help improve the products. If you witnessed the amount of moaning and complaints that get fired at some of the Oracle teams during the ACE Director briefings, you would have no doubts about this. :)
  • The value of the Oracle ACE Program to Oracle is that it is made up of “real” people who think Oracle is cool enough to spend their own time talking about it. If the Oracle ACE Program becomes a collection of yes-men and yes-women, then they might as well send a bunch of sales people to every conference. Oracle have (so far), never complained or tried to veto anything I’ve said in any presentation, blog post or article.

So have I become one of Oracle’s bitches over the last few years? Well, I’ve been an ACE since 1st April 2006 (yes, April fool’s day) and I’ve been an ACE Director since some time in 2007 or 2008. I can’t really remember to be honest, but let’s say for the sake of argument it’s been 6 years as an ACED. If it was becoming an ACED that made me an “Oracle doctrine submissive person” in the last couple of years, it must have taken Oracle four years of work to make me that way. :)

I don’t believe I alter my beliefs to fit any criteria, but I guess it is really difficult to be subjective about yourself and I would be very interested to know what other people think about this. If I think about some common topics of discussion over the last few years where I don’t fall “on message”, they would probably be:

  • I believe Oracle is too expensive.
  • I believe the diagnostics and tuning pack should be part of the base product and available in all editions for free.
  • I believe anything to do with security should be part of the base product and available in all editions for free.
  • I don’t agree with the pricing of data guard standby nodes that are only used for managed recovery. If they are opened for use (read-only, active DG or snapshot standby) I can see why Oracle would want to charge.
  • Although I love the functionality of Cloud Control, I think the implementation is suffering from really bad bloat. It also exhibits some irregularities when different teams work on different aspects of the same functionality, as I discussed here.
  • I am a fan of certification from the perspective of personal development, but I don’t think the piece of paper is worth anything in itself. I’ve written about this here. Having said that, I do agree with the recent re-certification thing.

I’ve just had a look through my posts over the last year and if anything, I would say I’m promoting KeePass and MobaXterm more than Oracle. :) I know I get a little gushy about the ACE Program during conference write ups, and maybe that annoys people a bit, but I just can’t see that I’ve become a total drone… (Denial is not just a river in Africa?)

Anyway, I have two things to say in closing:

  • To people in the Oracle ACE program : If you are worried about what you should and shouldn’t say, my advice is try to be as honest as possible. If the people in the community lose faith in the members of the program, then it is worth nothing!
  • To people in the community : If you honestly believe you see a change in behaviour when someone joins the program you should call them out on it. I would suggest you do this in private and give some examples of situations that give you concern. If they are “the type of people the program needs”, they should be concerned about this also!

Cheers

Tim…

PS. For those that feel the need to, please don’t wade in with comments in my defence as I don’t think this is either necessary or helpful. I think the person in question had a genuine concern and quite frankly that makes it a concern of mine also…

Oracle ACE = Oracle’s Bitch? was first posted on October 22, 2014 at 11:02 pm.
©2012 "The ORACLE-BASE Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement.

Keynote: The Year After the Year of the MOOC

Michael Feldstein - Wed, 2014-10-22 15:23

Here’s a talk I gave recently at the CIT event in Duke. In addition to being very nice and gracious, the Duke folks impressed me with how many faculty they have who are not only committed to improving their teaching practices but dedicating significant time to it as a core professional activity.

Anyway, for what it’s worth, here’s the talk:

Click here to view the embedded video.

The post Keynote: The Year After the Year of the MOOC appeared first on e-Literate.

Reminder: first Arizona Oracle User Group meeting tomorrow

Bobby Durrett's DBA Blog - Wed, 2014-10-22 14:02

Fellow Phoenicians (citizens of the Phoenix, Arizona area):

This is a reminder that tomorrow is the first meeting of the newly reborn (risen from the ashes) Arizona Oracle User Group.  Here are the meeting details: url

I hope to meet some of my fellow Phoenix area DBAs tomorrow afternoon.

– Bobby

 


Categories: DBA Blogs

OCP 12C – DataPump, SQL*Loader, External Tables Enhancements

DBA Scripts and Articles - Wed, 2014-10-22 13:57

Oracle DataPump Enhancements Full Transportable Export and Import of Data In Oracle 12c you now have the possibility to create full transportable exports and imports. A full transportable export contains all objects and data needed to create a copy of the database. To create a fully transportable export of your database you need to specify [...]

The post OCP 12C – DataPump, SQL*Loader, External Tables Enhancements appeared first on Oracle DBA Scripts and Articles (Montreal).

Categories: DBA Blogs

Deadlocks

Jonathan Lewis - Wed, 2014-10-22 11:34

A recent question on the OTN forum asked about narrowing down the cause of deadlocks, and this prompted me to set up a little example. Here’s a deadlock graph of a not-quite-standard type:


Deadlock graph:
                                          ---------Blocker(s)--------  ---------Waiter(s)---------
Resource Name                             process session holds waits  process session holds waits
TX-00040001-000008EC-00000000-00000000         50     249     X             48       9           X
TX-000A001F-000008BC-00000000-00000000         48       9     X             50     249           S


My session (the one that dumped the trace file) is 249, and I was blocked by session 9. The slight anomaly, of course, is that I was waiting on a TX lock in mode 4 (Share) rather than the more common mode 6 (eXclusive).

There are plenty of notes on the web these days to tell you that this wait relates in some way to a unique index (or some associated referential integrity) or an ITL wait. (Inevitably there are a couple of other less frequently occurring and less well documented reasons, such as waits for tablespaces to change state but I’m going to ignore those for now). The question is, how do I tell whether this example is related to uniqueness (indexing) or ITLs ? For recent versions of Oracle the answer is in the rest of the trace file which now hold the recent wait history for the session that dumped the trace file.

Reading down my trace file, past the line which says “Information for THIS session”, I eventually get to this:


    Current Wait Stack:
     0: waiting for 'enq: TX - allocate ITL entry'
        name|mode=0x54580004, usn<<16 | slot=0xa001f, sequence=0x8bc
        wait_id=80 seq_num=81 snap_id=1
 

So it didn’t take me long to find out I had an ITL problem (which should be a pretty rare occurrence in newer versions of Oracle); but there’s more:

...

    There is at least one session blocking this session.
      Dumping 1 direct blocker(s):
        inst: 1, sid: 9, ser: 40192
      Dumping final blocker:
        inst: 1, sid: 9, ser: 40192
    There are 2 sessions blocked by this session.
    Dumping one waiter:
      inst: 1, sid: 357, ser: 7531
      wait event: 'enq: TX - allocate ITL entry'

...

    Session Wait History:
        elapsed time of 0.000035 sec since current wait
     0: waited for 'enq: TX - allocate ITL entry'
        name|mode=0x54580004, usn&lt;&lt;16 | slot=0x5000c, sequence=0xa39
        wait_id=79 seq_num=80 snap_id=1
        wait times: snap=5.002987 sec, exc=5.002987 sec, total=5.002987 sec
        wait times: max=5.000000 sec
        wait counts: calls=2 os=2
        occurred after 0.000047 sec of elapsed time
     1: waited for 'enq: TX - allocate ITL entry'
        name|mode=0x54580004, usn&lt;&lt;16 | slot=0xa001f, sequence=0x8bc
        wait_id=78 seq_num=79 snap_id=1
        wait times: snap=1 min 4 sec, exc=1 min 4 sec, total=1 min 4 sec
        wait times: max=1 min 4 sec
        wait counts: calls=22 os=22
        occurred after 0.000032 sec of elapsed time

...
     8: waited for 'enq: TX - allocate ITL entry'
        name|mode=0x54580004, usn&lt;&lt;16 | slot=0x5000c, sequence=0xa39
        wait_id=71 seq_num=72 snap_id=1
        wait times: snap=5.001902 sec, exc=5.001902 sec, total=5.001902 sec
        wait times: max=5.000000 sec
        wait counts: calls=2 os=2
        occurred after 0.000042 sec of elapsed time
     9: waited for 'enq: TX - allocate ITL entry'
        name|mode=0x54580004, usn&lt;&lt;16 | slot=0xa001f, sequence=0x8bc
        wait_id=70 seq_num=71 snap_id=1
        wait times: snap=4.005342 sec, exc=4.005342 sec, total=4.005342 sec
        wait times: max=4.000000 sec
        wait counts: calls=2 os=2
        occurred after 0.000031 sec of elapsed time

...

    Sampled Session History of session 249 serial 3931
    ---------------------------------------------------

    The history is displayed in reverse chronological order.

    sample interval: 1 sec, max history 120 sec
    ---------------------------------------------------
      [9 samples,                                          11:14:50 - 11:14:58]
        waited for 'enq: TX - allocate ITL entry', seq_num: 81
          p1: 'name|mode'=0x54580004
          p2: 'usn&lt;= 8 sec (still in wait)
      [5 samples,                                          11:14:45 - 11:14:49]
        waited for 'enq: TX - allocate ITL entry', seq_num: 80
          p1: 'name|mode'=0x54580004
          p2: 'usn&lt;&lt;16 | slot'=0x5000c
          p3: 'sequence'=0xa39
          time_waited: 5.002987 sec (sample interval: 4 sec)
...

The little report that follows the initial wait state shows that the situation was a little messy – session 9 was my first and last blocker, but there was another session tangled up in the chain of waits, session 357.

Following this there’s a set of entries from my v$session_wait_history - and if you look carefully at the slot and sequence that appears on the second line of each wait you’ll notice that my waits have been alternating between TWO other sessions/transactions before I finally crashed.

Finally there’s a set of entries for my session extracted from v$active_session_history. (Question: I’m only allowed to query v$active_session_history if I’ve licensed the Diagnostic Pack – so should I shut my eyes when I get to this part of the trace file ;) This breakdown also shows my session alternating between waits on the two different blockers, giving me a pretty good post-event breakdown of what was going on around the time of the deadlock.


MySQL: Troubleshooting an Instance for Beginners

Pythian Group - Wed, 2014-10-22 09:17
IMG_1299

So as you may know, my new position involves the MySQL world, so I’m in the task of picking up the language and whereabouts of this DBMS, and my teamate Alkin Tezuysal (@ask_dba on Twitter) has a very cool break and fix lab which you should check out if you are going to Percona Live London 2014, he will be running this lab, so be sure to don’t miss out.

So the first thing I tried was to bring up the service, but to my surprise, the MySQL user didn’t exist. So the first thing I did was create the user.

Note: Whenever you see “…”, it is to shorten the output.

[user-lab@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]$ service mysqld start
touch: cannot touch ‘/var/log/mysqld.log’: Permission denied
chown: invalid user: ‘mysql:mysql’
chmod: changing permissions of ‘/var/log/mysqld.log’: Operation not permitted
mkdir: cannot create directory ‘/var/lib/msql’: Permission denied
[user-lab@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]$ id mysql
id: mysql: no such user
[user-lab@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]$ sudo useradd mysql

So now that the user exists, I try to bring it up and we are back at square one as the initial configuration variable in the .cnf file is incorrect. But there is another problem, as there is more than one .cnf file.

[user-lab@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]$ sudo su -
Last login: Thu Jul 31 11:37:21 UTC 2014 on pts/0
Last failed login: Tue Oct 14 05:45:47 UTC 2014 from 60.172.228.40 on ssh:notty
There were 1269 failed login attempts since the last successful login.
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# service mysqld start
Initializing MySQL database: Installing MySQL system tables...
141014 17:05:46 [ERROR] /usr/libexec/mysqld: unknown variable 'tmpd1r=/var/tmp'
141014 17:05:46 [ERROR] Aborting

141014 17:05:46 [Note] /usr/libexec/mysqld: Shutdown complete

Installation of system tables failed! Examine the logs in
/var/lib/msql for more information.

...

 [FAILED]

In the Oracle world, it is easier to troubleshoot. Here in the MySQL world, the best way to see which .cnf file is being used, we do it with an strace command.

[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# strace -e trace=open,stat /usr/libexec/mysqld
open("/etc/ld.so.cache", O_RDONLY|O_CLOEXEC) = 3
open("/lib64/libpthread.so.0", O_RDONLY|O_CLOEXEC) = 3
open("/lib64/libaio.so.1", O_RDONLY|O_CLOEXEC) = 3
...
stat("/etc/my.cnf", {st_mode=S_IFREG|0644, st_size=255, ...}) = 0
open("/etc/my.cnf", O_RDONLY)           = 3
stat("/etc/mysql/my.cnf", 0x7fffe4b38120) = -1 ENOENT (No such file or directory)
stat("/usr/etc/my.cnf", {st_mode=S_IFREG|0644, st_size=25, ...}) = 0
open("/usr/etc/my.cnf", O_RDONLY)       = 3
stat("/root/.my.cnf", {st_mode=S_IFREG|0644, st_size=33, ...}) = 0
open("/root/.my.cnf", O_RDONLY)         = 3
...
141014 17:12:05 [ERROR] Fatal error: Please read "Security" section of the manual to find out how to run mysqld as root!

So now I can see that the /usr/etc/my.cnf is the one with the incorrect wording variable, so we modify it to have it the correct one.

[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# cat /usr/etc/my.cnf
[mysqld]
tmpd1r=/var/tmp
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# sed -i -e 's/tmpd1r/tmpdir/' /usr/etc/my.cnf
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# cat /usr/etc/my.cnf
[mysqld]
tmpdir=/var/tmp

Another try, but again the same result — but even worse this time, as there is no output. After digging around, I found that the place to look is the /var/log/mysqld.log and the problem was that some libraries belonged to root user, instead of the MySQL user.

[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# service mysqld start
MySQL Daemon failed to start.
Starting mysqld:                                           [FAILED]
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# cat /var/log/mysqld.log
141014 17:16:33 mysqld_safe Starting mysqld daemon with databases from /var/lib/msql
141014 17:16:33 [Note] Plugin 'FEDERATED' is disabled.
/usr/libexec/mysqld: Table 'mysql.plugin' doesn't exist
141014 17:16:33 [ERROR] Can't open the mysql.plugin table. Please run mysql_upgrade to create it.
141014 17:16:33 InnoDB: The InnoDB memory heap is disabled
141014 17:16:33 InnoDB: Mutexes and rw_locks use GCC atomic builtins
141014 17:16:33 InnoDB: Compressed tables use zlib 1.2.7
141014 17:16:33 InnoDB: Using Linux native AIO
/usr/libexec/mysqld: Can't create/write to file '/var/tmp/ib1rikjr' (Errcode: 13)
141014 17:16:33  InnoDB: Error: unable to create temporary file; errno: 13
141014 17:16:33 [ERROR] Plugin 'InnoDB' init function returned error.
141014 17:16:33 [ERROR] Plugin 'InnoDB' registration as a STORAGE ENGINE failed.
141014 17:16:33 [ERROR] Unknown/unsupported storage engine: InnoDB
141014 17:16:33 [ERROR] Aborting

141014 17:16:33 [Note] /usr/libexec/mysqld: Shutdown complete
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# perror 13
Error code 13: Permission denied
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# ls -l /var/lib/mysql/mysql/plugin.*
-rw-rw---- 1 root root 8586 Mar 13  2014 /var/lib/mysql/mysql/plugin.frm
-rw-rw---- 1 root root    0 Mar 13  2014 /var/lib/mysql/mysql/plugin.MYD
-rw-rw---- 1 root root 1024 Mar 13  2014 /var/lib/mysql/mysql/plugin.MYI
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# chown -R mysql:mysql /var/lib/mysql/mysql/

So I think, yey, I’m set and it will come up! I give it one more shot and, you guessed it, same result and different error :( This time around the problem seemed to be that the memory assigned is incorrect and we don’t have enough on the machine, so we change it.

[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# service mysqld start
MySQL Daemon failed to start.
Starting mysqld:                                           [FAILED]
141014 17:36:15 mysqld_safe Starting mysqld daemon with databases from /var/lib/mysql
141014 17:36:15 [Note] Plugin 'FEDERATED' is disabled.
141014 17:36:15 InnoDB: The InnoDB memory heap is disabled
141014 17:36:15 InnoDB: Mutexes and rw_locks use GCC atomic builtins
141014 17:36:15 InnoDB: Compressed tables use zlib 1.2.7
141014 17:36:15 InnoDB: Using Linux native AIO
141014 17:36:15 InnoDB: Initializing buffer pool, size = 100.0G
InnoDB: mmap(109890764800 bytes) failed; errno 12
141014 17:36:15 InnoDB: Completed initialization of buffer pool
141014 17:36:15 InnoDB: Fatal error: cannot allocate memory for the buffer pool
141014 17:36:15 [ERROR] Plugin 'InnoDB' init function returned error.
141014 17:36:15 [ERROR] Plugin 'InnoDB' registration as a STORAGE ENGINE failed.
141014 17:36:15 [ERROR] Unknown/unsupported storage engine: InnoDB
141014 17:36:15 [ERROR] Aborting
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# grep 100 /etc/my.cnf
innodb_buffer_pool_size=100G
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# sed -i -e 's/100G/256M/' /etc/my.cnf
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# grep innodb_buffer_pool_size /etc/my.cnf
innodb_buffer_pool_size=256M

Now, I’m not even expecting this instance to come up, and I am correct — It seems a filename has incorrect permissions.

[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# service mysqld start
MySQL Daemon failed to start.
Starting mysqld:                                           [FAILED]
root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# cat /var/log/mysqld.log
...
141014 17:37:15 InnoDB: Initializing buffer pool, size = 256.0M
141014 17:37:15 InnoDB: Completed initialization of buffer pool
141014 17:37:15  InnoDB: Operating system error number 13 in a file operation.
InnoDB: The error means mysqld does not have the access rights to
InnoDB: the directory.
InnoDB: File name ./ibdata1
InnoDB: File operation call: 'open'.
InnoDB: Cannot continue operation.
141014 17:37:15 mysqld_safe mysqld from pid file /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid ended
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# ls -l /var/lib/mysql/ibdata1
-rw-rw---- 1 27 27 18874368 Mar 13  2014 /var/lib/mysql/ibdata1
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# ls -l /var/lib/mysql
total 83980
-rw-rw---- 1    27    27 18874368 Mar 13  2014 ibdata1
-rw-rw---- 1    27    27 33554432 Mar 13  2014 ib_logfile0
-rw-rw---- 1    27    27 33554432 Mar 13  2014 ib_logfile1
drwx------ 2 mysql mysql     4096 Mar 13  2014 mysql
drwx------ 2 root  root      4096 Mar 13  2014 performance_schema
drwx------ 2 root  root      4096 Mar 13  2014 test
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# chown -R mysql:mysql /var/lib/mysql

Now, I wasn’t even expecting the service to come up, but to my surprise it came up!

[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# service mysqld start
Starting mysqld:                                           [  OK  ]

So now, what I wanted to do was connect and start working, but again, there was another error! I saw that it was related to the socket file mysql.sock, so I changed it to the correct value in our .cnf file

[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# mysql
ERROR 2002 (HY000): Can't connect to local MySQL server through socket '/tmp/mysql.sock' (2)
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# service mysql status
mysql: unrecognized service
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# service mysqld status
mysqld (pid  5666) is running...
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# ls -l /tmp/mysql.sock
ls: cannot access /tmp/mysql.sock: No such file or directory
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# grep socket /var/log/mysqld.log | tail -n 1
Version: '5.5.36'  socket: '/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock'  port: 3306  MySQL Community Server (GPL)
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# lsof -n | grep mysqld | grep unix
mysqld    5666    mysql   12u     unix 0xffff880066fbea40       0t0     981919 /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# cat /etc/my.cnf
[mysqld]
datadir=/var/lib/mysql

innodb_data_file_path=ibdata1:18M
innodb_buffer_pool_size=256M
innodb_log_file_size=32M
sort_buffer_size=60M

[client]
socket=/tmp/mysql.sock
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# vi /etc/my.cnf
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# service mysqld restart
Stopping mysqld:                                           [  OK  ]
Starting mysqld:                                           [  OK  ]
[root@ip-10-10-10-1 ~]# mysql -p
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 3
Server version: 5.5.36 MySQL Community Server (GPL)

Copyright (c) 2000, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
owners.

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.

mysql>

Conclusion

As you can see, there are different ways to troubleshoot the startup of a MySQL instance, so hope this helps you out in your journey when you are starting to use this DBMS and also if you know of another way, let me know in the comment section below.

Please note that this blog post was originally published on my personal blog.

Categories: DBA Blogs

OCP 12C – Partitioning Enhancements

DBA Scripts and Articles - Wed, 2014-10-22 09:13

Online Partition operations Table Partitions and subpartitions can now be moved online. [crayon-5452a4b0e07fc665769085/] Compression options can also be added during an online partition move. [crayon-5452a4b0e0808059181845/] Reference Partitioning Enhancements Truncate or Exchange Partition with Cascade option With Oracle 12c, it is now possible to use the CASCADE option to cascade operations to a child-referenced table when [...]

The post OCP 12C – Partitioning Enhancements appeared first on Oracle DBA Scripts and Articles (Montreal).

Categories: DBA Blogs

Top 100 analytics companies ranked and scored by Mattermark

Nilesh Jethwa - Wed, 2014-10-22 09:12

Let us move on from Grass Eating Sauropods and talk about who’s who in the analytic space.

For every dime there are dozen analytic companies. Everybody who provides a freaking dashboard is an analytic company. Anybody that merely mentions Google, Facebook, Hadoop etc in the same sentence is somehow into BigData. Haven’t you stumbled across company pages where they claim to be expert in analytics and big data but they want you to schedule a call with them. They don’t have any products or solutions to show case yet they are Big Data/analytics folks.

So to make things easy, Mattermark released this highly curated list of 100 analytic companies. No offense to BigData, but small datasets like these are always juicy.

Image

 

Mattermakr ranks each company using their own algorithm and calls it “Mattermark Score”. After loading it up, we came up with these visualizations

 

InfoCaptor : Analytics & dashboards

 

 

For each funding stage, it shows the listing of companies by Mattermark score.

Some interesting questions

1. How many companies by funding stage?

Image

2. What is the funding by location and stage?

 

InfoCaptor : Analytics & dashboards

 

Another interesting visual by plotting the score against the total funding.

Image

 

We thought the above visual would tell us what kind of logic did Mattermark used to rank the companies. As suspected, apparently we cannot reverse engineer it without some additional information about the companies.

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getting re certified for 12c ( makes me grumpy ) ...

Grumpy old DBA - Wed, 2014-10-22 08:02
So let's be honest at the beginning here.

I have way too many professional certifications for any reasonable semi honest human being.  Along with two old Solaris admin certifications 7 and 8 I am ( besides an MBA degree ha ha ) OCP in 7.3 / 8.0 / 8i / 9i / 10g.  At one point a ways back I was teaching all the OCP curriculum for a local community college yes real classes with live instructors so it made sense to actually take the tests my students were taking.

But it's been a really long time now since I did the 10g new features class and did the 10g OCP upgrade exam.  I thought about doing the 11g upgrade at one point ( and attended the 11g new features class ) but never finished it.

Oracle has recently announced a change in policy where old certifications will start "aging out" / expiring.  I don't like this change at all but well it's probably time for me to do the 12c new features class and get 12c certified.

So now it's going to be somewhat of a nightmare to jump through all the hoops.  I have paper copies of ( some of anyhow ) the OCP's and text exams.

You used to take the tests at Sylvan Prometric sites but now there seems to be some other players involved in this whole thing.  Plus I don't have access to any of the old work emails.

This is probably going to make me a wee bit grumpy getting this all sorted out but maybe please please someone inside at oracle might bail me out?

Update on 10/24/2014: So false alarm this is getting sorted out much faster than I was imagining thanks to the oracle university support team.
Categories: DBA Blogs

High System Time on Windows Running in a VM

Pythian Group - Wed, 2014-10-22 07:59

Recently I’ve seen an issue with CPU usage on a server running Windows 2003 Server in a VMware. This is a small Virtual Machine with just 2 cores allocated (which are possibly mapped to “threads” on a host level but I don’t know the details). For some reason very high System CPU time was reported in a Statspack report.

Here is how it looks like in a 1 hour Statspack report:

Host CPU  (CPUs: 2  Cores: 2  Sockets: 0)
~~~~~~~~              Load Average
                      Begin     End      User  System    Idle     WIO     WCPU
                    ------- -------   ------- ------- ------- ------- --------
                                         3.04    8.77   88.19

Note that the System CPU time is more than twice the User CPU time on average (remember the averages could be misleading sometimes). This caught my attention as usual. Although the average CPU used is not really high, this server is somewhat sluggish even for a one hop RDP connection over the VPN.
I have tried to find out some details about what is going on. Since I’m not a Windows guy, I did not know what kind of tools could be used to track places in the OS kernel that take too much time. On Linux this is relatively easy starting with strace/pstack/perf utilities and other command line tools. Windows is different.

I’ve started to search for the options available, and the first thing to find is of course Perfmon, which allows to track and visualize different OS related metrics (counters in Perfmon terminology) on a system, CPU, or process levels. I’ve used it to capture a few key metrics such as User Time, System Time (which is apparently called Privileged Time on Windows), Queue length and Context Switches per second. From a graph of the CPU usage the issue is visible:

Here the white line is representing Privileged (or System) CPU, and yellow line is Total CPU. It’s clear that almost all used CPU is accounted to the Privileged part.
By the way it is actually very easy to see a similar picture in a standard Performance tab of Task Manager, you just need to select View then Show Kernel Times and Privileged part of the used CPU will be displayed in red.

After that I have searched for details of where to find why Privileged CPU time is so high. A good article that I have found is here. Although it is relatively old, it fits my case as the OS is a 32 bit Windows 2003 Server. The article points to a tool called KernRates. This is a command line tool with a very easy interface: you run it, wait for some time and stop it with Ctrl-C. After that the tool prints the profile of system calls by module. Here is what I’ve seen:

C:\Program Files\KrView\Kernrates>Kernrate_i386_Win2000.exe
 /==============================\
<         KERNRATE LOG           >
 \==============================/
Date: 2014/09/03   Time: 12:39:21
Machine Name: ***
Number of Processors: 2
PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTURE: x86
PROCESSOR_LEVEL: 6
PROCESSOR_REVISION: 1706
Physical Memory: 3072 MB
Pagefile Total: 6996 MB
Virtual Total: 2047 MB
PageFile1: \??\C:\pagefile.sys, 4080MB
OS Version: 5.2 Build 3790 Service-Pack: 2.0
WinDir: C:\WINDOWS

Kernrate User-Specified Command Line:
Kernrate_i386_Win2000.exe

Kernel Profile (PID = 0): Source= Time,
Using Kernrate Default Rate of 25000 events/hit
Starting to collect profile data

***> Press ctrl-c to finish collecting profile data
===> Finished Collecting Data, Starting to Process Results

------------Overall Summary:--------------

P0     K 0:00:03.703 ( 8.7%)  U 0:00:00.734 ( 1.7%)  I 0:00:38.046 (89.6%)  DPC 0:00:00.031 ( 0.1%)  Interrupt 0:00:00.406 ( 1.0%)
       Interrupts= 22840, Interrupt Rate= 538/sec.

P1     K 0:00:02.343 ( 5.5%)  U 0:00:00.656 ( 1.5%)  I 0:00:39.484 (92.9%)  DPC 0:00:00.000 ( 0.0%)  Interrupt 0:00:00.281 ( 0.7%)
       Interrupts= 20017, Interrupt Rate= 471/sec.

TOTAL  K 0:00:06.046 ( 7.1%)  U 0:00:01.390 ( 1.6%)  I 0:01:17.531 (91.2%)  DPC 0:00:00.031 ( 0.0%)  Interrupt 0:00:00.687 ( 0.8%)
       Total Interrupts= 42857, Total Interrupt Rate= 1009/sec.

Total Profile Time = 42484 msec

                                       BytesStart          BytesStop         BytesDiff.
    Available Physical Memory   ,       372678656,       363945984,        -8732672
    Available Pagefile(s)       ,      3285475328,      3281805312,        -3670016
    Available Virtual           ,      2131267584,      2130219008,        -1048576
    Available Extended Virtual  ,               0,               0,               0

                                  Total      Avg. Rate
    Context Switches     ,        61247,         1442/sec.
    System Calls         ,       305201,         7184/sec.
    Page Faults          ,        58440,         1376/sec.
    I/O Read Operations  ,         3496,         82/sec.
    I/O Write Operations ,         2637,         62/sec.
    I/O Other Operations ,        29567,         696/sec.
    I/O Read Bytes       ,     59649045,         17062/ I/O
    I/O Write Bytes      ,      2653894,         1006/ I/O
    I/O Other Bytes      ,    624604436,         21125/ I/O

-----------------------------

Results for Kernel Mode:
-----------------------------

OutputResults: KernelModuleCount = 109
Percentage in the following table is based on the Total Hits for the Kernel

Time   33235 hits, 25000 events per hit --------
 Module                                Hits   msec  %Total  Events/Sec
intelppm                              30310      42486    91 %    17835286
ntkrnlpa                               2337      42486     7 %     1375158
hal                                     271      42486     0 %      159464
mfehidk01                                74      42486     0 %       43543
Ntfs                                     58      42486     0 %       34128
mfehidk                                  52      42486     0 %       30598
mfeapfk                                  47      42486     0 %       27656
mfeavfk01                                17      42486     0 %       10003
tcpip                                    13      42486     0 %        7649
win32k                                   12      42486     0 %        7061
mfeavfk                                  10      42486     0 %        5884
fltmgr                                    6      42486     0 %        3530
CLASSPNP                                  3      42486     0 %        1765
SCSIPORT                                  3      42486     0 %        1765
RDPDD                                     2      42486     0 %        1176
afd                                       2      42486     0 %        1176
Npfs                                      2      42486     0 %        1176
NDIS                                      2      42486     0 %        1176
symmpi                                    2      42486     0 %        1176
TDTCP                                     1      42486     0 %         588
rdbss                                     1      42486     0 %         588
netbt                                     1      42486     0 %         588
mfetdi2k                                  1      42486     0 %         588
ipsec                                     1      42486     0 %         588
termdd                                    1      42486     0 %         588
TDI                                       1      42486     0 %         588
vmxnet                                    1      42486     0 %         588
KSecDD                                    1      42486     0 %         588
atapi                                     1      42486     0 %         588
volsnap                                   1      42486     0 %         588
ftdisk                                    1      42486     0 %         588

================================= END OF RUN ==================================
============================== NORMAL END OF RUN ==============================

The default output contains some basic information about the system, CPU usage, memory and context switching. The kernel modules profile is the most interesting part here. It lists some modules with internal names and the profile data: number of times the module was running during a sample; this is the most important information. So in mycase intelppm was the top running kernel module.
I’ve searched again, now for intelppm, and found a few posts describing similar symptoms. Apparently intelppm is a CPU driver. Sometimes it causes issues such as BSOD or high CPU usage, especially if it is a cloned VM and CPU architecture changes in between. It was not clear if this something which can be disabled, but there were posts suggesting that stopping this service (which is not listed in Services) helped a few people. So I have recommended the client to try to disable this driver with the following commands:

sc config intelppm start=disabled
sc stop intelppm

Theoretically this should disable Intel CPU driver and Windows should try to use another if it is available. When we tried to run it, the 2nd command (to stop the driver) failed with the following message:

[SC] ControlService FAILED 1052:

The requested control is not valid for this service.

So it is not possible to stop the driver online, and Windows restart is necessary.
We did a restart of the VM. After that, the situation was a bit different: the CPU time was somewhat reduced; but the privileged part was still quite high with hal (Hardware Abstraction Layer) on top instead of intelppm:

Time   95865 hits, 25000 events per hit --------
 Module                                Hits   msec  %Total  Events/Sec
hal                                   82669     125183    86 %    16509629
ntkrnlpa                              11788     125183    12 %     2354153
mfehidk                                 474     125183     0 %       94661
mfeapfk                                 224     125183     0 %       44734
Ntfs                                    207     125183     0 %       41339
vmmemctl                                155     125183     0 %       30954
mfeavfk                                  92     125183     0 %       18373
tcpip                                    85     125183     0 %       16975
win32k                                   54     125183     0 %       10784
fltmgr                                   14     125183     0 %        2795
mfetdi2k                                 11     125183     0 %        2196
TDI                                      10     125183     0 %        1997
RDPWD                                     9     125183     0 %        1797
PartMgr                                   9     125183     0 %        1797
KSecDD                                    7     125183     0 %        1397
SCSIPORT                                  7     125183     0 %        1397
afd                                       6     125183     0 %        1198
symmpi                                    6     125183     0 %        1198
RDPDD                                     5     125183     0 %         998
ipsec                                     5     125183     0 %         998
NDIS                                      5     125183     0 %         998
CLASSPNP                                  5     125183     0 %         998
mfebopk                                   4     125183     0 %         798
Npfs                                      3     125183     0 %         599
termdd                                    3     125183     0 %         599
vmxnet                                    2     125183     0 %         399
volsnap                                   2     125183     0 %         399
ndisuio                                   1     125183     0 %         199
mrxsmb                                    1     125183     0 %         199
rdbss                                     1     125183     0 %         199
atapi                                     1     125183     0 %         199

But in terms of Oracle performance everything changed: everything now run much faster, including simple queries in the SQL*Plus. A particular query started to run 3 times faster on average:

-- stats before
SQL> @sqlstats cp9jr3hp1jupk
                  Elapsed     Ela/exec                            User IO     Rows per   Versi           Share  Avg hard
       Execs            s            s      CPU, s    Gets/exec         s         exec     ons   Loads Mem, MB parse, ms PX Exec
------------ ------------ ------------ ----------- ------------ --------- ------------ ------- ------- ------- --------- -------
         135      170.093        1.260      155.31          835      4.29            1       1       1     .02    350.99       0

-- stats after
SQL> @sqlstats cp9jr3hp1jupk
                  Elapsed     Ela/exec                            User IO     Rows per   Versi           Share  Avg hard
       Execs            s            s      CPU, s    Gets/exec         s         exec     ons   Loads Mem, MB parse, ms PX Exec
------------ ------------ ------------ ----------- ------------ --------- ------------ ------- ------- ------- --------- -------
         604      212.151         .351      154.75        1,013     31.79            1       1       1     .02      8.34       0

It looks like the change helped, but there is no sign that it helped on the OS level. This makes me think that such an improvement in performance may be attributed to something else, such as OS, hypervisor or combination of them and Oracle. In any case, high system time is not good and it usually indicates that something is wrong.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Planning the Perfect Oracle WebCenter Sites 11g Upgrade

WebCenter Team - Wed, 2014-10-22 07:38
By Curtis Fox, CTO at Manifesto Digital

Originally released in 2011, Oracle WebCenter Sites 11g has subsequently had a couple of additional releases which have added lots of new functionality and addressed issues. The latest is 11.1.1.8 (or 11.8 for brevity's sake), and was released in late 2013.

Fatwire 7.6 (the previous version of the product) will be out of Premier Support in early 2016, which means no more Patches, Updates, Fixes, Certification or Tools and no access to other Oracle services for that version of the software.

If you’re using an older 7.x version of the product, and you haven’t already started planning an upgrade to Oracle WebCenter Sites 11g, now’s probably the time to do so.

New Features in Oracle WebCenter Sites 11g
The most recent version provides a raft of new and improved features over the older Fatwire releases. There is new functionality from both business user and developer standpoints. Here’s a high level summary of what you will find:

User interface
The user interface has undergone a total redesign. There are now two distinct interfaces, Contributor and Administrator. Contributor is where editorial folk will do their work. It now has a visual editing capability, including the ability to drag and drop content directly into the page and edit in situ. The interface is now tabbed, allowing for multiple pages to be opened at the same time. It also includes improved search features. Administrator is where your power users and technical folk can work with site design and configuration, publishing, user management, mobile device setup and integrations. 

Mobile Website Support

There are new tools for the development, preview and delivery of mobile websites. For editorial users mobile website support provides a series of device specific previews.This gives users an indication of what the site will look like rendered in a range of devices. There’s also product support for providing device specific templates and Site Plans to allow editorial users to create device specific versions of a site. From an Administrative point of view, you can add new devices and device groups, each with their own user agent and screen sizes to allow users to preview for new device types as they’re released.

Vanity URL Support
There is now out of the box support for producing custom URLs, which used to be a custom development task most implementations needed to undertake. The ability to automatically generate friendly and stable URLs provides editorial users with much greater control over the URLs for assets, which is useful for SEO. It also provides stable URLs for things like downloadable documents - meaning the URL to your annual report won’t change every time you publish it.

3rd Party Integration Framework
The proxy asset framework, new in Oracle WebCenter Sites 11.8, provides an out of the box way to integrate with external content sources, such as YouTube or other video sources, essentially allowing editorial users to drag and drop these videos into pages as they create them.

Engage Interface
The personalisation part of Oracle WebCenter Sites has also undergone an interface redesign, making it easier for editorial staff to create and recommend segmented content to users. With past versions editorial users sometimes found the creation and management process challenging - this update addresses those issues.

Sites Integrations Oracle WebCenter Sites 11.8 provides a number of new integrations with other parts of the Oracle product set. Real-Time Decisions can now be used to return a list of recommendations for a visitor based on their profile and WebCenter Content Connector allows for scheduled syncing of content.

Contributor Framework
Modifications to the core product have historically been problematic, particularly during the upgrade process. This new framework provides a means for developers to customise the product in a supportable, easily upgradable way. Given all the new features it’s definitely worth knowing about and even trialling the new version of the software to see what new functionality is available in Oracle WebCenter Sites 11g. It’ll be useful to see how those features align with both your users’ expectations and your digital and technical strategies.

Managing the Upgrade Process

To ensure that any upgrade is a success, from both business and technical perspectives, a number of essential steps and processes should be considered. 

1. Plan
A good upgrade plan should identify the following phases:

Discovery
  • What benefits will the upgrade bring?
  • Which problems does the upgrade solve?
  • Will the upgrade cause any new problems?
Development
  • What work needs to be done to implement new features?
  • What work needs to be done to preserve current features?
  • What sort of test coverage do we need?
Training
  • What has changed in the product from an end users perspective?
  • How will these changes affect how they perform their day to day work?
Implementation
  • When is the best time to perform the upgrade?
  • Will you need an outage and if so for how long?
  • What happens if something goes wrong? What’s your rollback plan?
Post upgrade support
  • Who does a user talk to if there’s something they can’t work out how to do?

2. Familiarise Yourself with the New Features
How many times have you discovered that the new functionality an upgrade promises isn’t quite what it seems or that you can’t use it immediately because of the way your current system is designed or implemented? Make sure you do your homework and understand at the technical level what the impact of new changes in the product will have on your system.

3. Understand your Key Business User Functionality
Make sure you know which functions of your system are used most by your users and which are fundamental to the ongoing functioning of the business.
If you don’t already have it, think about performing an audit of the functionality the system provides. This information can provide the basis of a contract between the business and the developers performing the upgrade.

4. Provide a Safety Net
Once you’ve got a handle on your current functionality and the impact of the new product upgrade it’s time to get your developers some protection. Whether it’s manual or automated you should make sure you have some test coverage of your key business user functionality.

5. Customisations

One of the big barriers to upgrading earlier versions of the Fatwire product was how customisations to the product itself behaved. Each change made to the product needed to be assessed against the upgraded version and a choice made about how to fold it back in to the upgraded product. Oracle WebCenter Sites 11g has much better support for customisations that survive upgrades – but if you’re coming from an earlier version of the product you should make sure that all the changes that have been made to the core application are documented and assessed. This is also an area in which having some test coverage is a boon.


6. Make End User Training a Core Part of the Program
Particularly if the changes an upgrade brings are large – and the leap from the old Fatwire product to WebCenter Sites 11g certainly is – you should make end user training a core part of your programme. It’s easy to forget how disruptive large changes to a piece of software can be. If there’s a new way of doing something within the product or you’re asking users to change how they think about how their content is structured or produced, then you should take steps to help soften that blow.

7. Practice Makes Perfect
Practice running the upgrade against a ‘real’ environment – the closer you can get your test upgrade environment to the real thing, the more issues you’ll catch early in the process. Make sure the upgrade process is described in step by step detail – each time you practice the upgrade make sure that you follow your own instructions. The first few times you’ll find small errors or additions that need to be documented. For the real upgrade you want to make the process as easy to follow as possible.

About the Author
Curtis Fox is the CTO at Manifesto Digital. He's a solution architect with a wealth of experience who's created publishing solutions for organizations across the globe. His recent projects include launching the National Trust’s website on a new platform and working with Avios on product upgrades. Before helping to found Manifesto Curtis was a Senior Principal Consultant at Oracle for Web Experience Management.

RDX Services: Proactive Monitoring [VIDEO]

Chris Foot - Wed, 2014-10-22 07:29

Transcript

Hi, welcome to RDX. When a mission-critical system becomes unavailable, it can threaten the survivability of an organization. That’s why RDX has a Database Operations Center team responsible for the proactive monitoring of all clients’ environments, 24×7.

Our monitors are custom tailored for every environment we support, and our specialists are trained in database and operating system problem resolution. This combination delivers peace of mind for our clients when they know the Database Operation Center is watching out for their highly available, high performance, and mission-critical environments. If a major problem does transpire, our experts notify the client immediately – creating a game plan on how to resolve the situation.

Thanks for watching! Next time, we'll discuss our platform-specific solutions.

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