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Migrating Oracle Utilities products from On Premise to Oracle Public Cloud

Anthony Shorten - Thu, 2016-04-28 17:48

A while back Oracle Utilities announced that the latest releases of the Oracle Utilities Application Framework applications were supported on Platform As A Service (PaaS) on Oracle Public Cloud. As part of that support a new whitepaper has been released outlining the process of migrating an on-premise installation of the product to the relevant Platform As A Service offering on Oracle Public Cloud.

The whitepaper covers the following from a technical point of view:

  • The Oracle Cloud services to obtain to house the products, including the Oracle Java Cloud Service and Oracle Database As A Service with associated related services.
  • Setup instructions on how to configure the services in preparation to house the product.
  • Instructions of how to prepare the software for transfer.
  • Instructions on how to transfer the product schema to a Oracle Database As A Service instance using various techniques.
  • Instructions on how to transfer the software and make configuration changes to realign the product installation for the cloud. The configuration must follow the instructions in the Native Installation Oracle Utilities Application Framework (Doc Id: 1544969.1) available from My Oracle Support which has also been updated to reflect the new process.
  • Basic instructions on using the native cloud facilities to manage your new PaaS instances. More information is available in the cloud documentation.

The whitepaper applies to the latest releases of the Oracle Utilities Application Framework based products only. Customers and partners wanting to establish new environments (with no previous installation) can use the same process with the addition of actually running the installation on the cloud instance.

Customers and partners considering using Oracle Infrastructure As A Service can use the same process with the addition of installing the prerequisites.

The Migrating From On Premise To Oracle Platform As A Service (Doc Id: 2132081.1) whitepaper is available from My Oracle Support. This will be the first in a series of cloud based whitepapers.

Oracle Fusion Middleware : Concepts & Architecture : If I can do it, you can too

Online Apps DBA - Thu, 2016-04-28 15:43

If I can do it, you can too…and I truly believe this.      In this post I am going to cover what is Oracle Fusion Middleware (FMW), Why I learnt it and What & How you should learn it too.     Before I tell more about FMW, for those who don’t know me, 16 Years ago, […]

The post Oracle Fusion Middleware : Concepts & Architecture : If I can do it, you can too appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

A Practitioner’s Assessment: Digital Transformation

Pythian Group - Thu, 2016-04-28 12:49

 

Rohinee Mohindroo is a guest blogger on Pythian Business Insights.

 

trans·for·ma·tion/ noun: a thorough or dramatic change in form or appearance

The digital transformation rage continues into 2016 with GE, AT&T, GM, Domino’s, Flex, and Starbucks, to name a few. So what’s the big deal?

Technical advances continue to progress at a rapid rate. Digital transformation simply refers to the rate at which the technological trends are embraced by an individual, organization or team.

Organizational culture and vocabulary are leading indicators of the digital transformation maturity level.

blogimagerohinee

Level 1: Business vs. Tech (us vs. them). Each party is fairly ignorant of the value and challenges of the other. Each blames the other for failures and takes credit for successes. Technology is viewed as a competency with a mandate to enable the business.

Level 2: Business and Tech (us and them). Each party is aware of the capability and challenges of the other. Credit for success is shared, failure is not discussed publicly or transparently. Almost everyone  is perceived to be technically literate with a desire to deliver business differentiation.

Level 3: Business is Tech (us). Notable awareness of the business model and technology capabilities and opportunities throughout the organization. Success is expected and failure is an opportunity. The organization is relentlessly focused on learning from customers and partners with a shared goal to continually re-define the business.

Which level best describes you or your organization? Please share what inhibits your organization from moving to the next level.

 

Categories: DBA Blogs

Slides and demo script from my APEX command line scripting talk at APEX Connect 2016 in Berlin

Dietmar Aust - Thu, 2016-04-28 11:30
Hi everybody,

I just came back from the DOAG APEX Connect 2016 conference in Berlin ... very nice location, great content and the wonderful APEX community to hang out with ... always a pleasure. This time we felt a little pinkish ;)

As promised, you can download the slides and the demo script (as is) from my site. They are in German, but I will give the talk in June at KScope 2016 in Chicago in English just as well.

Instructions are included.

See you at KScope in Chicago, #letswreckthistogether .

Cheers and enyoy!
~Dietmar. 

Slides and demo script from my ORDS talk at APEX Connect 2016 in Berlin

Dietmar Aust - Thu, 2016-04-28 11:25
Hi everybody,

I just came back from the DOAG APEX Connect 2016 conference in Berlin ... very nice location, great content and the wonderful APEX community to hang out with ... always a pleasure. This time we felt a little bit pink ;)

As promised, you can download the slides and the demo script (as is) from my site.

Instructions are included.

See you at KScope in Chicago, #letswreckthistogether .

Cheers and enyoy!
~Dietmar. 

Log Buffer #471: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Pythian Group - Thu, 2016-04-28 09:14

This Log Buffer Edition covers Oracle, SQL Server and MySQL blog posts of the week.

Oracle:

Improving PL/SQL performance in APEX

A utility to extract and present PeopleSoft Configuration and Performance Data

No, Oracle security vulnerabilities didn’t just get a whole lot worse this quarter.  Instead, Oracle updated the scoring metric used in the Critical Patch Updates (CPU) from CVSS v2 to CVSS v3.0 for the April 2016 CPU.  The Common Vulnerability Score System (CVSS) is a generally accepted method for scoring and rating security vulnerabilities.  CVSS is used by Oracle, Microsoft, Cisco, and other major software vendors.

Oracle Cloud – DBaaS instance down for no apparent reason

Using guaranteed restore points to navigate through time

SQL Server:

ANSI SQL with Analytic Functions on Snowflake DB

Exporting Azure Data Factory (ADF) into TFS Source Control

Getting started with Azure SQL Data Warehouse

Performance Surprises and Assumptions : DATEADD()

With the new security policy feature in SQL Server 2016 you can restrict write operations at the row level by defining a block predicate.

MySQL:

How to rename MySQL DB name by moving tables

MySQL 5.7 Introduces a JSON Data Type

Ubuntu 16.04 first stable distro with MySQL 5.7

MariaDB AWS Key Management Service (KMS) Encryption Plugin

MySQL Document Store versus Bug hunter

Categories: DBA Blogs

No Filters: My ASU/GSV Conference Panel on Personalized Learning

Michael Feldstein - Thu, 2016-04-28 07:57

By Michael FeldsteinMore Posts (1069)

ASU’s Lou Pugliese was kind enough to invite me to participate on a panel discussion on “Next-Generation Digital Platforms,” which was really about a soup of adaptive learning, CBE, and other stuff that the industry likes to lump under the heading “personalized learning” these days. One of the reasons the panel was interesting was that we had some smart people on the stage who were often talking past each other a little bit because the industry wants to talk about the things that it can do something about—features and algorithms and product design—rather than the really hard and important parts that it has little influence over—teaching practices and culture and other messy human stuff. I did see a number of signs at the conference (and on the panel) that ed tech businesses and investors are slowly getting smarter about understanding their respective roles and opportunities. But this particular topic threw the panel right into the briar patch. It’s hard to understand a problem space when you’re focusing on the wrong problems. I mean no disrespect to the panelists or to Lou; this is just a tough nut to crack.

I admit, I have few filters under the best of circumstances and none left at all by the second afternoon of an ASU/GSV conference. I was probably a little disruptive, but I prefer to think of it as disruptive innovation.

Here’s the video of the panel:

The post No Filters: My ASU/GSV Conference Panel on Personalized Learning appeared first on e-Literate.

Standard SQL ? – Oracle REGEXP_LIKE

The Anti-Kyte - Thu, 2016-04-28 05:55

Is there any such thing as ANSI Standard SQL ?
Lots of databases claim to conform to this standard. Recent experience tends to make me wonder whether it’s more a just basis for negotiation.
This view is partly the result of having to juggle SQL between three different SQL parsers in the Cloudera Hadoop infrastructure, each with their own “quirks”.
It’s worth remembering however, that SQL differs across established Relational Databases as well, as a recent question from Simon (Teradata virtuoso and Luton Town Season Ticket Holder) demonstrates :

Is there an Oracle equivalent of the Teradata LIKE ANY operator when you want to match against a list of patterns, for example :

like any ('%a%', '%b%')

In other words, can you do a string comparison, including wildcards, within a single predicate in Oracle SQL ?

The short answer is yes, but the syntax is a bit different….

The test table

We’ve already established that we’re not comparing apples with apples, but I’m on a bit of a health kick at the moment, so…

create table fruits as
    select 'apple' as fruit from dual
    union all
    select 'banana' from dual
    union all
    select 'orange' from dual
    union all
    select 'lemon' from dual
/
The multiple predicate approach

Traditionally the search statement would look something like :

select fruit
from fruits
where fruit like '%a%'
or fruit like '%b%'
/

FRUIT 
------
apple 
banana
orange

REGEXP_LIKE

Using REGEXP_LIKE takes a bit less typing and – unusually for a regular expression – less non-alphanumeric characters …

select fruit
from fruits
where regexp_like(fruit, '(a)|(b)')
/

FRUIT 
------
apple 
banana
orange

We can also search for multiple substrings in the same way :

select fruit
from fruits
where regexp_like(fruit, '(an)|(on)')
/

FRUIT 
------
banana
orange
lemon 

I know, it doesn’t feel like a proper regular expression unless we’re using the top row of the keyboard.

Alright then, if we just want to get records that start with ‘a’ or ‘b’ :

select fruit
from fruits
where regexp_like(fruit, '(^a)|(^b)')
/

FRUIT 
------
apple 
banana

If instead, we want to match the end of the string…

select fruit
from fruits
where regexp_like(fruit, '(ge$)|(on$)')
/

FRUIT
------
orange
lemon

…and if you want to combine searching for patterns at the start, end or anywhere in a string, in this case searching for records that

  • start with ‘o’
  • or contain the string ‘ana’
  • or end with the string ‘on’

select fruit
from fruits
where regexp_like(fruit, '(^o)|(ana)|(on$)')
/

FRUIT
------
banana
orange
lemon

Finally on this whistle-stop tour of REGEXP_LIKE, for a case insensitive search…

select fruit
from fruits
where regexp_like(fruit, '(^O)|(ANA)|(ON$)', 'i')
/

FRUIT
------
banana
orange
lemon

There’s quite a bit more to regular expressions in Oracle SQL.
For a start, here’s an example of using REGEXP_LIKE to validate a UK Post Code.
There’s also a comprehensive guide here on the PSOUG site.
Now I’ve gone through all that fruit I feel healthy enough for a quick jog… to the nearest pub.
I wonder if that piece of lime they put in top of a bottle of beer counts as one of my five a day ?


Filed under: Oracle, SQL Tagged: regexp_like

Contemplating Upgrading to OBIEE 12c?

Rittman Mead Consulting - Thu, 2016-04-28 04:00
Where You Are Now

NewImage
OBIEE 12c has been out for some time, and it seems like most folks are delaying upgrading to OBIEE 12c until the very last minute. Or at least until Oracle decides to put out another major version change of OBIEE, which is understandable. You’ve already spent time and money and devoted hundreds of resource hours to system monitoring, maintenance, testing, and development. Maybe you’ve invested in staff training to try to maximize your ROI in your existing OBIEE purchase. And now, after all this time and effort, you and your team have finally gotten things just right. Your BI engine is humming along, user adoption and stickiness are up, and you don’t have a lot of dead objects clogging up the Web Catalog. Your report hacks and work-arounds have been worked and reworked to become sustainable and maintainable business solutions. Everyone is getting what they want.

Sure, this scenario is part fantasy, but it doesn’t mean that as a BI team lead or member, you’re not always working toward this end. It would be nice to think that the people designing the tools with which we do this work understood the daily challenges and processes we must undergo in order to maintain the precarious homeostasis of our BI ecosystems. That’s where Rittman Mead comes in. If you’re considering upgrading to OBIEE 12c, or are even curious, keep reading. We’re here to help.

So Why Upgrade

Let’s get right down to it. Shoot over here and here to check out what our very own Mark Rittman had to say about the good, the bad, and the ugly of 12c. Our Silvia Rauton did a piece on lots of the nuts and bolts of 12c’s new front-end features. They’re all worth a read. Upgrading to OBIEE 12c offers many exciting new features that shouldn’t be ignored.

Heat Map

How Rittman Mead Can Help

We understand what it is to be presented with so many project challenges. Do you really want to risk the potential perils and pitfalls presented by upgrading to OBIEE 12c? We work both harder and smarter to make this stuff look good. And we get the most out of strategy and delivery via a number of in-house tools designed to keep your OBIEE deployment in tip top shape.

Maybe you want to make sure all your Catalog and RPD content gets ported over without issue? Instead of spending hours on testing every dashboard, report, and other catalog content post-migration, we’ve got the Automated Regression Testing package in our tool belt. We deploy this series of proprietary scripts and dashboards to ensure that everything will work just the way it was, if not better, from one version to the next.

Maybe you’d like to make sure your system will fire on all cylinders or you’d like to proactively monitor your OBIEE implementation. For that we’ve got the Performance Analytics Dashboards, built on the open source ELK stack to give you live, active monitoring of critical BI system stats and the underlying database and OS.

OBIEE Performance Analytics

On top of these tools, we’ve got the strategies and processes in place to not only guarantee the success of your upgrade, but to ensure that you and your team remain active and involved in the process.

What to Expect

You might be wondering what kinds of issues you can expect to experience during upgrading to OBIEE 12c (which is to say, nothing’s going to break, right?). Are you going to have to go through a big training curve? Does upgrading to OBIEE 12c mean you’re going to experience considerable resource downtime as your team, or an even an outside company, manages this process? To answer this question, I’m reminded of a quote from the movie Fight Club: “Choose your level of involvement.”

While we always prefer to work alongside your BI or IT team to facilitate the upgrade process, we also know that resource time is valuable and that your crew can’t stop what they’re doing until things wraps up. We often find that the more clients are engaged with the process, however, the easier the hand-off is because clients better understand best practices, and IT and BI teams are more empowered for the future.

Learning More about OBIEE 12c

But if you’re like many organizations, maybe you have to stay more hands off and get training after the upgrade is complete. Check out the link here to look over the agenda of our OBIEE 12c Bootcamp training course. Like our hugely popular 11g course, this program is five days of back-to-front instruction taught via a selection of seminars and hands-on labs, designed to impart most everything your team will need to know to continue or begin their successful BI practice.

What we often find is that, in addition to being a thorough and informative course, the Bootcamp is a great way to bring together teams or team members, often dispersed among different offices, under one roof to gain common understanding about how each person plays an important role as a member of the BI process. Whether they handle the ETL, data modeling, or report development, everyone can benefit from what often evolves from a training session into some impromptu team building.

Feel Empowered

If you’re still on the fence about whether or not to upgrade, as I said before, you’re not alone. There are lots of things you need to consider, and rightfully so. You might be thinking, “What does this mean for extra work on the plates of my resources? How can I ensure the success of my project? Is it worth it to do it now, or should I wait for the next release?” Whatever you may be mulling over, we’ve been there, know how to answer the questions, and have some neat tools in our utility belt to move the process along. In the end, I hope to have presented you with some bits to aid you in making a decision about upgrading to OBIEE 12c, or at least the impetus to start thinking about it.

If you’d like any more information or just want to talk more about the ins and outs of what an upgrade might entail, send over an email or give us a call.

The post Contemplating Upgrading to OBIEE 12c? appeared first on Rittman Mead Consulting.

Categories: BI & Warehousing

Any Questions

Jonathan Lewis - Thu, 2016-04-28 02:56

I’m going to be at the OUG Scotland conference on 22nd June, and one of my sessions is a panel session on Optimisation where I’ll be joined by Joze Senegacnik and Card Dudley.

The panel is NOT restricted to questions about how the cost based optimizer works (or not), we’re prepared to tackle any questions about making Oracle work faster (or more efficiently – which is not always the same thing). This might be configuration, indexing, other infrastructure etc.; and if we haven’t got a clue we can always ask the audience.

To set the ball rolling on the day it would be nice to have a few questions in advance, preferably from the audience but any real-world problems will be welcome and (probably) relevant to the audience. If you have a question that you think suitable please email it to me or add it as a comment below. Ideally a question will be fairly short and be relevant to many people; if you have to spend a long time setting the scene and supplying lots of specific detail then it’s probably a question that an audience (and the panel) would not be able to follow closely enough to give relevant help.

Update 29th April

I’ve already had a couple of questions in the comments and a couple by email – but keep them coming.

 

 

 


Server Problems : Update

Tim Hall - Thu, 2016-04-28 01:08

hard-disk-42935_640This is a follow on from my server problems post from yesterday…

Regarding the general issue, misiaq came up with a great suggestion, which was to use watchdog. It’s not going to “fix” anything, but if I get a reboot when the general issue happens, that would be much better than having the server sit idle for 5 hours until I  wake up.

Archive Storage Services vs Archive Cloud Services

Pat Shuff - Thu, 2016-04-28 01:07
Yesterday we started talking about the cost comparison for storage in the cloud. We briefly touched on the cost of long term archive in the cloud. How much does it cost to backup data for long term archive and what is the best way to do this? Years ago the default way of doing this was to copy your data on disk to a tape unit and put the tape in a box. The box was then put in an environmentally controlled room to extend the lifetime of tape and a person was put on staff to pull the data off the shelf when the data was needed. The data might be a backup of data on disk or a secondary copy just in case the disk failed. Tape was typically used to provide separation of duties required by Sarbanes-Oxly to keep people who report on financial data separate from the financial data. It also allowed companies to take large volumes of data, like seismic data, and not keep it on spinning disks. The traces were reloaded when geophysicists wanted to look at the data.

The first innovation in this technology was to provide a robot to load and unload tapes as a tape unit gets full or needs to be reloaded. Magazines were created that could hold eight tapes and the robots had bar code readers so that they could seek to the right tape in the magazine, pull it out of the series of tapes and inserted into the tape unit for reading or writing. Management software got more advanced and understood the bar code values and could sequence the whopping 800 GB of data that could be written to an LT04 tape. Again, technology gets updated and the industry moved to LT05 and LT06 tapes with significantly higher densities. A single LT06 could hold 2.5 TB per tape unit. Technology marches on and compression allows us to store 6 TB on these disks. If we go back to our 120 TB case that we talked about yesterday this means that we will need 20 tapes (at $30-$45 for each tape) and $25K for a single tape drive unit. Most tape drive systems support 8 tapes per magazine so we are talking about something that will support three magazines. To support three magazines, we need a second shelf in our tape storage so the price goes up by about $20K. We are sitting at about $55K to backup our 120 TB and $5.5K in support annually for the hardware. We also need about $1K in tape for the number of full and incremental backups that we want which would be $20K for four months of retention before we recycle the tapes. These tapes are good for a dozen re-writes so every three years we will need to repurchase tapes. If we spread the cost of the tape unit, tape drives, and tapes across three years we are looking at $2K/month to backup our 120 TB. We also need to factor in $60/week for tape pickup and storage fees at a service like Iron Mountain and a couple of $250 charges to retrieve tapes in the event of a catastrophic failure to drive tapes back to our data center from cold storage. This bumps the cost to $2.2K/month which is significantly cheaper than the $10K/month for network storage in our data center or $3.6K/month for cloud storage services. Unfortunately, a tape unit requires someone to care and feed it and you will pay that person more than $600/month but not $7.8K/month which you would with the cloud or disk solutions.

If you had a ton of data to archive you could purchase a tape silo that supported hundreds or thousands of magazines. Unfortunately, this expandability cones at a cost. The tape backup unit grew from an eighth of a rack to twenty full racks. There isn't much in between. You can get an eighth of a rack solution, a full rack solution, or a twenty full rack solution. The larger solution comes in at hundreds of thousands of dollars rather than tens of thousands.

Enter cloud solutions. Amazon and Oracle offer tape solutions in the cloud. Both companies offer the twenty full rack solution but only charge a per tape charge to consumers. Amazon Glacier charges $7/TB/month to store data. Oracle charges $1/TB/month for the same service. Both companies charge for data restoration and outbound transfer of data. The Amazon Glacier cost of writing 120 TB and reading back 10% of it comes in at $2218/month. This is the same cost as having the tape unit on site. The key difference is that we can recover the data by requesting it from Amazon and get it back in less than four hours. There is no emergency recovery charges. There is not the weekly pickup charges. We can expand the amount that we backup and the bulk of this cost is reading back the data ($1300). Storage is relatively cheap for our backups, we just need to plan on the cost of recovery and try to limit this since it is the bulk of the cost.

We can drop this cost even more using the Oracle Archive Cloud Services. The price from Oracle is $1/TB/month but the recovery and transmission charges are about the same. The same archive service with Oracle is $1560/month with roughly $1300 being the charges for restoring and outbound transfer of the data. Unfortunately, Oracle does not offer an un-metered archive service so we have to guestimate how much we are going to restore on a monthly basis.

Both services use REST apis to write, restore, and read data. When a container (Oracle Archive) or bucket (Amazon Glacier) is created, a PUT call is done to the endpoint of the service. The first step required by both are authentication to provide credentials into the service. Below we show the Oracle authentication and creation process through the REST api.

The important part of this is the archive header extension. This differentiates if the container is spinning disk or if it is tape in the cloud.

Amazon recommends using a windows based tool like s3browser, CloudBerry, or using a language like Java, .NET, or Ruby and their published SDKs. CloudBerry works for the Oracle Archive as well. When you create a container you have the option of pulling down storage or archive as the container type.

Both services allow you to encrypt and compress the data as it is written with HTML Headers changing the characteristics and parameters of the container. Both services require you to issue a PUT request to write the data to tape. Below we show the Oracle REST api.

For CloudBerry and the other gui based tools, uploading is just a drag and drop from your local file system to the tape storage in the cloud.

Amazon details the readback procedure and job system that shows the status of the restore request. Oracle has a similarly defined retrieval policy as well as an archive tutorial. Both services offer a 4 hour window to allow for restoration. Below is an example of a restore request and checking on the job status of the job spawned to load the tape and transfer the data for reading. The file is ready to read when the completedPercentage is 100.

We can do the same thing with the S3 browser and Amazon Glacier. We need to request the restore, check the job status, then download the restored files. The files change color when they are ready to read.

In summary, we have looked at how to reduce cost of archives and backups. We looked at using a secondary disk at our data center or another data center. We looked at using on site tape units. We looked at disk in the cloud. Today we looked at tape in the cloud. It is important to remember that not one of these solutions is the answer. A combination of any or all of them are needed. Daily and weekly backups should happen to a secondary disk locally. This data is most likely to be restored on a regular basis. Once you get a full backup or two under your belt, move the data to another site. It might be spinning disk, it might be tape but something needs to be offsite in the event of a true catastrophic failure like a communication link going out (think Dell PowerVault and a thunderstorm) and you loose your primary lun and secondary lun that contains your backups. The whole idea of offsite backups are not for restore but primary for insurance and regulation compliance. If someone needs to see the old data, it is there. You are betting that you won't need to read it back and the cloud vendors are counting on that. If you do read it back on a regular basis you might want to significantly increase your budget, pass the charges onto the people who want to read data back, or look for another solution. Tape storage in the cloud is a great way of archiving data for a long time at a low cost.

Fall 2014 IPEDS Data: Top 30 largest online enrollments per institution

Michael Feldstein - Wed, 2016-04-27 17:21

By Phil HillMore Posts (402)

The National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) and its Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) provide the most official data on colleges and universities in the United States. This is the third year of data.

Let’s look at the top 30 online programs for Fall 2014 (in terms of total number of students taking at least one online course). Some notes on the data source:

  • I have combined the categories ‘students exclusively taking distance education courses’ and ‘students taking some but not all distance education courses’ to obtain the ‘at least one online course’ category;
  • Each sector is listed by column;
  • IPEDS tracks data based on the accredited body, which can differ for systems – I manually combined most for-profit systems into one institution entity as well as Arizona State University[1];
  • See this post for Fall 2013 Top 30 data and see this post for Fall 2014 profile by sector and state.
Fall 2014 Top 30 Largest Online Enrollments Per Institution Number Of Students Taking At Least One Online Course (Graduate & Undergraduate Combined)

Top 30 Online Enrollments By Fall 2014 IPEDS Data

The post Fall 2014 IPEDS Data: Top 30 largest online enrollments per institution appeared first on e-Literate.

Fall 2014 IPEDS Data: New Profile of US Higher Ed Online Education

Michael Feldstein - Wed, 2016-04-27 16:12

By Phil HillMore Posts (402)

The National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) and its Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) provide the most official data on colleges and universities in the United States. I have been analyzing and sharing the data in the initial Fall 2012 dataset and for the Fall 2013 dataset. Both WCET and the Babson Survey Research Group also provide analysis of the IPEDS data for distance education. I highly recommend the following analysis in addition to the profile below (we have all worked together behind the scenes to share data and analyses).

Below is a profile of online education in the US for degree-granting colleges and university, broken out by sector and for each state.

Please note the following:

  • For the most part distance education and online education terms are interchangeable, but they are not equivalent as DE can include courses delivered by a medium other than the Internet (e.g. correspondence course).
  • I have provided some flat images as well as an interactive graphic at the bottom of the post. The interactive graphic has much better image resolution than the flat images.
  • There are three tabs below in the interactive graphic – the first shows totals for the US by sector and by level (grad, undergrad); the second also shows the data for each state; the third shows a map view.
  • Yes, I know I’m late this year in getting to the data.

By Sector

If you select the middle tab, you can view the same data for any selected state. As an example, here is data for Virginia in table form.

By State Table VA

There is also a map view of state data colored by number of, and percentage of, students taking at least one online class for each sector. If you hover over any state you can get the basic data. As an example, here is a view highlighting Virginia private 4-year institutions.

By State Map VA

Interactive Graphic

For those of you who have made it this far, here is the interactive graphic. Enjoy the data.

The post Fall 2014 IPEDS Data: New Profile of US Higher Ed Online Education appeared first on e-Literate.

Oracle Security And Delphix Paper and Video Available

Pete Finnigan - Wed, 2016-04-27 14:50

I did a webinar with Delphix on 30th March 2016 on USA time. This was a very good session with some great questions at the end from the attendees. I did a talk on Oracle Security in general, securing non-production....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 01/04/16 At 03:43 PM

Categories: Security Blogs

3 Days of Oracle Security Training In York, UK

Pete Finnigan - Wed, 2016-04-27 14:50

I have just updated the public Oracle Security training dates on our Oracle Security training page to remove the public trainings that have already taken place this year and to add a new training in York for 2016. After the....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 31/03/16 At 01:53 PM

Categories: Security Blogs

Oracle Data Masking and Secure Test Databases

Pete Finnigan - Wed, 2016-04-27 14:50

My daily work is helping my customers secure their Oracle databases. I do this in many ways from performing detailed security audits of key databases to helping in design of secure lock down policies to creating audit trails to teaching....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 14/03/16 At 08:45 AM

Categories: Security Blogs

BOF: A Sample Application For Testing Oracle Security

Pete Finnigan - Wed, 2016-04-27 14:50

In my Oracle security training classes I use a couple of sample applications for various demonstrations. I teach people how to perform security audits of Oracle databases, secure coding in PL/SQL, designing audit trail solutions and locking down Oracle. We....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 10/03/16 At 11:07 AM

Categories: Security Blogs

Two New Oracle Security Presentations Available

Pete Finnigan - Wed, 2016-04-27 14:50

I attended the UKOUG conference last week Monday to Wednesday in Birmingham. This is the first year for three years that it has been back at the ICC in the center of Birmingham. The last two years have seen the....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 14/12/15 At 08:54 PM

Categories: Security Blogs

Oracle Security Training In York

Pete Finnigan - Wed, 2016-04-27 14:50

We ran a five day Oracle Security training event in York, England from September 21st to September 25th at the Holiday Inn hotel. This proved to be very successful and good fun. The event included back to back teaching by....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 22/10/15 At 08:49 PM

Categories: Security Blogs