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Is your mobile network HIPAA compliant?

Chris Foot - Wed, 2014-07-23 11:21

As hospital personnel continue to access patient records through mobile devices, health care organizations are taking new approaches to database security.

Assessing initial requirements
The best way for CIOs in the medical industry to measure the performance of their server protection strategies is to ensure all software deployments are compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Information Week contributor Jason Wang acknowledged the basic requirements HIPAA obligates mobile applications and networks to possess:

  • Authorized, defended user access to protected health information
  • Encryption features that hide sensitive data from unsanctioned personnel
  • Routine security updates to eliminate bugs or loopholes in the network
  • A remote access data elimination feature that can be activated by administrators in the event a mobile device is lost, stolen or compromised
  • A solid business continuity/disaster recovery framework that can be tested on a regular basis

With these points in mind, health care organizations would greatly benefit from having a third party develop an enterprise-wide mobile application for their facilities. Salesforce CRM in particular is a solid option for those looking to install such an implementation, primarily due to its reputation for having HIPAA-compliant security features.

The risks involved
Many medical professionals believe employing a mobile network will help their subordinates allot more attention to patients. While this concept may be true, there are a number of threats that left unacknowledged could infect such a system. Having a third-party company constantly conduct database active monitoring tasks is imperative to deterring the following dangers:

  • Mobile devices, as well as wearables, are easily misplaced, meaning that those who come across these mechanisms could access private patient information
  • As a number of health care providers are communicating with patients through social media – malware and other Web-based attacks could be funneled through such mediums to infect devices.
  • Because mobile keyboards are rudimentary, users are more likely to use uncomplicated passwords that can easily be unmasked.

Be a smart user
Database administration needs aside, health care companies must also provide personnel with a secure line of communication. HIT Consultant noted that text messaging is a solid way for hospital staff to transfer information quickly and on the go, but the avenue lacks the encryption technology necessary to keep these communications secure.

Installing an encoding program geared specifically toward mobile text messaging is a good move to make. However, employees should also be cognizant of the fact that they should not explicitly share vital information, if they can help it.

The post Is your mobile network HIPAA compliant? appeared first on Remote DBA Experts.

Combining RESTful, JQuery ,and KnockoutJS

Kris Rice - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:53
Here's a very easy example of how to join RESTful services with JQuery and some data binding from KnockoutJS.  This is a page that shows the last 100 requested features in the SQL Developer Exchange. SQL Developer Exchange Requests The REST service is very simple as it just strips out a <p> that the editor injects and a little format on the date. I did this all on jsbin.com so it's nice and

Using REST to search in JQuery

Kris Rice - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:41
Building on yesterday's post,  here's adding a search to the same JQuery list: SQL Developer Exchange Requests SQL Developer Exchange Requests The REST Template is only different by adding in a bind variable and adjusting the select some: The other thing I added into the JQuery list is the weight of the searched items.  Which can be seen in the blue bar here: The javascript changes are

Spark: A Discussion

Greg Pavlik - Wed, 2014-07-23 08:36
A great presentation, worth watching in its entirety.

With apologies to my Hadoop friends but this is good for you too.

The Customer Experience

Steve Karam - Wed, 2014-07-23 07:00
The Apple Experience[This entry is part 6 of 6 in the series Grow Your Career

I’m going to kick this post off by taking sides in a long-standing feud.

Apple is amazing.

There. Edgy, right? Okay, so maybe you don’t agree with me, but you have to admit that a whole lot of people do. Why is that?

NOT part of the Customer Experience. Image from AppleFanSite.com

Image from AppleFanSite.com

Sure, there’s the snarky few that believe Apple products are successful due to an army of hipsters with thousands in disposable income, growing thick beards and wearing skinny jeans with pipes in mouth and books by Jack Kerouac in hand, sipping lattes while furiously banging away on the chiclet keyboard of their Macbook Pro with the blunt corner of an iPad Air that sports a case made of iPhones. I have to admit, it does make for an amusing thought. And 15 minutes at a Starbucks in SoHo might make you feel like that’s absolutely the case. But it’s not.

If you browse message boards or other sites that compare PCs and Apple products, you’ll frequently see people wondering why someone would buy a $2,000 Macbook when you can have an amazing Windows 8.1 laptop with better specs for a little over half the price. Or why buy an iPad when you can buy a Samsung tablet running the latest Android which provides more freedom to tinker. Or why even mess with Apple products at all when they’re not compatible with Fragfest 5000 FPS of Duty, or whatever games those darn kids are playing these days.

Part of the Customer Experience. Image provided by cnet.com

Image from cnet.com

The answer is, of course, customer experience. Apple has it. When you watch a visually stunning Apple commercial, complete with crying grandpas Facetiming with their newborn great-grandson and classrooms of kids typing on Macbook Airs, you know what to expect. When you make the decision to buy said Macbook Air, you know that you will head to the Apple Store, usually in the posh mall in your town, and that it will be packed to the gills with people buzzing around looking at cases and Beats headphones and 27″ iMacs. You know that whatever you buy will come in a sleek white box, and will be placed into a thick, durable bag with two drawstring cords that you can wear like a backpack.

When you get it home and open the box, it’s like looking at a Tesla Model S. Your new laptop, situated inside a silky plastic bed and covered in durable plastic with little tabs to peel it off. The sleek black cardboard wrapped around a cable wound so perfectly that there’s not a single millimeter of space between the coils, nor a plug out of place. The laptop itself will be unibody, no gaps for fans or jiggly CD-ROM trays or harsh textures.

All of which is to say, Apple provides an amazing customer experience. Are their products expensive, sometimes ridiculously so? Of course. But people aren’t just buying into the product, they’re buying into the “Apple life.” And why not? I’d rather pay for experiences than products any day. I may be able to get another laptop with better specs than my Macbook Pro Retina, but there will always be something missing. Not the same Customer Experience.Maybe the screen resolution isn’t quite so good, maybe the battery doesn’t last as long, or maybe it’s something as simple as the power cord coming wrapped in wire bag ties with a brick the size of my head stuffed unceremoniously into a plastic bag. The experience just isn’t there, and I feel like I’ve bought something that’s not as magnificent as the money I put into it, features and specs be damned.

Customer experience isn’t just a buzz phrase, and it doesn’t just apply to how you deal with angry customers or how you talk to them while making a sale. It also doesn’t mean giving your customer everything they want. Customer experience is the journey from start to finish. It’s providing a predictable, customer-centric, and enjoyable experience for a customer that is entrusting their hard-earned cash in your product. And it applies to every business, not just retail computer sellers and coffee shops. What’s more, it applies to anyone in a service-oriented job.

Customer Experience for IT Professionals

In a previous post I mentioned how important it is to know your client. Even if your position is Sub-DBA In Charge of Dropping Indexes That Start With The Letter Z, you still have a customer (Sub-DBA In Charge Of Dropping Indexes That Start With The Letters N-Z, of course). Not just your boss, but the business that is counting on you to do your job in order to make a profit. And you may provide an exceptional level of service. Perhaps you spend countless hours whittling away at explain plans until a five page Cognos query is as pure as the driven snow and runs in the millisecond range. But it’s not just what you do, but how you do it that is important.

I want you to try something. And if you already do this, good on you. Next time you get a phone call request from someone at your work, or have a phone meeting, or someone sends you a chat asking you to do something, I want you to send a brief email back (we call this an “ack” in technical terms) that acknowledges their request, re-lists what they need in your own words (and preferably with bullets), and lists any additional requirements or caveats. Also let them know how long it will take. Make sure you don’t underestimate, it’s better to quote too much time and get it to them early. Once you’ve finished the work, write a recap email. “As we discussed,” you might say, “I have created the five hundred gazillion tables you need and renamed the table PBRDNY13 to PBRDNY13X.” Adding, of course, “Please let me know if you have any other requests.”

If the task you did involves a new connection, provide them the details (maybe even in the form of a TNSNAMES). If there are unanswered questions, spell them out. If you have an idea that could make the whole process easier next time, run it by them. Provide that level of experience on at least one task you accomplish for your customer if you do not already, and let me know if it had any impact that you can tell. Now do it consistently.

The Apple ExperienceFrom what I’ve seen, this is what separates the “workers” from the “rockstars.” It’s not the ability to fix problems faster than a speeding bullet (though that helps, as a service that sells itself), but the ability to properly communicate the process and give people a good expectation that they can count on.

There’s a lot more to it than that, I know. And some of you may say that you lack the time to have this level of care for every request that comes your way. Perhaps you’re right, or perhaps you’re suffering from IT Stockholm Syndrome. Either way, just give it a shot. I bet it will make a difference, at least most of the time.

Conclusion

Recently, I became the Director of Customer Education and Experience at Delphix, a job that I am deeply honored to have. Delphix is absolutely a product that arouses within customers an eager want, it solves complex business problems, has an amazing delivery infrastructure in the Professional Services team, and provides top notch support thereafter. A solid recipe for Customer Experience if there ever was one. But it’s not just about the taste of the meal, it’s about presentation as well. And so it is my goal to continuously build an industrialized, scalable, repeatable, and enjoyable experience for those who decide to invest their dollar on what I believe to be an amazing product. Simply put, I want to impart on them the same enthusiasm and confidence in our product that I have.

I hope you have the chance to do the same for your product, whatever it may be.

The post The Customer Experience appeared first on Oracle Alchemist.

Javascript Driven ADF Taskflows for WebCenter Portal

This is a continuation from my previous post - Developing WebCenter Content Cross Platform iDoc Enabled Components for Mobile, ADF, Sharepoint, Liferay.

You can see a video of JIVE Forums integration with a JS Taskflows vs ADF Taskflow running in WebCenter Portal here -

Click here for hi-resolution

This post is aimed at Web Developers, Designers and Marketing web teams who aren’t familiar with ADF and want to create reusable dynamic taskflows without the need to learn ADF or Java to provide interactive dynamic regions using Javascript, HTML and CSS with custom frameworks like jQuery designed not to conflict with ADF JS environment.

Read on for a step by step run through on creating JS driven taskflows  -

    1. You will need to download JDeveloper – I’m using JDev 11.1.1.7.0 for WebCenter Portal 11g where I will deploy my custom taskflow driven entirely with Javascript.
    2. Run through the following Oracle guide to setup your project to extend Portal (11.1.1.8.3) - Developing Components for WebCenter Portal Using JDeveloper
    3. Add new taskflow to library by right-clicking WebCenterSpacesExtensions and selecting “New…”
    4. Add ADF Task Flow (JSF)
      .
      1
      .
    5. Name the xml file, leaving the Directory the JDev default
      .
      2
      .
    6. Double click the new xml file and drag a View element into the diagram from the Component Palette
      .
      3
      .
    7. Rename “view1″ to “[taskflow name]View”.
    8. Double click the new view to create a page fragment.
      Update the directory and add \taskflows\[taskflow name]\view
      This will make it easier to sort through in the future when you develop more taskflows.
      .
      4
      .
    9. Edit the JSFF and display code in source view.
      .
      5
      .
    10. Replace with the following -
      <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
      <jsp:root xmlns:jsp="http://java.sun.com/JSP/Page" version="2.1"
                xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich"
                xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core">
      <af:resource type="javascript">
      <![CDATA[
      /**
       * CREATE BASE JS CONTAINER OBJ
       * This is base class to assist PSA javascript methods to init after page loaded.
       * You can add this script in the head of you template instead of the portlet.
       */
      var FB = window.FB || {},
      	Base = Base || (function() {
      		return {
      			//create multi-cast delegate.
      			onPortalInit: function(function1, function2) {
      				return function() {
      					if (function1) {
      						function1();
      					}
      					if (function2) {
      						function2();
      					}
      				}
      			},
      			//used for chaining methods
      			chainPSA: function() {}
      		}
      	})();
      
      //Use Base method if FB.Base hasn't been created
      FB.Base = FB.Base || Base;
      /************************/
      
      
      
      
      /**
       * CREATE CHAIN WRAPPER
       * Chain method will initialise from Base requirejs core script
       */
      FB.Base.chainPSA = FB.Base.onPortalInit(FB.Base.chainPSA, function() {
      	//set base mustache template name to load and inject
      	var vUID = 'FB_sampleContainer_${pageFlowScope.containerID}', //(UID) Unique Classname to inject template into - can't use IDs in portal 
      		oConstructor = {
      			vTemplate: 		'import/tpl/sampleTpl', //location of sampleTpl.mustache to load
      			oParams: { //Obj list of default params pulled from sample.xml Input definition
      				title:			'${pageFlowScope.title}',
      				displayTitle: 	'${pageFlowScope.displayTitle}',
      				activeUser: 	'${pageFlowScope.activeUser}'
      			},
      			containerID: 		vUID
      		};
      	
      	//check if array exists from other custom JS Portlets
      	if (typeof(FB.loadTemplate) === 'object') {
      		FB.loadTemplate.portletUIDList.push(vUID);
      	//create empty object
      	} else {
      		FB.loadTemplate = {
      			portletUIDList:[vUID],
      			portlets: {}
      		};
      	}
      
      	//inject params
      	FB.loadTemplate.portlets[vUID] = oConstructor;
      
      });
      /************************/
      ]]>
      </af:resource>
      
      
      <!-- Sample template will be injected here -->
      <af:panelGroupLayout layout="vertical" id="FB-SampleContainer" styleClass="FB_sampleContainer_#{pageFlowScope.containerID} portlet-sampleContainer"></af:panelGroupLayout>
      <!-- xSample template will be injected here -->
      
      
      </jsp:root>

      OVERVIEW:

      This is where the mustache template will be injected into to provide the sample component functionality.

    11. <af:panelGroupLayout layout="vertical" id="FB-SampleContainer" styleClass="FB_sampleContainer_#{pageFlowScope.containerID} portlet-sampleContainer"></af:panelGroupLayout>

      The oConstructor specifies the configuration of the the component to inject.
      vTemplate points to a JS file that requireJS imports and configures the base multiUploader components from the params defined.

      oParams contains all configuration for the App at the moment these are scoped params associated with the taskflow that you can allow the user to define and use within you sample component as a JS var.

      var vUID = 'FB_sampleContainer_${pageFlowScope.containerID}', //(UID) Unique Classname to inject template into - can't use IDs in portal 
      		oConstructor = {
      			vTemplate: 		'import/tpl/sampleTpl', //location of sampleTpl.mustache to load
      			oParams: { //Obj list of default params pulled from sample.xml Input definition
      				title:			'${pageFlowScope.title}',
      				displayTitle: 	'${pageFlowScope.displayTitle}',
      				activeUser: 	'${pageFlowScope.activeUser}'
      			},
      			containerID: 		vUID
      		};

      A simple check to see if other components exist on the page and append the new component within the JS Array “PortletUIDList” associated with a JS Object holding the component params in “portlets”

      //check if array exists from other custom JS Portlets
      	if (typeof(FB.loadTemplate) === 'object') {
      		FB.loadTemplate.portletUIDList.push(vUID);
      	//create empty object
      	} else {
      		FB.loadTemplate = {
      			portletUIDList:[vUID],
      			portlets: {}
      		};
      	}
      
      	//inject params
      	FB.loadTemplate.portlets[vUID] = oConstructor;

      Finally the JS configuration is wrapped in JS chain wrapper that will only initialise when requireJS has loaded in all its core base libraries like Jquery etc.

      FB.Base.chainPSA = FB.Base.onPortalInit(FB.Base.chainPSA, function() {
      
      //code
      
      });

      Make sure within your ADF Template you have setup requirejs core and have the following to initialise the FB.Base.chainPSA and loop through the custom taskflows to display on the page -

      //load JS Components
      		if (FB.Base.chainPSA) {
      			FB.Base.chainPSA();
      		}

      //loop and request all templates required
      			for (x;x<lPortletList;x++) {
      				var vPortletUID 	= aPortletList[x],
      					oPortlet 		= FB.loadTemplate.portlets[vPortletUID];
      				
      				//define temp object info to pass into script when init	
      				define('temp'+x, oPortlet);
      				
      				//request and initialise portlet template & pass params
      				require([oPortlet.vTemplate,'temp'+x], function(tpl,oPortlet) {
      					console.log('[IMPORTED TEMPLATE]',tpl.component,oPortlet);
      					tpl.init(oPortlet);
      				});
      			}

    12. To add taskflow parameters open the xml file again.
    13. Select Overview tab bottom left of the screen.
      Select the Parameters side tab.
      Add the following four example params -
      .
      6
      You will see these when we add and edit the taskflow to a portal page in WebCenter Composer.
    14. Deploy the taskflow to WebCenter Portal following the last steps in the Oracle GuideOnce the new taskflow / spaces extension project has been deployed load WebCenter Portal.
      The following screenshots from PS5 the UI has changed since PS7 but you should be able to work out the differences.
    1. Go into administration area of the portal and select the “Resources” Tab
    2. Select the “Resource Catalogs” from the items on the left under the “Structure” heading.
      A list of Resource Catalogs will be available. You can create a new one or use an existing one. Make sure the one you are updating is the one being used by the portal you want to add the taskflow into.
      .
      7
      .
    3. Select the resource catalogue and Edit from the Edit Menu drop down down.
      .
      8
      .
    4. A window will appear hear you can add folders and where you want your components to appear.
      I have created a Demo Taskflow folder.
    5. Select “Add From Library” from the Add dropdown menu.
      .
      9
      .
    6. Drill into Taskflows and add your [Taskflow] – I am adding the sample taskflow I created earlier.
    7. Go into your portal create a new page and add the new taskflow.
      Here is an example of the Jive Forums that I recreated as a JS driven taskflow.
      .
      11
      .
      12
      .
    8. And the final output of the taskflow on the page.
      13

 

 

 

The post Javascript Driven ADF Taskflows for WebCenter Portal appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Developing WebCenter Content Cross Platform iDoc Enabled Components for Mobile, ADF, Sharepoint, Liferay

frankensteinSo over the last couple of months I’ve been thinking and tinkering with code, wondering, “What’s the best approach for creating WebCenter Content (WCC) components that I can consume and reuse across multiple platforms and environments?”
Is it pagelet producer or maybe an iFrame? These solutions just weren’t good enough or didn’t allow the flexibility I really wanted.

I needed a WCC Solution that could easily be consumed into mobile, either Cordova (Hybrid APP) or ADF Mobile (AMX views), and that worked on different devices/platforms as well as on any enterprise app, i.e. Sharepoint (.Net), Lifreray,  WebCenter Portal (ADF) or even consumed into the new WebCenter Content ADF WebUI. It also needed to provide the added advantage that there would not need to be multiple branches of code or redevelopment of the component for each platform and environment.

And in the famous words of Victor Frankenstein.. “It’s Alive!!”

After tinkering around and trying different approaches, this is the solution I created to support the above model.
I’m not saying this is the right approach or supported by the enterprise vendors, but an approach that is reusable and can work on all enterprise apps.

 

[VIDEO CONVERTING]…

Here’s a quick video of a drag/drop MultiUploader component I created for WebCenter Content Classic that I can reuse on .Net and ADF WebCenter Portal/Content as well as mobile.

Read on to find out more on how this was achieved.

1) First, I’m going to dig into WebCenter Content and explain the underlying structure of the component.

To create a flexible base model, I created a light Javascript framework, very similar to AngularJS or ReactJS.

This would be the base component that would enable additional components on the page with the use of Mustache (JS templates) to drive and inject dynamic functional areas of content into a specified DOM node by ID or className.
Any changes of layout with the component are handled via an AJAX request to a cached mustache template which updates the DOM when needed (similar to ADFs PPR). Any user interaction is handled through event-driven actions from the imported templates.

RequireJS is used to supply a flexible module loading framework, where I do not need to be worried over conflicts of JS libraries and is used to load in mustache templates and additional JS functionality when needed.

You’re probably thinking that there are going to be a lot of AJAX requests going back and forth and it’s going to be slow. Just check out the video – the answer is not really. The mustache templates are going to be smaller than average images you load on a page.

So as an example for the MultiUploader, I only have 1 mustache template that is 9kb. All interaction is handled by 2 JS files that are 39kb uncompressed.

2) As mentioned, a base model WCC component, “FishbowlModuleLoader”, will load in and initiate all other components on the page and will only load and cache required templates and JS files as and when is needed. There is no point to load in all templates and JS functionality on a page if it is not needed, which improves performance and interaction of the component.

3) Following is a quick overview of how the WCC component “FishbowlMultiUploader” works.

WebCenter Content Resource Asset

This is the base structure of the Content Component configuration, “fb_multi_upload_page_body”. It is consumed into a custom template, “MULTI_UPLOAD_PAGE”, which is requested via a custom service request, “?IdcService=GET_FB_MULTI_UPLOAD_PAGE”.

<!--
Name:           fb_multi_upload_page_body
Author:         John Sim  [18/06/2014]
Parameters:		
Description:	Page Body for Multi Checkin used in MULTI_UPLOAD_PAGE template
-->
<@dynamichtml fb_multi_upload_page_body@>
[[% FB fb_multi_upload_page_body Template body MULTI_UPLOAD_PAGE %]]

<div id="FB-multiCheckin" class="FB_multiCheckin"></div>

<script>
/**
 * CREATE CHAIN WRAPPER
 * Chain method will load from Base ModuleLoader requirejs core script
 */
FB.Base.chainPSA = FB.Base.onPortalInit(FB.Base.chainPSA, function() {
	//set base mustache template name to load and inject
	var vUID = 'FB_multiCheckin', //(UID) Unique Classname to inject template into - can't use IDs in portal 
		oConstructor = {
			vTemplate: 'import/tpl/multiUploadTpl', //location of template.mustache to load
			oParams: { //Obj list of default params pulled from multiUploader.xml Input definition
				maxUploadSize:			'10mb',
				defaultDocType:			('<$multiUploadDefaultType$>' !== '')? '<$multiUploadDefaultType$>': 'Document', 
				defaultSecurityGroup:		('<$multiUploadDefaultSecurityGroup$>' !== '')? '<$multiUploadDefaultSecurityGroup$>': 'Public',
				defaultAccount:			'Workspace/'+userName, 
				author:				(typeof(userName) !== 'undefined')? userName: '', 
				httpEnterpriseCgiPath: 		(typeof(httpEnterpriseCgiPath) !== 'undefined')? httpEnterpriseCgiPath: '',
				idcToken: 			(typeof(idcToken) !== 'undefined')? idcToken: '',
				httpWebRoot: 			(typeof(httpWebRoot) !== 'undefined')? httpWebRoot: '',
				enableTagging:			true,
				enableEmails:			true,
				enableBarcode:			true,
				enableCheckinProfiles: 		true,
				showHelpOption: 		true
			},
			containerID: 		vUID
		};
	
	//check if array exists from other custom JS Portlets
	if (typeof(FB.loadTemplate) === 'object') {
		FB.loadTemplate.portletUID.push('FB_multiUploadContainer_' + vUID);
	//create empty object
	} else {
		FB.loadTemplate = {
			portletUIDList:['FB_multiUploadContainer_' + vUID],
			portlets: {}
		};
	}

	//inject params
	FB.loadTemplate.portlets['FB_multiUploadContainer_' + vUID] = oConstructor;
});
/************************/
</script>


<@end@>

This is where the mustache template will be injected into to provide the multiUpload component functionality.

<div id="FB-multiCheckin" class="FB_multiCheckin"></div>

The oConstructor specifies the configuration of the the component to inject.
vTemplate points to a JS file that requireJS imports and configures the base multiUploader components from the params defined.

oParams contains all configuration for the app; at the moment, these are mostly hard coded, but could be defined as iDoc Variables when you install and enable the component within WCC.

var vUID = 'FB_multiCheckin', //(UID) Unique Classname to inject template into - can't use IDs in portal 
		oConstructor = {
			vTemplate: 'import/tpl/multiUploadTpl', //location of template.mustache to load
			oParams: { //Obj list of default params pulled from multiUploader.xml Input definition
				maxUploadSize:			'10mb',
				defaultDocType:			('<$multiUploadDefaultType$>' !== '')? '<$multiUploadDefaultType$>': 'Document', 
				defaultSecurityGroup:		('<$multiUploadDefaultSecurityGroup$>' !== '')? '<$multiUploadDefaultSecurityGroup$>': 'Public',
				defaultAccount:			'Workspace/'+userName, 
				author:				(typeof(userName) !== 'undefined')? userName: '', 
				httpEnterpriseCgiPath: 		(typeof(httpEnterpriseCgiPath) !== 'undefined')? httpEnterpriseCgiPath: '',
				idcToken: 			(typeof(idcToken) !== 'undefined')? idcToken: '',
				httpWebRoot: 			(typeof(httpWebRoot) !== 'undefined')? httpWebRoot: '',
				enableTagging:			true,
				enableEmails:			true,
				enableBarcode:			true,
				enableCheckinProfiles: 		true,
				showHelpOption: 		true
			},
			containerID: 		vUID
		};

This is a simple check to see if other components exist on the page and append the new component within the JS Array “PortletUIDList” associated with a JS Object holding the component params in “portlets”.

//check if array exists from other custom JS Portlets
	if (typeof(FB.loadTemplate) === 'object') {
		FB.loadTemplate.portletUID.push('FB_multiUploadContainer_' + vUID);
	//create empty object
	} else {
		FB.loadTemplate = {
			portletUIDList:['FB_multiUploadContainer_' + vUID],
			portlets: {}
		};
	}

	//inject params
	FB.loadTemplate.portlets['FB_multiUploadContainer_' + vUID] = oConstructor;

Finally, the JS configuration is wrapped in JS chain wrapper that will only initialize when required. JS has loaded in all its core base libraries like Jquery, etc.

FB.Base.chainPSA = FB.Base.onPortalInit(FB.Base.chainPSA, function() {

//code

});

 

4) So lets take a look at how the base component “FishbowlModuleLoader” works.

Essentially, this defines the FB.Base.chainPSA chain wrapper method in the header – does not need jquery or any other library.

<!--
Name:           std_html_head_declarations
Author:         John Sim  [18/06/2014]
Parameters:		
Description:	Add required header resources
-->
<@dynamichtml std_html_head_declarations@>
[[% FB std_html_head_declaration Update head add JS libs for module loader %]]

<$include super.std_html_head_declarations$>

<script>
/**
 * CREATE BASE JS CONTAINER OBJ
 * DONOT ADD JQUERY this is base class to assist PSA javascript methods to init after page loaded.
 */
var FB = window.FB || {},
	Base = Base || (function() {
		return {
			//create multi-cast delegate.
			onPortalInit: function(function1, function2) {
				return function() {
					if (function1) {
						function1();
					}
					if (function2) {
						function2();
					}
				}
			},
			//used for chaining methods
			chainPSA: function() {}
		}
	})();

//Use Base method if FB.Base hasn't been created
FB.Base = FB.Base || Base;
/************************/
</script>

<@end@>

You could cache this and put it in a script file, I’ve just put it inline easier for you to read.

In the footer, we define requireJS and the configuration that loads in base libraries that we need for all components ie Jquery and maybe a few others.
Also we setup fb.core.js as our base script to import and load in the core framework I built to handle routing and DOM event interaction as well as global vars.

<!--
Name:           std_page_end
Author:         John Sim  [18/06/2014]
Parameters:		
Description:	Component Module Loader RequireJS setup
-->
<@dynamichtml std_page_end@>
[[% FB std_page_end Add Module Loader RequireJS lib %]]

<$include super.std_page_end$>


<!-- Init FB Component Module Loader -->
<script src="<$HttpWebRoot$>resources/FishbowlModuleLoader/js/core/config.js"></script>
<script src="<$HttpWebRoot$>resources/FishbowlModuleLoader/js/libs/requirejs/require.min.js" data-main="fb.core"></script>
<!-- Init FB Component Module Loader -->
<@end@>

fb.core.js so here is where the magic begins:

// REQUIREJS Base configuration
require([
	//Dom ready req plugin
	'domReady',
	
	
	//core 
	'import/Layout',
	'import/Action',
	'import/Navigation',
	'import/Global',
	
	
	//Plugins
	'Moment',		//date plugin momentjs
	'ftlabsFastClick', 	//fix touch 300ms delay
	'fb'			//fb global methods
	

	
], function(domReady, Layout){
console.info('[ALL MODULES LOADED]');

	domReady(function() {
		console.info('[DOM READY]');
		
		//initialise layout DOM events ie click, touch etc.
		Layout.init();
		
		//load JS Components
		if (FB.Base.chainPSA) {
			FB.Base.chainPSA();
		}
		
		//check if any JS driven template containers exist
		if (typeof(FB.loadTemplate) !== 'undefined') {
			var aPortletList 	= FB.loadTemplate.portletUIDList,
				lPortletList 	= aPortletList.length,
				x 				= 0;
				
			//loop and request all templates required
			for (x;x<lPortletList;x++) {
				var vPortletUID 	= aPortletList[x],
					oPortlet 		= FB.loadTemplate.portlets[vPortletUID];
				
				//define temp object info to pass into script when init	
				define('temp'+x, oPortlet);
				
				//request and initialise portlet template & pass params
				require([oPortlet.vTemplate,'temp'+x], function(tpl,oPortlet) {
					console.log('[IMPORTED TEMPLATE]',tpl.component,oPortlet);
					tpl.init(oPortlet);
				});
			}
		}
		
	});
	
});

Once the Dom has fully loaded, FB.Base.chainPSA(); is initiated. This sets up and configures the FB.loadTemplate object that contains all information associated to required components that will need to be loaded into the page.

Here we loop through and load in all templates, and pass across the component configuration to the templates to be initialized:

//loop and request all templates required
			for (x;x<lPortletList;x++) {
				var vPortletUID 	= aPortletList[x],
					oPortlet 		= FB.loadTemplate.portlets[vPortletUID];
				
				//define temp object info to pass into script when init	
				define('temp'+x, oPortlet);
				
				//request and initialise portlet template & pass params
				require([oPortlet.vTemplate,'temp'+x], function(tpl,oPortlet) {
					console.log('[IMPORTED TEMPLATE]',tpl.component,oPortlet);
					tpl.init(oPortlet);
				});
			}

And thats all there is to it.

5) Lets dig into WebCenter Portal now. How can you reuse all that code you’ve written for WebCenter Content Classic within ADF?

Easy: let’s create a JS driven taskflow template that we can dump into the resource catalogue and drag, drop, and reuse it throughout any page where ever it is needed.

I’ve created a new post for this part:
Read on here to find out how to create JS Driven Taskflow templates.

 

Some gotcha’s - 

Some things to think about if you do decide to use this approach.

  1. You will need to make sure that all AJAX requests are made on the same domain.
    1. or enable CORs from UCM to accepts requests cross domain. (Mobile works crossdomain)
  2. WCC needs to be accessible by the users browser
    1. You can setup a proxy service and only allow access to the custom services you require to lock down other UCM environment access if needed.

And finally - one thing that comes to mind here: I am using static mustache templates but there is nothing stopping you from creating a custom WCC service to generate mustache templates with embedded idoc if you want..

The post Developing WebCenter Content Cross Platform iDoc Enabled Components for Mobile, ADF, Sharepoint, Liferay appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Teradata bought Hadapt and Revelytix

Curt Monash - Wed, 2014-07-23 02:29

My client Teradata bought my (former) clients Revelytix and Hadapt.* Obviously, I’m in confidentiality up to my eyeballs. That said — Teradata truly doesn’t know what it’s going to do with those acquisitions yet. Indeed, the acquisitions are too new for Teradata to have fully reviewed the code and so on, let alone made strategic decisions informed by that review. So while this is just a guess, I conjecture Teradata won’t say anything concrete until at least September, although I do expect some kind of stated direction in time for its October user conference.

*I love my business, but it does have one distressing aspect, namely the combination of subscription pricing and customer churn. When your customers transform really quickly, or even go out of existence, so sometimes does their reliance on you.

I’ve written extensively about Hadapt, but to review:

  • The HadoopDB project was started by Dan Abadi and two grad students.
  • HadoopDB tied a bunch of PostgreSQL instances together with Hadoop MapReduce. Lab benchmarks suggested it was more performant than the coyly named DBx (where x=2), but not necessarily competitively with top analytic RDBMS.
  • Hadapt was formed to commercialize HadoopDB.
  • After some fits and starts, Hadapt was a Cambridge-based company. Former Vertica CEO Chris Lynch invested even before he was a VC, and became an active chairman. Not coincidentally, Hadapt had a bunch of Vertica folks.
  • Hadapt decided to stick with row-based PostgreSQL, Dan Abadi’s previous columnar enthusiasm notwithstanding. Not coincidentally, Hadapt’s performance never blew anyone away.
  • Especially after the announcement of Cloudera Impala, Hadapt’s SQL-on-Hadoop positioning didn’t work out. Indeed, Hadapt laid off most or all of its sales and marketing folks. Hadapt pivoted to emphasize its schema-on-need story.
  • Chris Lynch, who generally seems to think that IT vendors are created to be sold, shopped Hadapt aggressively.

As for what Teradata should do with Hadapt:

  • My initial thought Hadapt was to just double down, pushing the technology forward, presumably including a columnar option such as the one Citus Data developed.
  • But upon reflection, if it made technical sense to merge the Aster and Hadapt products, that would be better yet.

I herewith apologize to Aster co-founder and Hadapt skeptic Tasso Argyros (who by the way has moved on from Teradata) for even suggesting such heresy. :)

Complicating the story further:

  • Impala lets you treat data in HDFS (Hadoop Distributed File System) as if it were in a SQL DBMS. So does Teradata SQL-H. But Hadapt makes you decide whether the data is in HDFS or the SQL DBMS, and it can’t be in both at once. Edit: Actually, see Dan Abadi’s comments below.
  • Impala and Oracle’s new SQL-H competitor have daemons running on every data node. So does one option in Hadapt. But I don’t think SQL-H does that yet.

I was less involved with Revelytix that with Hadapt (although I’m told I served as the “catalyst” for the original Teradata/Revelytix partnership). That said, Teradata — like Oracle — is always building out a data integration suite to cover a limited universe of data stores. And Revelytix’ dataset management technology is a nice piece toward an integrated data catalog.

Related posts

Teradata bought Hadapt and Revelytix

DBMS2 - Wed, 2014-07-23 02:29

My client Teradata bought my (former) clients Revelytix and Hadapt.* Obviously, I’m in confidentiality up to my eyeballs. That said — Teradata truly doesn’t know what it’s going to do with those acquisitions yet. Indeed, the acquisitions are too new for Teradata to have fully reviewed the code and so on, let alone made strategic decisions informed by that review. So while this is just a guess, I conjecture Teradata won’t say anything concrete until at least September, although I do expect some kind of stated direction in time for its October user conference.

*I love my business, but it does have one distressing aspect, namely the combination of subscription pricing and customer churn. When your customers transform really quickly, or even go out of existence, so sometimes does their reliance on you.

I’ve written extensively about Hadapt, but to review:

  • The HadoopDB project was started by Dan Abadi and two grad students.
  • HadoopDB tied a bunch of PostgreSQL instances together with Hadoop MapReduce. Lab benchmarks suggested it was more performant than the coyly named DBx (where x=2), but not necessarily competitively with top analytic RDBMS.
  • Hadapt was formed to commercialize HadoopDB.
  • After some fits and starts, Hadapt was a Cambridge-based company. Former Vertica CEO Chris Lynch invested even before he was a VC, and became an active chairman. Not coincidentally, Hadapt had a bunch of Vertica folks.
  • Hadapt decided to stick with row-based PostgreSQL, Dan Abadi’s previous columnar enthusiasm notwithstanding. Not coincidentally, Hadapt’s performance never blew anyone away.
  • Especially after the announcement of Cloudera Impala, Hadapt’s SQL-on-Hadoop positioning didn’t work out. Indeed, Hadapt laid off most or all of its sales and marketing folks. Hadapt pivoted to emphasize its schema-on-need story.
  • Chris Lynch, who generally seems to think that IT vendors are created to be sold, shopped Hadapt aggressively.

As for what Teradata should do with Hadapt:

  • My initial thought Hadapt was to just double down, pushing the technology forward, presumably including a columnar option such as the one Citus Data developed.
  • But upon reflection, if it made technical sense to merge the Aster and Hadapt products, that would be better yet.

I herewith apologize to Aster co-founder and Hadapt skeptic Tasso Argyros (who by the way has moved on from Teradata) for even suggesting such heresy. :)

Complicating the story further:

  • Impala lets you treat data in HDFS (Hadoop Distributed File System) as if it were in a SQL DBMS. So does Teradata SQL-H. But Hadapt makes you decide whether the data is in HDFS or the SQL DBMS, and it can’t be in both at once. Edit: Actually, see Dan Abadi’s comments below.
  • Impala and Oracle’s new SQL-H competitor have daemons running on every data node. So does one option in Hadapt. But I don’t think SQL-H does that yet.

I was less involved with Revelytix that with Hadapt (although I’m told I served as the “catalyst” for the original Teradata/Revelytix partnership). That said, Teradata — like Oracle — is always building out a data integration suite to cover a limited universe of data stores. And Revelytix’ dataset management technology is a nice piece toward an integrated data catalog.

Related posts

Categories: Other

EID Holidays and things to do

Syed Jaffar - Wed, 2014-07-23 02:07
Looking forward to a much anticipated 9 day EID holiday break to complete the to-do-list which I have been carrying for a while now. Determined to complete some of the writing assignments that I have kept pending for a long period of time now. At the same time, will have to seek the possibilities to exploring the new features of v12.1.0.2 and Exadata as we might we going for the combination in the coming weeks for a Data Warehouse project.

Will surely blog about my test scenarios and will share the inputs on Oracle 12c new features.

I wish everyone a very happy and prosperous EID in advance.

12c Threaded Execution Test

Bobby Durrett's DBA Blog - Tue, 2014-07-22 17:39

I did a quick check of some facts I’m studying about Oracle 12c and its new threaded execution mode.  I set this parameter:

alter system set THREADED_EXECUTION=true scope=spfile;

I had to connect SYS as SYSDBA with a password to get the system to bounce.

Then it had these processes only:

oracle    1854     1  0 09:17 ?        00:00:00 ora_pmon_orcl
oracle    1856     1  0 09:17 ?        00:00:00 ora_psp0_orcl
oracle    1858     1  2 09:17 ?        00:00:00 ora_vktm_orcl
oracle    1862     1  3 09:17 ?        00:00:00 ora_u004_orcl
oracle    1868     1 99 09:17 ?        00:00:17 ora_u005_orcl
oracle    1874     1  0 09:17 ?        00:00:00 ora_dbw0_orcl

This differs from some of my 12c OCP study material but agrees with the manuals.  Only pmon, psp, vktm, and dbw have dedicated processes.

Also, I found that I needed this value in the listener.ora:

dedicated_through_broker_listener=on

I needed that value to connect using a thread.  Before I put that in it spawned a dedicated server process when I connected over the network.

Lastly, contrary to what I had read I didn’t need to set the local_listener parameter to get the new connections to use a thread:

SQL> show parameter local_listener

NAME                                 TYPE        VALUE
------------------------------------ ----------- ---------------------
local_listener                       string

- Bobby

Categories: DBA Blogs

REGEXP_LIKE: strange unspecified value in parameter “modifier”

XTended Oracle SQL - Tue, 2014-07-22 15:05

Today I noticed strange thing in predicate section of execution plan for simple query with regexp_like, where 3rd parameter “MODIFIER” was not specified:

SQL> select * from dual where regexp_like(dummy,'.');

D
-
X

SQL> select * from table(dbms_xplan.display_cursor);

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
SQL_ID  97xuqf9cmjsta, child number 0
-------------------------------------
select * from dual where regexp_like(dummy,'.')

Plan hash value: 272002086

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation         | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT  |      |       |       |     2 (100)|          |
|*  1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL| DUAL |     1 |     2 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   1 - filter( REGEXP_LIKE ("DUMMY",'.',HEXTORAW('F07FD85CFF0700006A1116
              45010000000000000000000000FC12164501000000000000000000000000000000000000
              0010000000000000001880D85CFF07000002000000000000000000000081000000') ))


20 rows selected.

It is particularly interesting that the values in HEXTORAW() are always different for different first parameters:

SQL> select * from dual where regexp_like(dummy,'x');
...
   1 - filter( REGEXP_LIKE ("DUMMY",'x',HEXTORAW('3895D330FF0700006A1116
              45010000000000000000000000FC12164501000000000000000000000000000000000000
              0011000000000000006895D330FF07000002000000000000000000000081000000') ))
SQL> select * from dual where regexp_like(dummy,'y');
...
   1 - filter( REGEXP_LIKE ("DUMMY",'y',HEXTORAW('00DA3C3FFF0700006A1116
              45010000000000000000000000FC12164501000000000000000000000000000000000000
              00110000000000000030DA3C3FFF07000002000000000000000000000081000000') ))
SQL> select * from dual where regexp_like(dummy||'','x')
...
   1 - filter( REGEXP_LIKE ("DUMMY"||'','x',HEXTORAW('70964F2FFF0700006A
              111645010000000000000000000000FC1216450100000000000000000000000000000000
              0000001100000000000000A0964F2FFF07000002000000000000000000000081000000')
               ))

I don’t know, what does it mean, but it looks like garbage from memory.
When I noticed this, I decided to check how regexp_like will work in function-based indexes:

SQL> create table xtest as
  2    select dummy||level as str
  3    from dual
  4    connect by level<=30;

Table created.

SQL> select * from xtest where case when regexp_like(str,'1') then 1 end = 1;
...
12 rows selected.

SQL> select * from table(dbms_xplan.display_cursor);

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SQL_ID  7ztp0k8c1zn2h, child number 0
-------------------------------------
select * from xtest where case when regexp_like(str,'1') then 1 end = 1

Plan hash value: 4207139086

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation         | Name  | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT  |       |       |       |     3 (100)|          |
|*  1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL| XTEST |    12 |   264 |     3   (0)| 00:00:01 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   1 - filter(CASE  WHEN  REGEXP_LIKE
              ("STR",'1',HEXTORAW('68F9CB32FF0700006A111645010000000000000000000000FC1
              216450100000000000000000000000000000000000000110000000000000098F9CB32FF0
              7000002000000000000000000000081000000') ) THEN 1 END =1)

SQL> create index xtest_fbi on xtest(case when regexp_like(str,'1') then 1 end);

Index created.

SQL> select * from xtest where case when regexp_like(str,'1') then 1 end = 1;
...
12 rows selected.

SQL> select * from table(dbms_xplan.display_cursor);

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SQL_ID  7ztp0k8c1zn2h, child number 0
-------------------------------------
select * from xtest where case when regexp_like(str,'1') then 1 end = 1

Plan hash value: 1479471124

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                   | Name      | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT            |           |       |       |     2 (100)|          |
|   1 |  TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| XTEST     |    12 |   300 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  2 |   INDEX RANGE SCAN          | XTEST_FBI |    12 |       |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   2 - access("XTEST"."SYS_NC00002$"=1)

SQL> select column_expression from user_ind_expressions e where e.index_name='XTEST_FBI';

COLUMN_EXPRESSION
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CASE  WHEN  REGEXP_LIKE ("STR",'1') THEN 1 END

As you can see it works fine, although the predicate from first execution plan differs from the FBI expression.
Then I dumped 10053 trace and noticed that the HEXTORAW(…) function appeared in “Explain Plan Dump” only, so it looks just like plan output bug.

Categories: Development

Integrating PFCLScan and Creating SQL Reports

Pete Finnigan - Tue, 2014-07-22 14:20

We were asked by a customer whether PFCLScan can generate SQL reports instead of the normal HTML, PDF, MS Word reports so that they could potentially scan all of the databases in their estate and then insert either high level....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 25/06/14 At 09:41 AM

Categories: Security Blogs

Automatically Add License Protection and Obfuscation to PL/SQL

Pete Finnigan - Tue, 2014-07-22 14:20

Yesterday we released the new version 2.0 of our product PFCLObfuscate . This is a tool that allows you to automatically protect the intellectual property in your PL/SQL code (your design secrets) using obfuscation and now in version 2.0 we....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 17/04/14 At 03:56 PM

Categories: Security Blogs

Twitter Oracle Security Open Chat Thursday 6th March

Pete Finnigan - Tue, 2014-07-22 14:20

I will be co-chairing/hosting a twitter chat on Thursday 6th March at 7pm UK time with Confio. The details are here . The chat is done over twitter so it is a little like the Oracle security round table sessions....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 05/03/14 At 10:17 AM

Categories: Security Blogs

PFCLScan Reseller Program

Pete Finnigan - Tue, 2014-07-22 14:20

We are going to start a reseller program for PFCLScan and we have started the plannng and recruitment process for this program. I have just posted a short blog on the PFCLScan website titled " PFCLScan Reseller Program ". If....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 29/10/13 At 01:05 PM

Categories: Security Blogs

PFCLScan Version 1.3 Released

Pete Finnigan - Tue, 2014-07-22 14:20

We released version 1.3 of PFCLScan our enterprise database security scanner for Oracle a week ago. I have just posted a blog entry on the PFCLScan product site blog that describes some of the highlights of the over 220 new....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 18/10/13 At 02:36 PM

Categories: Security Blogs

PFCLScan Updated and Powerful features

Pete Finnigan - Tue, 2014-07-22 14:20

We have just updated PFCLScan our companies database security scanner for Oracle databases to version 1.2 and added some new features and some new contents and more. We are working to release another service update also in the next couple....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 04/09/13 At 02:45 PM

Categories: Security Blogs

Oracle Security Training, 12c, PFCLScan, Magazines, UKOUG, Oracle Security Books and Much More

Pete Finnigan - Tue, 2014-07-22 14:20

It has been a few weeks since my last blog post but don't worry I am still interested to blog about Oracle 12c database security and indeed have nearly 700 pages of notes in MS Word related to 12c security....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 28/08/13 At 05:04 PM

Categories: Security Blogs

Oracle 12c Security - SQL Translation and Last Logins

Pete Finnigan - Tue, 2014-07-22 14:20

There has been some big new security items added to 12cR1 such as SHA2 in DBMS_CRYPTO, code based security in PL/SQL, Data Redaction, unified audit or even privilege analysis but also as I hinted in some previous blogs there are....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 31/07/13 At 11:11 AM

Categories: Security Blogs