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Dimitri Gielis

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I created this Blog to share my knowledge especially in Oracle Application Express (APEX) and my feelings ...
Updated: 12 hours 53 min ago

Crowdsourced software development experiment

Thu, 2016-05-26 15:30
A few days ago I got an email about an experiment how to program with the crowd.
I didn't really heard about it before, but found it an interesting thought. In this experiment people will perform microtasks (10 minutes task), as a member of the crowd. People don't know each other, but will collaborate together. The system is distributing the work and supplies instructions. The challenge is in creating quality code that meets the specifications.
Job is still searching for some people to be part of the experiment, so I thought to put it on my blog, in case you're interested you find more details below and how to contact him.


Categories: Development

Please, use HTTPS for your APEX apps

Wed, 2016-05-25 16:07
Why use HTTPS?

When you Google this question you get many different answers, but this answer of Google Developers answers it for me in short (click the link for more details):
  • HTTPS protects the integrity of your website/APEX app
  • HTTPS protects the privacy and security of your users
  • HTTPS is the future of the web; many new technologies only work with https (for example Service Workers; you can read more about Service Workers and APEX in my presentation)
Industry going to HTTPS

Before websites had an HTTP portion and an HTTPS portion, which became active when you would login to the site, but nowadays everything is under HTTPS. Google will actually rank your site higher when it's using HTTPS. Look at the sites you visit; many of them will now use HTTPS as a default.

HTTPS on localhost

If you're developing locally, you don't really need HTTPS on localhost, but I still like to have that.
Here're the steps I did in Chrome on my Mac (OSX) to get the nice green lock when developing locally (works also with APEX Front-End Boost)
  • In the address bar, click the little lock with the X. This will bring up a small information screen. Click the button that says "Certificate Information."
  • Click and drag the certificate image to your desktop. 
  • Double-click it. This will bring up the Keychain Access utility. Enter your password to unlock it.
  • Be sure you add the certificate to the System keychain, NOT the login keychain. 
  • After it has been added, double-click it. 
  • Expand the "Trust" section. "When using this certificate," set to "Always Trust"
  • Close Keychain Access and restart Chrome, and your self-signed certificate should be recognized now by the browser.
HTTPS on your own server

For years I've been using SSL certificates ordered from Godaddy, but depending the certificate you get, it might not be that cheap. The APEX R&D website is a multi-site certificate - the same certificate is used for the APEX Office Print website.

But there's some good news... you can get SSL for free too (and it's very easy to do!), thanks to Letsencrypt. I used Letsencrypt to protect the Euro2016challenge.eu APEX app/website for example.
Here's the Getting Started Guide from Let's Encrypt. This is the command I used (after installing the package):

./letsencrypt-auto certonly --webroot -w /var/www/euro2016 -d euro2016challenge.eu -d www.euro2016challenge.eu


If you're not yet on https with your APEX app/site, I would definitely recommend looking into it :)

Categories: Development

Web technology in APEX Development

Fri, 2016-04-22 03:54
How did you get started with developing your first APEX app? 

My guess is either you went to https://apex.oracle.com and got a free account or Oracle Application Express was already in your company and somebody told you the url you could connect to. For me that is really the power of APEX, you just go to an url and within minutes you created your first app.

Staying within the APEX framework?

With APEX you create web application, but you don't have to worry about CSS, JavaScript, HTML5, Session State etc. it just comes with the framework. In APEX you have Universal Theme to visually adapt the look and feel of your app, there're Dynamic Actions that do all the JavaScript for you and the framework is generating all the HTML and processing that is necessary.
So although we are creating web applications, at first we are not doing what typical web developers do (creating html, css, javascript files).
Oracle closely looks at all the web technology, makes choices which streams they will follow (e.g. JQuery framework) and implements and tests it so we don't have to worry about a thing.

Going to the next level?

The web is evolving fast, and I mean really fast (!) so maybe you saw something really nice on the web you wish you had in your APEX app, but it's not yet declaratively available... now the nice thing about APEX is that you can extend it yourself by using plugins (see the plugins section on apex.world) or just by writing the code yourself as other web developers do.


Trying new web technology locally

When you want to try those shiny new web things in your APEX app, I recommend trying to get those things working locally first. Last year for example I gave a presentation about Web Components at different Oracle conferences and this year I'll present on Service Workers. All the research I did on those topics where initially not in an APEX context. But how do you get started to try this now?

The first thing you need is a local web server. Depending the OS you're on, you might already have one (e.g. IIS, Apache, ...), if not, here's what I do on OSX.
OSX comes with Python and that allows to create a simple web server.
Open Terminal and go to the directory where you want to test your local files and run:

$ python -m SimpleHTTPServer 8000   (Python 2.7)
$ python3 -m http.server 8000   (Python 3.0)

There're many other ways to have a local web server, see for example this article or a simple web server based on node.js.

The next thing is to start developing your HTML, CSS, JavaScript etc.
To do this development, you probably want some tools; an editor like Sublime or Atom, a CSS and JS preprocessor, Browser extensions, build tools like Gulp etc.
You don't need all those tools, just an editor is fine, but soon enough you want to be more efficient in your development, and tools just help :) Here're some nice articles about different tools: Google Developers - Getting Started, Keenan Payne 13 useful web dev tools and Scott Ge list of web development tools.

Going from custom web development to APEX - use APEX Front-End Boost

So you have your local files developed and next is to integrate them in your APEX app.
You add some code to your APEX pages and upload the files so APEX can see them.
If everything works immediately - great, but most of the time you probably need to make more changes, so you change your local files, test again, upload etc. You could streamline this a bit with setting up a proxy or referencing localhost files while in development... But then you're happy your part of the APEX community...


To ease the above development and integration with APEX, Vincent Morneau and Martin Giffy D'Souza created the excellent APEX Front-End Boost package. The package is using many of the above tools behind the scenes, but it's all integrated in a nice box. This video goes in full detail what the tool is doing for you and how to use it. In short; it fills the bridge of working with a file locally, making it production ready and seeing it immediately in your APEX app :)

In the next post I'll talk about the importance of using https and also setting it up for localhost (also for APEX Front-End Boost).

    Categories: Development