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Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Farming Terbaru

Daniel Fink - Thu, 2015-10-01 20:56
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Farming Terbaru - Pada kesempatan kali ini saya akan membagikan base town hall 8 farming terbaru dengan air sweaper yang mana kita ketahui bahwa base th 8 dimana kita akan menemukan hal-hal baru pada clash of clans ini. Base th 8 terbaik bisa kalian buat dengan mudah caranya adalah dari base kita, yap tentu saja bila base kita lemah setiap lawan yang menyerang pasti akan menghancur leburkan base th 8 kita. Nahh untuk itu kamu bisa membuat base th 8 terkuat dengan meniru gambar base th 8 terbaru dibawah ini karena memang sudah teruji ketahanannya dari serangan darat maupun udara namun dengan catatan musuh setara dengan kita.

Di sini saya sudah merangkum berbagai jenis formasi base th 8 yang bisa digunakan untuk Town Hall 8. Susunan formasi (layout) base Town Hall 8 ini memiliki beberapa tipe. Tipe-tipe base Town Hall 8 antara lain: Base town hall 8 Farming, Base town hall 8 Farming/Trophy, Base town hall 8 Hybrid, Base town hall 8 Clan War.
Base TH 8 FarmingMaksimal Struktur : 6 Level 12 Gold Mines, 6 Level 12 Elixir Collectors, 2 Level 3 Dark Elixir Drills, 3 Level 11 Gold Storages, 3 Level 11 Elixir Storages, 1 Level 4 Dark Elixir Storage, 2 Level 4 Dark Barracks, 4 Level 10 Barracks, 4 Level 6 Army Camps, 1 Level 6 Laboratory, 1 Level 3 Spell Factory, 1 Level 4 Clan Castle

Maksimal Farming : 5 Level 10 Cannons, 5 Level 10 Archer Towers, 225 Level 8 Walls, 4 Level 6 Mortars, 6 Level 5 Bombs, 3 Level 6 Air Farmings, 6 Spring Traps, 3 Level 6 Wizard Towers, 3 Level 3 Giant Bombs, 4 Level 3 Air Bombs, 2 Level 1 Seeking Air Mines, 2 Level 2 Skeleton Traps, 3 Level 6 Hidden Teslas

Heroes : 1 Level 10 Barbarian King
Base TH 8 Farming TerbaruKumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Farming Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Farming Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Farming Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Farming Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Farming Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Farming Terbaru
Nahhh, itulah beberapa gambar base town hall 8 semoga bisa bermanfaat untuk kalian semua tentang base town hall 8 farming terbaru 2015, selamat mendesain dan berkreasi!

Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru

Daniel Fink - Thu, 2015-10-01 20:46
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru - Pada kesempatan kali ini saya akan membagikan base town hall 8 defense terbaru yang mana kita ketahui bahwa base th 8 dimana kita akan menemukan hal-hal baru pada clash of clans ini. Base th 8 terbaik bisa kalian buat dengan mudah caranya adalah dari base kita, yap tentu saja bila base kita lemah setiap lawan yang menyerang pasti akan menghancur leburkan base th 8 kita. Nahh untuk itu kamu bisa membuat base th 8 terkuat dengan meniru gambar base th 8 terbaru dibawah ini karena memang sudah teruji ketahanannya dari serangan darat maupun udara namun dengan catatan musuh setara dengan kita.

Di sini saya sudah merangkum berbagai jenis formasi base th 8 yang bisa digunakan untuk Town Hall 8. Susunan formasi (layout) base Town Hall 8 ini memiliki beberapa tipe. Tipe-tipe base Town Hall 8 antara lain: Base town hall 8 Farming, Base town hall 8 Defense/Trophy, Base town hall 8 Hybrid, Base town hall 8 Clan War.
Base TH 8 DefenseMaksimal Struktur : 6 Level 12 Gold Mines, 6 Level 12 Elixir Collectors, 2 Level 3 Dark Elixir Drills, 3 Level 11 Gold Storages, 3 Level 11 Elixir Storages, 1 Level 4 Dark Elixir Storage, 2 Level 4 Dark Barracks, 4 Level 10 Barracks, 4 Level 6 Army Camps, 1 Level 6 Laboratory, 1 Level 3 Spell Factory, 1 Level 4 Clan Castle

Maksimal Defense : 5 Level 10 Cannons, 5 Level 10 Archer Towers, 225 Level 8 Walls, 4 Level 6 Mortars, 6 Level 5 Bombs, 3 Level 6 Air Defenses, 6 Spring Traps, 3 Level 6 Wizard Towers, 3 Level 3 Giant Bombs, 4 Level 3 Air Bombs, 2 Level 1 Seeking Air Mines, 2 Level 2 Skeleton Traps, 3 Level 6 Hidden Teslas

Heroes : 1 Level 10 Barbarian King

Base TH 8 Defense TerbaruKumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Kumpulan Base Town Hall 8 Defense Terbaru
Nahhh, itulah beberapa gambar base town hall 8 semoga bisa bermanfaat untuk kalian semua tentang base town hall 8 defense terbaru 2015, selamat mendesain dan berkreasi!

What I Wanted to Tell Terry Bradshaw

Cary Millsap - Thu, 2015-10-01 16:23
I met Terry Bradshaw one time. It was about ten years ago, in front of a movie theater near where I live.

When I was little, Terry Bradshaw was my enemy because, unforgivably to a young boy, he and his Pittsburgh Steelers kept beating my beloved Dallas Cowboys in Super Bowls. As I grew up, though, his personality on TV talk shows won me over, and I enjoy watching him to this day on Fox NFL Sunday. After learning a little bit about his life, I’ve grown to really admire and respect him.

I had heard that he owned a ranch not too far from where I live, and so I had it in mind that inevitably I would meet him someday, and I would say thank you. One day I had that chance.

I completely blew it.

My wife and I saw him there at the theater one day, standing by himself not far from us. It seemed like if I were to walk over and say hi, maybe it wouldn’t bother him. So I walked over, a little bit nervous. I shook his hand, and I said, “Mr. Bradshaw, hi, my name is Cary.” I would then say this:

I was a big Roger Staubach fan growing up. I watched Cowboys vs. Steelers like I was watching Good vs. Evil.

But as I’ve grown up, I have gained the deepest admiration and respect for you. You were a tremendous competitor, and you’re one of my favorite people to see on TV. Every time I see you, you bring a smile to my face. You’ve brought joy to a lot of people.

I just wanted to say think you.
Yep, that’s what I would say to Terry Bradshaw if I got the chance. But that’s not how it would turn out. How it actually went was like this, …my big chance:

Me: I was a big Roger Staubach fan growing up.
TB: Hey, so was I!
Me: (stunned)
TB: (turns away)
The End
I was heartbroken. It bothers me still today. If you know Terry Bradshaw or someone who does, I wish you would please let him know. It would mean a lot to me.

…I did learn something that day about the elevator pitch.

My Sales Journey: #5

Pythian Group - Thu, 2015-10-01 13:49

I am a little sad to let go of the Life of a newly minted Sales Professional title today but happy that I am starting to develop a bit of a patina. My Sales Journey reflects my state of mind right now and feels more appropriate given the fact that today marks the end of my first month at Pythian!

Last week we explored social media and where people are building their online habitats. Today, lets journey inside the minds of these people to see what they think. Let me explain.

As a sales professional for a managed service I talk to decision makers and stakeholders. My job is to engage them and hopefully they will want to take the conversation one step further. For all this to happen I need to know what their responsibilities, their pain points and their challenges are.

So today lets step inside the mind of a VP/Director/Executive:

They are responsible for ensuring the continual functioning of mission critical operations. They have to stay relevant while bridging the gap between business and technology. They are in charge of driving innovation and improving profitability. They are also tasked with delivering flexible strategies that enable business to deliver high quality/valuable services.

Now that I know this on a broad level I can be more effective with my message. This week has been all about creating/assembling content that answers to these challenges and responsibilities. These can come in the form of white papers, relevant marketing, team resumes, cost analysis and slide decks.

Know their industry and purchasing cycles. This is a research heavy task but pays off when you have a carefully curated list that you can refer to. It becomes a powerful weapon in your sales arsenal.

Sleuth enough information to determine initial feasibility. Your first contact is twice as likely to be successful if you have qualified the type of messaging with their current challenge.

As you can tell, lots of learning happened in the last week. I hope some of these tips will help you with your outreach. Stay tuned next week when we step in to the mind of a manager who may be lower on the rung but can be a key person to land your message in front of the decision makers.

Now, It is Friday and time to kick back and relax with a team lunch! My second one in 4 weeks! Yessirrrr, that is how we roll at Pythian. See you next week!


Categories: DBA Blogs

Oracle Priority Support Infogram for 01-OCT-2015

Oracle Infogram - Thu, 2015-10-01 13:42

No OS Authentication? datapatch will fail in every upgrade, from Upgrade your Database - NOW!
A Surprising Program, from Oracle Database PL/SQL and EBR.
Data Warehouse
DOP Downgrades, or Avoid The Ceiling, from The Data Warehouse Insider blog.
Multi Data Source Configuration for Database Outages, from The WebLogic Server Blog.
Evaluating HTM for pauseless garbage collectors in Java, from David Dice’s Weblog.
Creating Games with JavaFX 8: Case Study, from The Java Tutorials Blog.
The 10 most recently created notes for OAG as of 24 Sept. 2015., from Proactive Support - Java Development using Oracle Tools.
Ops Center
Changing an Asset's Name, from the Oracle Ops Center blog.
Data Integration
Defining and Implementing a Realistic Data Governance Strategy – Webcast Recap, from the Data Integration blog.
Top tweets SOA Partner Community – September 2015, from the the SOA & BPM Partner Community Blog.
Real User Monitoring
How to Configure Used ID Identification, from Real User Monitoring.
Solaris: Identifying EFI disks, from Giri Mandalika's Repository.
From the Oracle E-Business Suite Support blog:
EBS General Ledger - Accounting Hub Reporting Cloud Service
ATTN: BI Publisher has a SIG Meeting at Oracle Open World 2015
New! Journal Approvals Integrated With Oracle Approvals Management and Oracle Workflow!
Finally Eliminate Those Duplicate WIP Transactions!

Rise of the Robots - Review

Abhinav Agarwal - Thu, 2015-10-01 10:08
Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future
Martin Ford

Part 1 of 3

"I'm smart; you're dumb. I'm big; you're small. I'm right; you're wrong. And there's nothing you can do about it."

Thus spake Harry Wormwood in the movie "Matilda". This well could be the message that robots will have for us in the not too distant future. The dramatic improvements in the speed, the accuracy, and the areas in which computers have begun to comprehensively outperform humans leads one to believe that while a so-called singularity may well be some ways off, the more immediate effects of this automation are already being felt in permanent job losses. In a country like India, which has used digital technologies quite effectively in the last decade and a half to grow a $150 billion IT-BPM industry, the impact could be devastating - especially where an estimated 10 million people are employed.
In many spheres - chess for example - they could utter these lines to us humans today and there's nothing we can do about it - for the computer is right. The puniest of computers in the tiniest of smartphones possesses enough computing horsepower and smart-enough algorithms (written by us humans - oh yes, the irony!) to defeat the best of us humans in chess, every single time, without breaking a sweat. Computers have been able to add, subtract, divide, square, multiply faster and more accurately than us for decades now, and there's nothing we can do about that either.

From the time of the Luddites - who rose up against the machines of the Industrial Revolution in the early years of the nineteenth century - to the present-day "Judgment Day" Sarah Connor avatars, inspired as much by an acute awareness of the march of technology as by James Cameroon's "Terminator" movies, the refrain of the chorus has been more or less unchanging: the machines are coming for our jobs, our livelihoods, and will finally come for us (the Matrix was premised on a variant of one such dystopian future). Computing power of computers exploded in the second half of the twentieth century, obeying the inexorable pull of Moore's Law, and made feasible by advances in semiconductors, fabrication techniques, and electrical engineering. As did fears that similar software advances could somehow endow machines with intelligence - Artificial Intelligence. These fears however did not quite come to pass. For several decades, there were several false hopes and starts that were kindled and then extinguished. Till this decade. The congruence of seemingly infinite computing power - thanks to massive server farms running in the "cloud" (a mangled metaphor if ever there was one), cheap and lightning fast bandwidth available on tap, storage and memory that keeps getting impossibly cheaper every year, and sophisticated software algorithms - has however made it clear that "machine intelligence" is no longer an oxymoron. We are well and truly living in the middle of the machine age. The "singularity" may well be witnessed in our lifetimes, within a decade or two even.

Martin Ford's book, "The Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future" lays out the case for a not-so-distant future where machines make possible the automation of almost every task imaginable, but at a great social and economic cost. The book is neatly organized, lucidly argued, and except for a lengthy and somewhat incongruous chapter on the medical system, the book stays on point. Ford makes it clear that neither is this technological progress reversible, nor wholly desirable. Its consequences therefore cannot be wished away - income inequality as an example, which economists for three decades have been explaining away as a temporary anomaly. The last section, which is more contemplative and prescriptive, as opposed to the earlier sections which are descriptive, discusses possible solutions, some of which will shock free market proponents. Whether there are more practical, workable answers is quite another thing though.

Part 2 of 3

Machines have been able to do mechanical jobs faster than humans, with greater precision, and for longer periods of time - the cotton gin invented in the eighteenth century for example. The inevitable loss of jobs called for a re-skilling of the people affected, and the mantra went that you had to pull yourself up by your socks, learn a new skill, and get productive again. Martin Ford's book shatters that illusion. There is not a single profession left - whether unskilled or skilled, whether in technology or medicine or liberal arts, whether one that can be performed remotely or requires direct human interaction - that is not at threat from the machines. Whichever way you slice and dice it, you are left facing one or the other variation of a dystopian future, with stark income inequalities, a substantial population that will require doles on a permanent doles, and the concomitant social upheavals.

Some years back, when offshoring was in the news and concerns about its impact on US jobs was at its peak, with hundreds of thousands of jobs moved offshore to countries like India, there were stories coming out regularly, like the one about Southern California workers being made to train H1-B visa holders, many of whom took over their jobs. Pfizer made "hundreds of tech workers at its Connecticut R&D facilities" train their replacements - guest workers from India. If the economics of labor cost arbitrage precipitated the migration of skilled technology jobs away from the United States and to countries like India (being "Bangalored" entered the urban lexicon only a decade ago), technology could plausibly bring those jobs back to the United States - call it "reshoring". The quantum of jobs reshored, however, is going to be a massive disappointment. Consider this: "In 2011, the Washington Post’s Michael Rosenwald reported that a colossal, billion-dollar data center built by Apple, Inc., in the town of Maiden, North Carolina, had created only fifty full-time positions." But it is precisely this elimination of the need for many people that makes the economics of reshoring work out. Ironical.

While the United States can at least look forward to the reshoring of some jobs lost to manufacturing in China or services in India, the loss of such jobs is certain, on the other hand, to cause greater upheaval in these offshore countries. India's socio-economic progress is predicated in great deal on a re-skilling of its labour force to take advantage of an emerging "Digital India" both in the manufacturing and services sector, but which is in mortal danger of being blindsided by the rise of the machines. The use of IT-based services as a catalyst for driving economic growth in smaller - Tier B and Tier C - cities in India is a recurrent theme for planners. But this could be short-circuited by the rise of the robots, who, once trained - by humans - can perform the jobs of humans, better, and faster. Indians were trained by their American counterparts to do their jobs. Unbeknownst to many, these people are actors in the same offshoring saga that played out a decade ago, but with the proverbial shoe on the other foot now. "The bottom line is that if you find yourself working with, or under the direction of, a smart software system, it’s probably a pretty good bet that—whether you’re aware of it or not—you are also training the software to ultimately replace you."

India has been a spectacular laggard when it has come to industrializing its economy - it is probably unique among all developing nations to be progressing (or at least with ambitions of progressing) from a primarily agrarian economy to a services-based economy, skipping substantially the intermediate phase of industrialization that every single industrialized nation went through last century. It was industrialization that provided the bedrock for the middle-class in nations, which then aspired towards a better quality of life, with the ability to pay for it - thus driving the move towards a services-based economy. For India, it could be argued by some that this skipping may prove to be a blessing, since an industrialized economy is more susceptible to efficiencies wrought by advancements in technology. Consider these examples from Ford's book:

1. "in the United States, chickens are grown to standardized sizes so as to make them compatible with automated slaughtering and processing."

2. Momentum Machines, a San Francisco based startup has developed a machine that "shapes burgers from freshly ground meat and then grills them to order - including even the ability to add just the right amount of char while retaining all the juices. The machine, which is capable of producing about 360 hamburgers per hour, also toasts the bun and then slices and adds fresh ingredients like tomatoes, onions, and pickles only after the order is placed." The company's co-founder is clear that these machines are not "meant to make employees more efficient... It's meant to completely obviate them."

3. "Vision Robotics, a company based in San Diego, California, is developing an octopus-like orange harvesting machine. The robot will use three-dimensional machine vision to make a computer model of an entire orange tree and then store the location of each fruit. That information will then be passed on to the machine’s eight robotic arms, which will rapidly harvest the oranges."

4. "Researchers at Facebook have likewise developed an experimental system—consisting of nine levels of artificial neurons—that can correctly determine whether two photographs are of the same person 97.25 percent of the time, even if lighting conditions and orientation of the faces vary. That compares with 97.53 percent accuracy for human observers."

5. "A Facebook executive noted in November 2013 that the Cyborg system routinely solves thousands of problems that would otherwise have to be addressed manually, and that the technology allows a single technician to manage as many as 20,000 computers."

6. If reading certain news articles makes you wonder whether a robot wrote it, things are going to get better - or worse. Computer algorithms are at work to churn out articles that will be indistinguishable from those written by humans. Liberal arts became even more unviable - if ever that was possible.
"In 2010, the Northwestern University researchers who oversaw the team of computer science and journalism students who worked on StatsMonkey raised venture capital and founded a new company, Narrative Science, Inc., to commercialize the technology. The company hired a team of top computer scientists and engineers; then it tossed out the original StatsMonkey computer code and built a far more powerful and comprehensive artificial intelligence engine that it named “Quill.”
... One of Narrative Science’s earliest backers was In-Q-Tel, the venture capital arm of the Central Intelligence Agency"

"To keep instructional costs down, colleges are relying ever more heavily on part-time, or adjunct, faculty who are paid on a per-course basis—in some cases as little as $2,500 for a semester-long class—and receive no employee benefits. Especially in the liberal arts, these adjunct positions have become dead-end jobs for huge numbers of PhD graduates who once hoped for tenure-track academic careers."
7. "Radiologists, for example, are trained to interpret the images that result from various medical scans. Image processing and recognition technology is advancing rapidly and may soon be able to usurp the radiologist’s traditional role."

8. "In July 2012, the London Symphony Orchestra performed a composition entitled Transits—Into an Abyss. One reviewer called it “artistic and delightful.” The event marked the first time that an elite orchestra had played music composed entirely by a machine. The composition was created by Iamus, a cluster of computers running a musically inclined artificial intelligence algorithm."

9. "Perhaps the most remarkable elder-care innovation developed in Japan so far is the Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL)—a powered exoskeleton suit straight out of science fiction. Developed by Professor Yoshiyuki Sankai of the University of Tsukuba, the HAL suit is the result of twenty years of research and development. Sensors in the suit are able to detect and interpret signals from the brain. When the person wearing the battery-powered suit thinks about standing up or walking, powerful motors instantly spring into action, providing mechanical assistance. A version is also available for the upper body and could assist caretakers in lifting the elderly. Wheelchair-bound seniors have been able to stand up and walk with the help of HAL."

As one goes over these examples, it becomes obvious that automation is a sword that cuts both ways. Is India equipped - and more importantly, are the planners aware - to handle the flood of automation that could wash away entire swathes of jobs being dreamed up by ambitions of a digitally-enabled nation?

Part 3 of 3

As 2014 drew to a close, the Indian IT industry was rocked by rumours that TCS (the largest Indian IT company by annual revenues) had completed an internal review and had initiated lay offs of thousands of employees - mostly in middle management. Some stories talked about a number as high as 30,000. The saga finally ended with a round of clarifications and denials by TCS and some well-deserved opprobrium over its inept handling of the needless controversy. What the fracas however served to highlight was a stark truth that's been staring at the Indian IT industry for some time now - the skills that the typical Indian IT worker possesses are mostly undifferentiated and prime candidates for automation.
What is worse, from at least one perspective, is the fact that (smart) humans have built technology that has becoming adept at "engineering the labor out of the product." One will need to be particularly myopic to not also recognize that "the machines are coming for the higher-skill jobs as well." This much should have been clear in part two of this series, through the examples I cited from Martin Ford's book.
One recurring theme in Martin Ford's book, "Rise of the Robots", at least in the initial chapters, is the permanence and acceleration of offshoring to countries like India, which he believes, "has built a major, nationally strategic industry specifically geared toward the electronic capture of American and European jobs." (As an aside, most Indians would be somewhat puzzled by this assertion, given at times the outright hostility which politicians in India display towards the IT industry, like the time when a former prime minister indirectly accused the Bangalore IT industry of "immoral, unethical and illegal prosperity"!) Anyway, leaving that aside aside, in advancing his argument Ford posits that as "powerful AI-based tools make it easier for offshore workers to compete with their higher-paid counterparts in developed countries, advancing technology is also likely to upend many of our most basic assumptions about which types of jobs are potentially offshorable. Nearly everyone believes, for example, that occupations that require physical manipulation of the environment will always be safe."

Ford believes that the development of a digital infrastructure in India and the advancement of AI and related technologies will make things worse for US (and Europe) jobs. True to some extent though that may be, you have to consider the fact that increasing automation makes it cheaper and less labor-intensive to maintain, run, and patch-and-upgrade software applications. Furthermore, any offshoring of jobs adds its own overheads by way of administrative and managerial redundancies that cannot be done away with. Automation efficiencies reduce the need for labour, which is the often the single biggest component in any software application over its entire life. Therefore, the very factors that Ford fears are threatening to make offshoring permanent and more widespread are also likely to make reshoring financially viable. It's a sword that cuts both ways.

To be fair, the digital economy in India has a lot of headroom to grow; especially as the Indian government's Smart City initiative brings e-governance and services to the common man through the Internet and technologies. This could well provide a second wind to the Indian IT industry for a decade or more.

However, it is a smart strategy to keep one eye on the what the winds of such a digital nirvana may blow in. An indicator of the direction in which the Indian IT job market is likely to evolve therefore can be found by looking at the US, where the "propensity for the economy to wipe out solid middle-skill, middle-class jobs, and then to replace them with a combination of low-wage service jobs and high-skill, professional jobs that are generally unattainable for most of the workforce, has been dubbed "job market polarization.""
This phrase - "job market polarization" should give us a fair indication of what is in store for the hundreds of thousands, even millions, of graduates in India, many of whom emerge today out of college with a stark degree of antipathy for doing the "9-5" grind that they saw their parents and its generation go through. Digital "start-up" nirvana beckons for them. Each sees himself as a digital entrepreneur of the new economy. They are ready to chuck the "dependable income stream that anchors them into the middle-class" - they view it not as an "anchor" but more a millstone. However, the vast majority is likely to find itself stuck in what "techno visionary" Jared Lanier calls the "informal economy that is found in third-world nations." It's a tiny minority that will "live at the extreme left of the long tail" of such a digital economy. For every Flipkart or SnapDeal (the final word on that fairy-tale saga is yet to be written), you will find tens of thousands of resellers at the other end of the payoff tail, paying these e-tailers money every month for the privilege of selling on their platforms, at prices that barely cover operating costs.

The Indian middle-class, for all its flaws, has represented for decades an aspirational lodestar for the vast majority of the country's poor. So what happens when the digital economy hollows out the middle of the job market - "job polarization" as described above? Again, we can look westwards for possible answers.
"In an analysis published in February 2014, MIT economist James Poterba found that a remarkable 50 percent of American households aged sixty-five to sixty-nine have retirement account balances of $5,000 or less. According to Poterba’s paper, even a household with $100,000 in retirement savings would receive a guaranteed income of only about $5,400 per year (or $450 per month) with no cost-of-living increases, if the entire balance were used to purchase a fixed annuity."In other words, in the absence of both a retirement corpus and a government guaranteed pension, there is a real risk of an emergent middle-class sliding right back into the working poor or even the underclass - a recipe for social unrest.
An inevitable counter-argument to all this unease generated by the "rise of the robots" is the "humans are underrated" palliative. Championing this is Tom Davenport (of "Competing on Analytics" fame) who now talks of "amplified intelligence" (which unfortunately has more the stench of a seo-optimized buzzword than anything substantial at this point) - where "smart" humans work to "augment" "smart" machines. Then there is also Geoff Colvin, who penned the insightful 2008 book, "Talent Is Overrated", and who has returned with "Humans Are Overrated". I have yet to read Colvin's latest book, so judgment day is reserved on the book, but to Davenport's argument, some of the evidence suggests an easy refutation - "In his 2007 book Super Crunchers, Yale University professor Ian Ayres cites study after study showing that algorithmic approaches routinely outperform human experts. When people, rather than computers, are given overall control of the process, the results almost invariably suffer." In many fields where algorithms rule the roost, to argue for human "augmentation" or "amplification" is no better than to argue for more cooks to brew the broth - we know that aphorism, don't we?
In conclusion, and in many ways, the saga documented in "Rise of the Robots" calls to mind the ancient Indian tale of the four friends:
In ancient India there lived four friends. Three of them were very learned, while the fourth was a simpleton, even considered a fool. The four decided to go to the capital and seek their fortune from the king. Along the way, while passing through a jungle, they came across the bones of a lion long dead. The first friend used his knowledge to assemble the bones into a skeleton. The second friend used his skills to fashion a skin over the skeleton, while the third prepared to bring the lion back to life. At this the fourth friend - the simpleton - warned his other three friends of the perils of doing so, and was roundly rebuked by the three, wiser friends. The simpleton again warned them and upon being ignored, climbed a tree for safety. The third friend used his knowledge to breathe life into the lion. I don't need to tell you how this tale ended for the three wise men.

And I will end here.

Buying Info:Hardcover: 352 pagesPublisher: Basic Books (May 5, 2015)ISBN-10: 0465059996ISBN-13: 978-0465059997

US: Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future
India: Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future

The first part was first published in PerformanceGurus on 8th August, 2015.
The second part was first published in PerformanceGurus on 13th August, 2015.
The concluding part was first published in PerformanceGurus on 15th August, 2015.

 © 2015, Abhinav Agarwal (अभिनव अग्रवाल). All rights reserved.

Generate 11g password hash

Laurent Schneider - Thu, 2015-10-01 09:14

An easy way to generate a value string from the ssl is to use openssl

Let’s take a random salt of ABCDEFGHIJ. The length of 10 is important.

The hexadecimal representation is -41-42-43-44-45-46-47-48-49-4A-

$ echo "SafePassw0rDABCDEFGHIJ\c" | openssl dgst -sha1
(stdin)= 47cc4102144d6e479ef3d776ccd9e0d0158842bb

With this hash, I can construct my value

SQL> create user testuser identified by values 'S:47CC4102144D6E479EF3D776CCD9E0D0158842BB4142434445464748494A';

User created.

SQL> grant create session to testuser;

Grant succeeded.

SQL> conn testuser/SafePassw0rD

If you prefer PL/SQL over shell, use DBMS_CRYPTO

SQL> exec dbms_output.put_line('S:'||dbms_crypto.hash(utl_raw.cast_to_raw('SafePassw0rDABCDEFGHIJ'),dbms_crypto.HASH_SH1)||utl_raw.cast_to_raw('ABCDEFGHIJ'))

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

In 12c there is also a “T” String. According to the doc
The cryptographic hash function used for generating the 12C verifier is based on a de-optimized algorithm involving PBKDF2 and SHA-512.

Hybrid Cloud Management

OracleApps Epicenter - Thu, 2015-10-01 08:41
Here is Youtube video for more insights on Hybrid Cloud Management   :)
Categories: APPS Blogs

IBM Bluemix - Triggerring backing service creation from "Deploy to Bluemix" button

Pas Apicella - Thu, 2015-10-01 07:01
I recently posted about the "Deploy to Bluemix" button which will automatically deploy an application into IBM Bluemix from a single click.

If the application requires backing services they can automatically be created using the"declared-services" tag as shown below. Declared services are a manifest extension, which creates or looks for the required or optional services that are expected to be set up before the app is deployed, such as a data cache service. You can find a list of the eligible Bluemix services, labels, and plans by using the CF Command Line Interface and running cf marketplace


    label: rediscloud
    plan: 30mb
 - name: pas-sbsessions
   memory: 512M
   instances: 2
   path: ./target/SpringBootHTTPSession-0.0.1-SNAPSHOT.jar
   host: pas-sbsessions
   buildpack: java_buildpack
    - redis-session

Note: Declared services is an IBM extension of the standard Cloud Foundry manifest format. This extension might be revised in a future release as the feature evolves and improves.
Categories: Fusion Middleware

My Journey from Content Administrator to a Solution Consultant and the Lessons Learned

WebCenter Team - Thu, 2015-10-01 05:00

Guest post by Scott Smith, Redstone Content Solutions Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

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I had the opportunity, about eight years ago, to transition into a role where I was administering Oracle WebCenter Content installations. I learned a lot over the next several years about Oracle, and their partner community.

When I first became our company’s Oracle WebCenter Content Administrator, we had four production servers (clustered into two – two server domains) running WebCenter Content 10g. As of one year ago – there are ten servers (clustered into five – two server domains) running WebCenter Content 11g.

We expanded the number of content items from just over 320,000 to more than 7,000,000 and Oracle WebCenter allowed us to scale easily. Oracle and an Oracle partner helped us through the growth transition.

This growth resulted in some challenges to ensure that the system was always running at its peak capability. As the system expanded to accommodate new functionality and metadata requirements, the need to rebuild the Oracle WebCenter Content index became a daunting task. With regular index rebuilds, the search speeds were acceptable, but not always optimal. We never considered an alternate platform since we knew that we were running the most robust and easily configurable system on the market. We had to learn to manage the expectations for how often we could rebuild the index and what could be expected in terms of search speed from complex searches.

As my career has transitioned and progressed, today I find myself “on the other side” of the fence. I have indeed joined the world of consulting with the very Oracle partner I had come to rely on in my "previous" life.

I now find myself in the position of being envious of those system administrators we serve today. The current release of Distributed Index (DI), from Redstone Content Solutions, has eliminated the need to manage expectations related to index rebuild and search times. Distributed Index integrates with Oracle WebCenter Content (it has been designated by Oracle as an Oracle Validated Integration). DI is an integration that allows an Oracle WebCenter Content Administrator to define and build multiple indexes against their content repository. These indexes can be distributed across hardware that is independent from the current Oracle WebCenter Content architecture. This further reduces search times and index rebuild times.

Some of the features and benefits include:

  • Faceted search
  • Ability to set-up multiple/individual indices based on profiles (See Image)
  • Horizontal and vertical scalability
  • Multi-threaded rebuild
  • Add and search content during a rebuild
  • Create and build an index without restarting the content server
  • Robust administrative page for maintenance of indices
    • Provides real-time feedback on status of an index and ETA on rebuild completion (See Image)
As my career continues to progress, I am excited about the possibilities that exist. I can help companies progress beyond what they thought was possible. They can continue to expand their use of Oracle WebCenter, and the tremendous functionality that it offers. The ability to provide support and solutions that bolster the return on investment for Oracle WebCenter customers is just one of the many reasons why I see a bright future in our partnership with Oracle.

Do not forget to utilize those partners who have experience and can help guide you with proven services and solutions that can smooth out those little bumps on the road to success.

To learn more about Redstone Content Solutions and Distributed Index, please follow the links below, or join us at Oracle OpenWorld 15 where we will be co-hosting this year’s Oracle WebCenter Appreciation Event.

For more details on the event and how to register, please see here.

You can also leverage the following resources to dig deeper into the combined solution:

Emerson Live Webcast Recording

Distributed Index in Action Demo

About the author:

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

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Scott Smith is a WebCenter Consultant with Redstone Content Solutions. Scott has held a number of positions over his 30+ year career. Most recently, before joining Redstone, he spent 10 years with School Specialty Inc., where he was a Project Manager, Business Analyst, ETL Specialist, and Content Engineer.

/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii- mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi- mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

Once A Week Is Never Enough

Rittman Mead Consulting - Thu, 2015-10-01 04:48

Over the last few months we have been looking at User Engagement and recently asked people take part in a global usage survey so we could create a series of benchmark metrics detailing how organisations used OBIEE.

We had a great response and have started to process the data. One of the first things that struck us was that the average user logs into their OBIEE system about once per week.



We derive the once per week figure from the DAU/MAU metric we have talked about here and here. DAU/MAU shows us the % of your user community repeatably using the tool – so a kind of stickiness metric.

DAU and MAU stand for Daily Average Users and Monthly Average Users and are the unique number of users who login and use the system over the period. The definition of DAU/MAU we are using is (30 day moving average of DAU)/(MAU) – using a moving average levels out any usage spikes on particular days of the week.

The reason this measure is significant is that is tells us of how integrated the system is into people’s (working) lives. If you believe that the information in your OBIEE system is invaluable to your employees carrying out their jobs, then you would expect your DAU/MAU to tend to 100%.

Note: DAU/MAU won’t identify users who don’t into your system at all, there is an assumption that they will login at least once over the period of a month. If this is not happening then you have an adoption problem, not an engagement problem.

Is More Engagement Better?

My view is that the higher the engagement in the system, the more valuable the system is. So the questions become whether one visit per week enough; what does good look like; and what did you expect when you designed the system?

If you follow this reasoning, then we could assume that if we could get people using their OBIEE systems more, then their organisations would be better off.

Raising Engagement

We have previous discussed 5 levers that we think drive user engagement:

  • User interface and user experience
  • Quality, relevance, and confidence in data
  • Performance
  • Ability to use the system
  • Accessibility – is the system available in the right way, at the right time?

I want to talk about a couple of them here and how they can effect engagement.

User Interface And User Experience

We have been looking at report and dashboard design for a while now and believe that every dashboard should tell a story. When a user goes to a screen it must support the job they are doing. This means that dashboards have to be designed first and foremost focusing on user’s business processes. We see too many dashboards that contain loosely coupled sets of data that developers thought should be in the same place.

If you need to understand what data a user or analyst needs to do their job, then observe them, look which reports and spreadsheets they use, follow their eyes to see which cells on the various tables they monitor. Are they looking at trends, comparisions or exceptions?

We cover this in depth through the Visual Redesign phase of our User Engagement Service.

The following quote is from one of our client who has used the service:

The new designs provide a simple and at the same time powerful view of data.

Quality, relevance, and confidence in data

However good your dashboard and report design is, if the underlying data is incorrect or inconsistent, or if the user thinks it is, then the system will not be valuable. Users will go to other sources for the data, and they will stop using the unstrusted source. Too many times trust is purely subjective. This is one of the reasons why Excel starts to take root in organisations as a reporting tool. It is somewhere users can self source data, transform and aggregate it as they please and, maybe misguidedly, trust the results.

This starts to open up a much wider conversation about Data Governance that I will address in future posts. We have spoken to a lot of organisations recently where the issue is not that their users don’t have access to data, its that fact there are multiple systems that they could get the answer from and multiple routes around their information architecture that the data flows. You need a clear business intelligence and analytics architecture and roadmap.

Business intelligence and analytics systems are typically judged by return on investment (ROI), however I wonder if organisations with mature information architectures supported by complex data flows could be better off by looking at the cost and complexity of their data architecture. By looking at this they could address both data governance and the total cost of ownership (TCO).

The first step should be to analyse the analytics driven data flows, find out where they apply business logic, where there is duplication, and where there are silos. If you can simplify this process then you start to build the foundation for building a better ROI business case.

So addressing quality, relevance, and confidence in data is a big undertaking. There are some simple things you can do, such as maintain a taxonomy of reporting attributes across the organisation, however in most organisations with mature information architectures the answer is likely to be more deep rooted.


Our goal at Rittman Mead is to help companies harness data in and around their organisations through a range of analytics strategies, processes and tools. We see User Engagement as a key part of this. We believe in our User Engagement Service we have the right tools to help you raise your DAU/MAU.

We have a fundamental belief that the more people embed business intelligence and analytics into their work lives, the better job they will do their company.

The great thing is that in user engagement in OBIEE is measurable. Usage Tracking provides unequivocal details of how your system is performing, who is using it and how often, now and after any changes.

Categories: BI & Warehousing

Oracle Database Standard Edition 2 is available

Oracle Database Standard Edition 2 was announced earlier this year in a MOS note (2027072.1) and it is now available for download and purchase. Oracle Database Standard Edition 2 is an...

We share our skills to maximize your revenue!
Categories: DBA Blogs

JavaScript on the App Server: Scripting PeopleCode

Jim Marion - Wed, 2015-09-30 20:25

It has been nearly a decade since I started playing with JavaScript on the PeopleSoft application server. Back then I had to deploy a couple of JAR files to the app server. At that time, maintaining and deploying unmanaged files seemed more headache than benefit. Today Java provides full scripting support through the ScriptEngineManager and embedded Mozilla Rhino JavaScript script engine. Why would I want to script PeopleCode? Here are a few of my favorite reasons:

  • Low-level socket communication
  • Avoid reflection: JavaScript executes all methods regardless of variable type whereas PeopleCode only recognizes the returned type, not the real type
  • Process simple JSON structures that can't be modeled with the Documents module

Here is the PeopleCode required to invoke JavaScript

Local JavaObject &manager =  CreateJavaObject("javax.script.ScriptEngineManager");
Local JavaObject &engine = &manager.getEngineByName("JavaScript");

REM ** Evaluate a simple JavaScript;
&engine.eval("var result = Math.random();");

REM ** Access the value of the JavaScript variable named result;
Local string &result_text = &engine.get("result").toString();

Here is some JavaScript that converts the variable &json_string into a JSON Array and then iterates over each entry, inserting values into a table. Notice that I'm invoking the PeopleCode SQLExec function from JavaScript.

var result = (function() {
var SQLExec = Packages.PeopleSoft.PeopleCode.Func.SQLExec;
var json = JSON.parse(json_string);
var count = 0;
json.forEach(function(item, idx) {
SQLExec("INSERT INTO ... SYSTIMESTAMP", [idx, item]);
return count + " rows inserted";

Where did that &json_string variable come from? Here:

&engine.put("json_string", "[""item1"", ""item2"", ""item3""]");

OpenWorld 2015 Conference Schedule

Jim Marion - Wed, 2015-09-30 13:52

Just a couple more weeks and we will be enjoying the great weather and hospitality of San Francisco. I am anxiously anticipating another great OpenWorld conference. As always, I look forward to meeting with you between sessions or in the demo grounds. I will be presenting "PeopleSoft Developer: Tips and Techniques [CON8596]" on Monday, Oct 26 at 12:15 p.m. in Moscone West—3007.

I find the OpenWorld/JavaOne content catalog a little intimidating. If you are presenting a PeopleTools topic, please post your session details in the comments below to help the rest of us find PeopleTools-related sessions.

DOAG Conference Presentation Summary Finished

Dietmar Aust - Wed, 2015-09-30 13:48
Hi guys,

today was the deadline for uploading the four-page abstract / summary of my presentation at the German Oracle conference in Nürnberg:

If you still have to upload yours, hurry up ... only a few hours left ;).

You can have a look here (it is German though ;). 

See you in Nürnberg in November.


Oracle Mobile Cloud Service - External SOAP Service Connector

Andrejus Baranovski - Wed, 2015-09-30 13:14
These days everything is about MCS/MAF. I'm also looking into this new area, but I'm trying to mix traditional ADF topics and new things. Who knows may be MCS/MAF is a new big thing and its good time to learn it. I was testing how it works to define my own custom SOAP connector to calculate currency conversion rate.

MCS developer portal allows to create and use new connector. Special wizard helps to complete this task, just click on large CONNECTORS icon:

There is new option available to create new SOAP/REST connector:

Wizard reminds me JDEV interface, steps are similar as to generate SOAP connection in JDEV. You need to provide SOAP WSDL URL, name and description:

If create action is successful, General step is displayed with SOAP connector general details:

Port step provides information required when you would like to call SOAP service through the connector in custom code:

There is no security and in the last step I can test it. I'm checking for conversion rate from EUR to USD in the payload. Mobile backend should be specified to test connector SOAP call. I would understand Mobile backend something like Application Module in ADF BC, it is required to group business logic and expose interface:

SOAP service is invoked and I can see the response:

Connector is tested through mobile backend. Later in the diagnostics section we could see invocation statistics:

Next step would be to include connector call into custom API.

DAM tools, IBM Guardium, Oracle E-Business Suite, PeopleSoft and SAP

A question we have answered a few times in the last few months is whether or not, and if so, how easy do Database Activity Monitoring (DAM) tools such as IBM Guardium support ERP platforms such as the Oracle E-Business Suite, PeopleSoft and SAP. The answer is yes; DAM tools can support ERP systems. For example, IBM Guardium has out-of-the-box policies for both the E-Business Suite and SAP – see figures one and two below.

There are many advantages to deploying a DAM solution to protect your ERP platform, the first being additional defense-in-depth for one of your most critical assets. You can read more here ( Integrigy Guide to Auditing and Logging in Oracle E-Business Suite)  about Integrigy’s recommendations for database security programs. DAM solutions allow for complex reporting as well as 24x7 monitoring and easy relaying of alerts to your SIEM (e.g. Splunk or ArcSight).

Deploying DAM solutions to protect your SAP, PeopleSoft or E-Business Suite is a not-plug-and-play exercise. IBM Guardium’s out-of-the-box policies for the E-Business Suite require configuration to be of any value – see figure three below. The out-of-the-box DAM policies are a good starting point and Integrigy rarely sees them implemented as is. Integrigy also highly recommends, if at all possible, to complete a sensitive data discovery project prior to designing your initial DAM policies. Such projects greatly help to define requirements as well as offer opportunities for data clean up.

Overall, to design and implement an initial set of Guardium policies for the E-Business Suite (or any other ERP package) is usually a few weeks of effort depending on your size and complexity.

If you have any questions, please contact us at

Figure 1- Seeded Guardium Policies for EBS and SAP

Figure 2- Guardium E-Business Suite PCI Policy

Figure 3- Example of Blank Configuration




Tags: AuditingOracle E-Business SuiteIBM Guardium
Categories: APPS Blogs, Security Blogs

SQL On The Edge #3 – Azure Elastic Database Jobs

Pythian Group - Wed, 2015-09-30 10:15

Hello and welcome to episode number three of SQL On the Edge! In this episode we’re going to cover Azure SQL elastic database jobs. In the last few months, Microsoft has put a lot of effort in augmenting the elastic capabilities of the Azure SQL database service. We’re not only talking about the ability to scale UP but in this case about the capability to scale OUT.

The investments made on this front have produced:

– Elastic database tools for easier .NET development against multiple Azure SQL databases.
– Elastic database pools for better resource management.
– Elastic database jobs for easier job execution against groups of databases.
– Elastic database query for easier integrated querying of groups of databases.

Elastic database jobs are interesting because for a long time there wasn’t a native way to run jobs against Azure SQL databases. The solution we used with many of our clients was to have either a SQL Server on a VM to use the SQL Agent scheduling capabilities or using the Windows scheduler from a Windows Server VM or using the Azure job scheduler. These options, while serviceable were not really optimal for the task.

Elastic database jobs provide capabilities that cover the gaps we had before:

– You can run a job against an entire database pool, a pre-defined shard set or a custom database list.
– Job execution is logged and history can be retrieved per database.
– Information can be collected and stored from the results of each job execution.

For now, elastic database jobs are provided as a customer hosted web solution and an accompanying SQL database. At the moment, Powershell is also required to access the full functionality as the Portal only exposes a small part of it.

Let’s go over the feature and the demo in the video, enjoy!


Discover more about our expertise in SQL Server.

Categories: DBA Blogs


Jonathan Lewis - Wed, 2015-09-30 10:10

Here’s a live one from OTN – here are a couple of extracts from the problem statement:

We’re experiencing an issue where it seems that the query plan changes from day to day for a particular procedure that runs once a night.
It’s resulting in a performance variance of 10 second completion time vs 20 minutes (nothing in between).
It started occurring about 2 months ago and now it’s becoming more prevalent where the bad query plan is coming up more often.
I noticed that the query plans vary for a simple query.
We do run gather statistics every night. (DBMS_STATS.GATHER_SCHEMA_STATS (ownname=>sys_context( ‘userenv’, ‘current_schema’ ), estimate_percent => 1);)

The query and two execution plans look like this:

select count(*) from cs_bucket_member_v2 where bucket_type='P' and sec_id > 0 and order_id=0;

| Id  | Operation                    | Name                | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT             |                     |     1 |    12 |   155   (0)| 00:00:02 |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE              |                     |     1 |    12 |            |          |
|*  2 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| CS_BUCKET_MEMBER_V2 |  1148 | 13776 |   155   (0)| 00:00:02 |
|*  3 |    INDEX RANGE SCAN          | CS_BUCKET_MEMBER_N1 |  1272 |       |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
   2 - filter("BUCKET_TYPE"='P' AND "SEC_ID">0)
   3 - access("ORDER_ID"=0)

| Id  | Operation          | Name                | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT   |                     |     1 |    12 | 11215   (2)| 00:01:41 |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE    |                     |     1 |    12 |            |          |
|*  2 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL| CS_BUCKET_MEMBER_V2 |  1522K|    17M| 11215   (2)| 00:01:41 |

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
   2 - filter("ORDER_ID"=0 AND "SEC_ID">0 AND "BUCKET_TYPE"='P')

There are a couple of bits of information that would be useful – such as the database version, the number of rows in the table, the number of distinct values in each column, and whether any of the columns have histograms – but there are a couple of reasonable guesses that we might make about the problem. Notice particularly that the number of rows estimated from the index ranges scan is 1272 and only a small volume is then eliminated by the table filter predicates on sec_id and bucket_type. This suggests that the optimizer has information that tells it that most of the rows in the table have sec_id > 0 and bucket_type = ‘P’, and you might note that that suggests that there’s a histogram on bucket_type.

Rather than stating the most obvious guesses about the problem, though, I’ll start by creating a data set and emulating the problem, starting from an empty schema on

create table t1
with generator as (
        select  --+ materialize
                rownum id 
        from dual
        connect by 
                level <= 1e4
        rownum                  sec_id,
                when mod(rownum,1000) = 0
                        then 'X'
                        else 'P'
        end                     bucket_type,
                when rownum < 1e6 - 50000 
                        then mod(rownum-1,1e5)
                        else 1000
        end                     order_id,
        lpad(rownum,10,'0')     id_vc,
        rpad('x',100,'x')       padding
        generator       v1,
        generator       v2
        rownum <= 1e6

create index t1_i1 on t1(order_id) nologging; 

select count(*) from t1 where order_id = 1000 and bucket_type = 'P' and sec_id > 1000;

The column names in the table match those needed by the query, and the bucket_p column has a very skewed distribution that will eliminate very little data; the sec_id column is also not going to eliminate data, but it’s very evenly distributed with no large gaps so not a good candidate for a histogram in any case. The order_id has 50,000 rows out of 1,000,000 (5%) set of a single value, and most of those special rows are at the end of the table – it’s a pretty good candidate for a histogram (if Oracle spots it, and if we actually write queries to access that data).

I’ve run a query that references all three columns so that the default method_opt of “for all columns size auto” will apply to them when I gather stats. So here’s the code that gathers stats and checks the resulting execution plans, first for “auto_sample_size” then for the 1% used by the OP:

set autotrace traceonly explain

/*              estimate_percent => 1, */
                ownname          => user

select count(*) from t1 where order_id = 1000 and bucket_type = 'P' and sec_id > 1000;

                estimate_percent => 1,
                ownname          => user

select count(*) from t1 where order_id = 1000 and bucket_type = 'P' and sec_id > 1000;

set autotrace off

And here are the two plans – in the same order:

| Id  | Operation          | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT   |      |     1 |    12 |  2333   (4)| 00:00:12 |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE    |      |     1 |    12 |            |          |
|*  2 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL| T1   | 51063 |   598K|  2333   (4)| 00:00:12 |

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
   2 - filter("ORDER_ID"=1000 AND "SEC_ID">1000 AND "BUCKET_TYPE"='P')

| Id  | Operation                    | Name  | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT             |       |     1 |    12 |    23   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  SORT AGGREGATE              |       |     1 |    12 |            |          |
|*  2 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| T1    |    20 |   240 |    23   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  3 |    INDEX RANGE SCAN          | T1_I1 |    20 |       |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):  
   2 - filter("SEC_ID">1000 AND "BUCKET_TYPE"='P')
   3 - access("ORDER_ID"=1000)

[Update: Following on from a question in the comments, I’ve expanded this section, and wandered a little off-topic]

I don’t know why, but with a 1% sample (which really did sample 10,000 rows) the optimizer didn’t spot the need for a histogram on order_id, but with the auto_sample_size (which sampled 5,500 – yes, half as many rows) the optimizer spotted the need for the histogram. Checking the trace files the only difference visible in the sample SQL was the presence in the 1% sample of the id_vc and padding columns which were not present in the auto_sample_size trace.

According to the manuals when the method_opt is “for all columns size auto”, then

“Oracle determines the columns on which to collect histograms based on data distribution and the workload of the columns.”

There is nothing in the manuals to suggest that there is a deliberate link between the auto_sample_size and estimate_percent, and there is room for ambiguity in how we interpret this bit of text in the manual so the difference in the SQL used and the effects thereof requires (a) some hand-waving, and/or (b) lots more experimentation.  At the moment I’m prepared to go for hand-waving:

Hypothesis 1: auto_sample_size did not sample the id_vc and padding columns because the (100%) sample taken had given Oracle enough information to decide that the data distribution of those columns was not skewed enough to merit further consideration; but it sampled the three columns that had been used in a fashion that might be helped by a histogram. This sampling spotted the benefit of a histogram on order_id and bucket_type but decided that sec_id didn’t need a histogram

Hypothesis 2: the 1% sample got pretty close to the same results in its estimates of number of distinct values for id_vc and padding as the (100%) auto_sample_size, but still decided to do a sampled test for the data distribution (the manual seems to suggest that the histograms will only be considered if there has been some use of the columns in predicates, but doesn’t explicitly preclude the possibility of creating the histogram on the basis of just the data distribution). After doing the 1% sample to analyze the data for suitability of a histogram the result suggested that only the histogram on bucket_type would be beneficial.  (In fact, after the first sample Oracle took a second 1% histogram sample on just the order_id before deciding that it a histogram on order_id wasn’t needed.)

Bottom line on this: I don’t know if the auto_sample_size “accidentally” eliminated a couple of columns from histogram sampling and if a larger fixed sample size (say 50%, or even 100%) might result in Oracle eliminating a few columns from the histogram; or maybe the code path for histogram samples with auto_sample_size in place is actually a different code path. The only thing I can say is that the two sets of events that appeared from my demonstration don’t seem to be entirely self-consistent, but it would probably take most of a day doing experiments to narrow down the variation in behaviour to a few “best guess” ideas of what’s going on behind the scenes – though unwrapping the code might lead to a more accurate answer more quickly.


Histograms are tricky things – and you can only make things worse in 11g by NOT using the auto_sample_size.


Based on previous experience – my “obvious” guess about the OP’s data was that there was a special-case value for order_id, that the rows for that value were fairly well clustered, probably towards the end of the table, and constituted a small percentage of the table, and that the rest of the data reported “a few” rows per value. That’s why I built the model you see above.