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Updated: 2 hours 11 min ago

From Concept to Code

Thu, 2014-11-20 17:42

Editor’s note: Here’s a repost of a wonderful write-up of an event we did a couple weeks ago, courtesy of Friend of the ‘Lab Karen Scipi (@KarenScipi).

What Karen doesn’t mention is that she organized, managed and ran the event herself. Additional props to Ultan (@ultan) on the idea side, including the naming, Sandra Lee (@SandraLee0415) on the execution side and to Misha (@mishavaughan) for seeing the value. Without the hard work of all these people, I’m still just talking about a great idea in my head that I’m too lazy to execute. You guys all rock. 

Enjoy the read.

Concept to Code: Shaping and Shipping Innovative User Experience Solutions for the Enterprise

By Karen Scipi

It was an exciting event here at Oracle Headquarters as our User Experience AppsLab (@theappslab) Director Jake Kuramoto (@jkuramot) recently hosted an internal design jam called Shape and ShipIt. Fifteen top-notch members of the newly expanded team got together for two days with a packed schedule to research and innovate cutting-edge enterprise solutions, write use cases, create wireframes, and build and code solutions. They didn’t let us down.

The goal: Collaborate and rapidly design practical, contextual, mobile Oracle Applications Cloud solutions that address real-world user needs and deliver enterprise solutions that are streamlined, natural, and intuitive user experiences.

The result: Success! Four new stellar user experience solutions were delivered to take forward to product development teams working on future Oracle Application Cloud simplified user interface releases.

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Shape and ShipIt event banner

While I cannot share the concepts or solutions with you as they are under strict lock and key, I can share our markers of the event’s success with you.

The event was split into two days:

Day 1: A “shape” day during which participants received invaluable guidance from Bill Kraus on the role of context and user experience, then researched and shaped their ideas through use cases and wireframes.

Day 2: A “ship” day during which participants coded, reviewed, tested, and presented their solutions to a panel of judges that included Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), Vice President of the Oracle Applications User Experience team.

It was a packed two days full of ideas, teamwork, and impressive presentations.

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Participants Anthony Lai, Bill Kraus, and Luis Galeana [photo: Sandra Lee (@SandraLee0415)]

The participants formed four small teams that comprised managers, architects, researchers, developers, and interaction designers whose specific perspectives proved to be invaluable to the tasks at hand. Their blend of complementary skills enabled the much needed collaboration and innovation.

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Diversity drives more innovation at Oracle. Participants Mark Vilrokx, Osvaldo Villagrana, Raymond Xie Julia Blyumen, and Joyce Ohgi hard at work. [photo: Karen Scipi (@KarenScipi)]

Although participants were charged with a short timeframe for such an assignment, they were quick to adapt and refine their concepts and produce solutions that could be delivered and presented in two days. Individual team agility was imperative for designing and delivering solutions within a two-day timeframe.

Participants were encouraged to brainstorm and design in ways that suited them. Whether it was sitting at tables with crayons, paper, notebooks and laptops, or hosting walking meetings outside, the participants were able to discuss concepts and ideate in their own, flexible ways.

 Sandra Lee]

Brainstorming with notebooks and pens: Cindy Fong and Tony Orciuoli [photo: Sandra Lee]

 Karen Scipi]

Brainstorming with laptops: Noel Portugal and Ben Bendig
[photo: Karen Scipi]

As with all of our simplified user interface design efforts, participants kept a “context produces magic” perspective front and center throughout their activities. In the end, team results yielded responsive, streamlined, context-driven user experience solutions that were simple yet powerful.

Healthy “brain food” and activity breaks were encouraged, and both kept participants engaged and focused on the important tasks at hand. Salads, veggies, dips, pastas, wraps, and sometimes a chocolate chip cookie (for the much needed sugar high) were on the menu. The activity break of choice was an occasional competitive game of table tennis at the Oracle Fitness Center, just a stone’s throw from the event location. The balance of think-mode and break-mode worked out just right for participants.

 Karen Scipi]

Healthful sustenance: Lunch salads [photo: Karen Scipi]

Our biggest marker of success, though, was how wrong we were. Yes. Wrong. While we expected one team’s enterprise solution to clearly stand out from among all of the others, we were pleasantly surprised as all four were equally impressive, viable, and well-received by the design jam judges. Four submissions, four winners. Nice job!

 Karen Scipi]

Participants (standing) Cindy Fong, Sarahi Mireles, and Tony Orciuoli present their enterprise solution to the panel of judges (seated): Jake Kuramoto, Jatin Thaker, Tim Dubois, Jeremy Ashley, and Bill Kraus [photo: Karen Scipi]

Stay tuned to the Usable Apps Blog to learn more about such events and what happens to the innovative user experiences that emerge!Possibly Related Posts:

Musings on Samsung Developer Conference 2014

Mon, 2014-11-17 11:18

This year some of us at the AppsLab attended the Samsung Developer Conference aka #SDC2014. Last year it was Samsung’s first attempt and we were also there. The quality and caliber of presentations increased tenfold from last year. Frankly, Samsung is doing it really hard to resist to join their ecosystem.

sdc2014

Here are some of the trends I observed:

Wearables and Health:

There was a huge emphasis in Samsung’s commitment with wearable technology. They released a new Tizen based smartwatch (Samsung Gear S) as well as a biometric reference design hardware and software called SIMBAND. Along with their wearable strategy they also released S.A.M.I, a cloud repository to store all this data. All this ties together with their vision of “Voice of the Body.”

Voice of the Body from Samsung on Vimeo.

During the second day keynote we got to hear from Mounir Zok Senior Sports Technologist of the United States Olympic Committee. He told us of how wearable technology is changing they way Olympic athletes are training. It was only a couple years ago when athletes still had to go to a lab and “fake” actual activities to get feedback. Now they can actually get real data on the field thanks to wearable technology.

Virtual Reality:

Samsung released the Gear VR in partnership with Oculus. This goggles can only work with a mounted Galaxy Note 4 in the front. The gaming experiences with this VR devices are amazing. But they are also exploring other cases like virtual tourism and virtual movie experiences. They released a 3D 360+spherical view camera called “Project Beyond.”

IoT – Home Automation:

Samsung is betting big with IoT and Home Automation and they are putting their money where their mouth is by acquiring SmartThings. The SmartThings platform is open sourced and has the ability to integrate with a myriad of other  home automation products. They showcased a smart home powered by SmartThings platform.

Mobile Innovation: 

I actually really like their new Galaxy Note Edge phablet. Samsung is showing true innovation here with the “edge” part of the device. It has it’s own SDK and it feels great on the hand!

Overall I’m pretty impressed with what Samsung is doing. It seems like their spaghetti-on-the-wall approach (throwing a bunch spaghetti and see what sticks) is starting to pay off.  Their whole UX across devices looks seamless. And in my humble approach they are getting ready to take off on their own without having to use Android for their mobile devices. Tizen keeps maturing, but I shall leave that for another post!

Please feel free to share your experience with Samsung devices as well!Possibly Related Posts:

Asteroid Hackathon – The Winning Team

Mon, 2014-11-17 09:57

Editorial Note: This is a guest post by friend of the ‘Lab and colleague DJ Ursal. Also be sure to check out our Hackathon entry here:

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EchoUser (@EchoUser), in partnership with SpaceGAMBIT, Maui Makers, the Minor Planet Center, NASA, the SETI Institute, and Further by Design, hosted an Asteroid Hackathon. The event was in response to the NASA Grand Challenge, “focused on finding all asteroid threats to human populations and knowing what to do about them.”

I had a wonderful opportunity to participate in the Asteriod Hackathon last week. MY team name was NOVA. Our team comprised for 4 team members – DJ Ursal, Kris Robison, Daniel Schwartz, Raj Krishnamurthy

We were given live data from NASA and Minor Planet site and literally just had 5 hours to put together a working prototype and solution to the Asteroid big data problem.  We created a web application (works not only on your MAC or PC but also on your iPad and your latest Nexus 7 Android devices) which would help scientists, astronomers and anyone who is interested in Asteriods discover, learn and share information in a fun and interactive way.

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Our main them was Finding Asteroids Before They Find Us. The goal was to help discover, learn and share Asteroids information to increase awareness within the community.  We created an interactive web app that allowed users to make use of chart filters to find out about the risk for possibilities of future impact with Earth. Find out about the distance of the asteroids to Earth, absolute brightness and rotation of the Asteroid. It allowed users to click and drag on any chart to filter, so that they could transform the filters in multidimensional  way in order to explorer, discover , interesting facts and share data on asteroids with riends and community. We made use of Major Tom who  is an astronaut referenced in David Bowie’s songs “Space Oddity. “Space Oddity” depicts an astronaut who casually slips the bonds of the world to journey beyond the stars. Users could post questions to Major Tom and could also play his song.

The single most important element about WINNING this hackathon  strategically was  team composition. Having a team that is effective working together. Collaboration and communication skills were the two of most critical personal skills demanded of all members as time was limited and communication and coordination of utmost importance.

Winning TEAM NOVA- DJ Ursal, Kris Robison, Daniel Schwartz, Raj Krishnamurthy Possibly Related Posts:

Asteroid Hackathon

Mon, 2014-11-17 09:49

A couple weeks ago Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), Bill Kraus, Raymond Xie and I participated in the Asteroid Hackathon hosted by @EchoUser. The main focus was “to engage astronomers, other space nerds, and the general public, with information, not just data.”

asteroid-hackathon-small

As you might already know, we here at the AppsLab, are big fans of Hackathons as well as ShipIt days or FedEx days. The ability to get together, get our collective minds together and being able to create something in a short amount of time is truly amazing. It also helps to keep us on our toes, technically and creatively.

Our team built what we called “The Daily Asteroid.” The idea behind our project was to highlight the asteroid profile of the current date’s closed approach to Earth or near Earth object (NEO) data. What this means is to show which asteroid is the closest to earth today. A user could “favorite” today’s asteroid and start a conversation with other users about it, using a social network like Twitter.

Screen Shot 2014-11-17 at 9.47.36 AM

We also added the ability to change the asteroid properties (size, type, velocity, angle) and play a scenario to see what damage could it cause if it hit the earth. And to finish up,  we created an Asteroid Hotline using Twilio (@twilio) where you can call to get the latest NEO info using your phone!

We were lucky to be awarded 3rd place or “Best Engagement,” and we had a blast doing it. Considering the small amount time we had, we came out really proud of our results.Possibly Related Posts:

The Cloud UX Lab

Mon, 2014-11-10 09:57

There’s a post over on VoX about a OAUX new lab at Oracle HQ, the Cloud UX Lab.

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Jeremy Ashley, VP, in the new lab, image used with permission.

Finished just before OOW in September, this lab is a showcase for OAUX projects, including a few of ours.

The lab reminds me of a spacecraft from the distant future, the medical bay or the flight deck. It’s a very cool place, directly inspired and executed by our fearless leader, Jeremy Ashley (@jrwashley), an industrial designer by trade.

I actually got to observe the metamorphosis of this space from something that felt like a doctor’s office waiting room into the new hotness. Looking back on those first meetings, I never expected it would turn out so very awesome.

Anyway, the reason why I got to tag along on this project is because our team will be filling the control room for this lab with our demos. Noel (@noelportugal) and Jeremy have a shared vision for that space, which will be a great companion piece to the lab and equally awesome.

So, if you’re at Oracle HQ, book a tour and stop by the new Cloud UX Lab, experience the new hotness and speculate on what Noel is cooking up behind the glass.Possibly Related Posts:

Pseudo-Philosophical Observations on Wearables, Part 1

Wed, 2014-11-05 11:53

Jawbone announced the Up3 today, reportedly its most advanced fitness tracker to date.

As with all fitness trackers, the Up3 has an accelerometer, but it also has sensors for measuring skin and ambient temperature, as well as something called bioimpedence. As these data collected by the Up3 are used by a new feature called Smart Coach.

You can imagine what the Smart Coach does. It sounds like a cool, possibly creepy, feature.

This post is not about the Up3.

This post is about my journey into the dark heart of the quantified self. The Up3 has just reminded me to coalesce my thoughts.

Earlier this year, I started wearing my first fitness tracker, the Misfit Shine. I happily wore it for about two months before the battery died, and then I realized it had control of me.

Misfit calculates activity based on points, and my personal goal of 1,000 points was relatively easy to reach every day, even for someone who works from home. What I realized quickly was that the Shine pushed me to chase points, not activity.

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My high score.

 

The Shine uses its accelerometer to measure activity, so depending on where I wore it on my person, a run could be worth more points. This isn’t unique to the Shine. I’ve seen people spinning at the gym wearing their fitness trackers on their ankles.

As the weeks passed, I found myself avoiding activities that didn’t register a lot of points, definitely not good behavior, and even though my goal was 1,000 points, I avoided raising it for fear of missing my daily goal-achievement dopamine high.

Then, mid-Summer, Misfit dropped an update that added some new game mechanics, and one day, my Shine app happily informed me that I’d hit my goal 22 days in a row.

This streak was the beginning of the end for me.

On the 29th day of my streak, the battery died. I replaced it, crisis averted, streak in tact. Then, later that day, the Shine inexplicably died. I tried several new batteries and finally had to contact support.

All the while, I worried about my streak. I went to gym, but it felt hollow and meaningless without the tangible representation, the coaching, as it were, from my Shine.

This is not a good look.

Misfit replaced my Shine, but in the days that elapsed, during my detox, I decided to let it go. Turns out the quantified self isn’t for obsessive, overly-competitive personality types like me.

And I’m not the only one in this group.

In September, I read an article called Stepping Out: Living the Fitbit Life, in which the author, David Sedaris, describes a similar obsession with his Fitbit. As I read it, I commiserated, but I also felt a little jealous of the level of his commitment. This dude makes me look like a rank amateur.

Definitely worth a read.

Anyway, this is not in any meant to be an indictment of the Shine, Fitbit, Jawbone or any fitness tracker. Overall, these devices offer people a positive and effective way to reenforce healthy behavior and habits.

But for people like, they lead to unanticipated side effects. As I read about the Up3, its sensors and Smart Coach, all of which sound very cool, I had to remind myself of the bad places where I went with the Shine.

And the colloquial, functionally-incorrect but very memorable, definition of insanity.

In Part 2, when I get around to it, I’ll discuss the flaws in the game mechanics these companies use.

Find the comments.Possibly Related Posts: