Skip navigation.

Pythian Group

Syndicate content
Official Pythian Blog - Love Your Data
Updated: 7 hours 27 min ago

Log Buffer #393, A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Fri, 2014-10-17 07:47

Bloggers get connected to both the databases and their readers through their blogs. Bloggers act like a bridge here. Log Buffer extends this nexus through the Log Buffer Edition.

Oracle:

MS Sharepoint and Oracle APEX integration.

Just a couple of screenshots of sqlplus+rlwrap+cygwin+console.

Say “Big Data” One More Time (I dare you!)

Update OEM Harvester after 12.1.0.4 Upgrade

Insight in the Roadmap for Oracle Cloud Platform Services.

SQL Server:

Troubleshoot SQL P2P replication doesn’t replicate DDL schema change.

Set-based Constraint Violation Reporting in SQL Server.

Where do you start fixing a SQL Server crash when there isn’t a single clue?

A permission gives a principal access to an object to perform certain actions on or with the object.

When you can’t get to your data because another application has it locked, a thorough knowledge of SQL Server concurrency will give you the confidence to decide what to do.

MySQL:

MySQL 5.7.5- More variables in replication performance_schema tables.

Multi-source replication for MySQL has been released as a part of 5.7.5-labs-preview downloadable from labs.mysql.com.

How to install multiple MySQL instances on a single host using MyEnv?

Percona Toolkit for MySQL with MySQL-SSL Connections.

InnoDB: Supporting Page Sizes of 32k and 64k.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Deploying a Private Cloud at Home — Part 4

Thu, 2014-10-16 09:11

Today’s blog post is part four of seven in a series dedicated to Deploying Private Cloud at Home, where I will be demonstrating how to configure Imaging and compute services on controller node. See my previous blog post where we began configuring Keystone Identity Service.

  1. Install the Imaging service
    yum install -y openstack-glance python-glanceclient
  2. Configure Glance (Imaging Service) to use MySQL database
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-api.conf database connection \
    mysql://glance:Your_Password@controller/glance
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-registry.conf database connection \
    mysql://glance:Youre_Password@controller/glance
  3. Create Glance database user by running below queries on your MySQL prompt as root
    CREATE DATABASE glance;
    GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON glance.* TO 'glance'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'Your_Password';
    GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON glance.* TO 'glance'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'Your_Password';
  4. Create the database tables for the Image Service
    su -s /bin/sh -c "glance-manage db_sync" glance
  5. Create Glance user to communicate to OpenStack services and Identity services
    keystone user-create --name=glance --pass=Your_Password --email=Your_Email
    keystone user-role-add --user=glance --tenant=service --role=admin
  6. Configuration of Glance config files
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-api.conf keystone_authtoken auth_uri http://controller:5000
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-api.conf keystone_authtoken auth_host controller
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-api.conf keystone_authtoken auth_port 35357
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-api.conf keystone_authtoken auth_protocol http
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-api.conf keystone_authtoken admin_tenant_name service
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-api.conf keystone_authtoken admin_user glance
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-api.conf keystone_authtoken admin_password Your_Password
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-api.conf paste_deploy flavor keystone
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-registry.conf keystone_authtoken auth_uri http://controller:5000
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-registry.conf keystone_authtoken auth_host controller
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-registry.conf keystone_authtoken auth_port 35357
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-registry.conf keystone_authtoken auth_protocol http
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-registry.conf keystone_authtoken admin_tenant_name service
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-registry.conf keystone_authtoken admin_user glance
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-registry.conf keystone_authtoken admin_password Your_Password
    openstack-config --set /etc/glance/glance-registry.conf paste_deploy flavor keystone
  7. Register the Image Service with the Identity service
    keystone service-create --name=glance --type=image --description="OpenStack Image Service"
    keystone endpoint-create \
      --service-id=$(keystone service-list | awk '/ image / {print $2}') \
      --publicurl=http://controller:9292 \
      --internalurl=http://controller:9292 \
      --adminurl=http://controller:9292
  8. Start the Glance-api and Glance-registry services and enable them to start at startup
    service openstack-glance-api start
    service openstack-glance-registry start
    chkconfig openstack-glance-api on
    chkconfig openstack-glance-registry on
  9. Download CirrOS cloud image which is created for testing purpose
    wget -q http://cdn.download.cirros-cloud.net/0.3.2/cirros-0.3.2-x86_64-disk.img \
    -O /root/cirros-0.3.2-x86_64-disk.img
  10. Upload the image to Glance using admin account
    source /root/admin-openrc.sh
    glance image-create --name "cirros-0.3.2-x86_64" \
    --disk-format qcow2 \
    --container-format bare \
    --is-public True \
    --progress < /root/cirros-0.3.2-x86_64-disk.img
  11. Install Compute controller service on controller node
    yum install -y openstack-nova-api openstack-nova-cert \
    openstack-nova-conductor openstack-nova-console \
    openstack-nova-novncproxy openstack-nova-scheduler \
    python-novaclient
  12. Configure compute service database
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf database connection mysql://nova:Your_Password@controller/nova
  13. Configure compute service configuration file
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf DEFAULT rpc_backend qpid
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf DEFAULT qpid_hostname controller
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf DEFAULT my_ip Controller_IP
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf DEFAULT vncserver_listen Controller_IP
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf DEFAULT vncserver_proxyclient_address Controller_IP
  14. Create nova database user by running below queries on your MySQL prompt as root
    CREATE DATABASE nova;
    GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON nova.* TO 'nova'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'Your_Password';
    GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON nova.* TO 'nova'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'Your_Password';
  15. Create Compute service tables
    su -s /bin/sh -c "nova-manage db sync" nova
  16. Create a nova user that Compute uses to authenticate with the Identity Service
    keystone user-create --name=nova --pass=Your_Passoword --email=Your_Email
    keystone user-role-add --user=nova --tenant=service --role=admin
  17. Configure Compute to use these credentials with the Identity Service running on the controller
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf DEFAULT auth_strategy keystone
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf keystone_authtoken auth_uri http://controller:5000
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf keystone_authtoken auth_host controller
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf keystone_authtoken auth_protocol http
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf keystone_authtoken auth_port 35357
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf keystone_authtoken admin_user nova
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf keystone_authtoken admin_tenant_name service
    openstack-config --set /etc/nova/nova.conf keystone_authtoken admin_password Your_Password
  18. Register Compute with the Identity Service
    keystone service-create --name=nova --type=compute --description="OpenStack Compute"
    keystone endpoint-create \
      --service-id=$(keystone service-list | awk '/ compute / {print $2}') \
      --publicurl=http://controller:8774/v2/%\(tenant_id\)s \
      --internalurl=http://controller:8774/v2/%\(tenant_id\)s \
      --adminurl=http://controller:8774/v2/%\(tenant_id\\)s
  19. Now start Compute services and configure them to start when the system boots
    service openstack-nova-api start
    service openstack-nova-cert start
    service openstack-nova-consoleauth start
    service openstack-nova-scheduler start
    service openstack-nova-conductor start
    service openstack-nova-novncproxy start
    chkconfig openstack-nova-api on
    chkconfig openstack-nova-cert on
    chkconfig openstack-nova-consoleauth on
    chkconfig openstack-nova-scheduler on
    chkconfig openstack-nova-conductor on
    chkconfig openstack-nova-novncproxy on
  20. You can verify your configuration and list available images
    source /root/admin-openrc.sh
    nova image-list

 

This concludes the initial configuration of controller node before configuration of compute node. Stay tuned for part five where I will demonstrate how to configure compute node.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Deploying a Private Cloud at Home — Part 3

Tue, 2014-10-14 14:59

Today’s blog post is part three of seven in a series dedicated to Deploying Private Cloud at Home, where I will demonstrate how to configure OpenStack Identity service on the controller node. We have already configured the required repo in part two of the series, so let’s get started on configuring Keystone Identity Service.

  1. Install keystone on the controller node.
    yum install -y openstack-keystone python-keystoneclient

    OpenStack uses a message broker to coordinate operations and status information among services. The message broker service typically runs on the controller node. OpenStack supports several message brokers including RabbitMQ, Qpid, and ZeroMQ.I am using Qpid as it is available on most of the distros

  2. Install Qpid Messagebroker server.
    yum install -y qpid-cpp-server

    Now Modify the qpid configuration file to disable authentication by changing below line in /etc/qpidd.conf

    auth=no

    Now start and enable qpid service to start on server startup

    chkconfig qpidd on
    service qpidd start
  3. Now configure keystone to use MySQL database
    openstack-config --set /etc/keystone/keystone.conf \
       database connection mysql://keystone:YOUR_PASSWORD@controller/keystone
  4. Next create keystone database user by running below queries on your mysql prompt as root.
    CREATE DATABASE keystone;
    GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON keystone.* TO 'keystone'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'YOUR_PASSWORD';
    GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON keystone.* TO 'keystone'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'YOUR_PASSWORD';
  5. Now create database tables
    su -s /bin/sh -c "keystone-manage db_sync" keystone

    Currently we don’t have any user accounts that can communicate with OpenStack services and Identity service. So we will setup an authorization token to use as a shared secret between the Identity Service and other OpenStack services and store in configuration file.

    ADMIN_TOKEN=$(openssl rand -hex 10)
    echo $ADMIN_TOKEN
    openstack-config --set /etc/keystone/keystone.conf DEFAULT \
       admin_token $ADMIN_TOKEN
  6. Keystone uses PKI tokens as default. Now create the signing keys and certificates to restrict access to the generated data
    keystone-manage pki_setup --keystone-user keystone --keystone-group keystone
    chown -R keystone:keystone /etc/keystone/ssl
    chmod -R o-rwx /etc/keystone/ssl
  7. Start and enable the keystone identity service to begin at startup
    service openstack-keystone start
    chkconfig openstack-keystone on

    Keystone Identity service stores expired tokens as well in the database. We will create below crontab entry to purge the expired tokens

    (crontab -l -u keystone 2>&1 | grep -q token_flush) || \
    echo '@hourly /usr/bin/keystone-manage token_flush >/var/log/keystone/keystone-tokenflush.log 2>&1' >> /var/spool/cron/keystone
  8. Now we will create admin user for keystone and define roles for admin user
    export OS_SERVICE_TOKEN=$ADMIN_TOKEN
    export OS_SERVICE_ENDPOINT=http://controller:35357/v2.0
    keystone user-create --name=admin --pass=Your_Password --email=Your_Email
    keystone role-create --name=admin
    keystone tenant-create --name=admin --description="Admin Tenant"
    keystone user-role-add --user=admin --tenant=admin --role=admin
    keystone user-role-add --user=admin --role=_member_ --tenant=admin
    keystone user-create --name=pythian --pass= Your_Password --email=Your_Email
    keystone tenant-create --name=pythian --description="Pythian Tenant"
    keystone user-role-add --user=pythian --role=_member_ --tenant=pythian
    keystone tenant-create --name=service --description="Service Tenant"
  9. Now we create a service entry for the identity service
    keystone service-create --name=keystone --type=identity --description="OpenStack Identity"
    keystone endpoint-create --service-id=$(keystone service-list | awk '/ identity / {print $2}') \
    --publicurl=http://controller:5000/v2.0 \
    --internalurl=http://controller:5000/v2.0 \
    --adminurl=http://controller:35357/v2.0
  10. Verify Identity service installation
    unset OS_SERVICE_TOKEN OS_SERVICE_ENDPOINT
  11. Request an authentication token by using the admin user and the password you chose for that user
    keystone --os-username=admin --os-password=Your_Password \
      --os-auth-url=http://controller:35357/v2.0 token-get
    keystone --os-username=admin --os-password=Your_Password \
      --os-tenant-name=admin --os-auth-url=http://controller:35357/v2.0 \
      token-get
  12. We will save the required parameters in admin-openrc.sh as below
    export OS_USERNAME=admin
    export OS_PASSWORD=Your_Password
    export OS_TENANT_NAME=admin
    export OS_AUTH_URL=http://controller:35357/v2.0
  13. Next Next check if everything is working fine and keystone interacts with OpenStack services. We will source the admin-openrc.sh file to load the keystone parameters
    source /root/admin-openrc.sh
  14. List Keystone tokens using:
    keystone token-get
  15. List Keystone users using
    keystone user-list

If all the above commands give you the output, that means your Keystone Identity Service is all set up, and you can proceed to the next steps—In part four, I will discuss on how to configure and set up Image Service to store images.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Oracle E-Business Suite Updates From OpenWorld 2014

Tue, 2014-10-14 08:29

Oracle OpenWorld has always been my most exciting conference to attend. I always see high energy levels everywhere, and it kind of revs me up to tackle new upcoming technologies. This year I concentrated on attending mostly Oracle E-Business Suite release 12.2 and Oracle 12c Database-related sessions.

On the Oracle E-Business Suite side, I started off with Oracle EBS Customer Advisory Board Meeting with great presentations on new features like the Oracle EBS 12.2.4 new iPad Touch-friendly interface. This can be enabled by setting “Self Service Personal Home Page mode” profile value to “Framework Simplified”. Also discussed some pros and cons of the new downtime mode feature of adop Online patching utility that allows  release update packs ( like 12.2.3 and 12.2.4 patch ) to be applied with out starting up a new online patching session. I will cover more details about that in a separate blog post. In the mean time take a look at the simplified home page look of my 12.2.4 sandbox instance.

Oracle EBS 12.2.4 Simplified Interface

Steven Chan’s presentation on EBS Certification Roadmap announced upcoming support for Android tablets Chrome Browser, IE11 and Oracle Unified Directory etc. Oracle did not extend any support deadlines for Oracle EBS 11i or R12 this time. So to all EBS customers on 11i: It’s time to move to R12.2. I also attended a good session on testing best practices for Oracle E-Business Suite, which had a good slide on some extra testing required during Online Patching Cycle. I am planning to do a separate blog with more details on that, as it is an important piece of information that one might ignore. Also Oracle announced a new product called Flow Builder that is part of Oracle Application Testing Suite, which helps users test functional flows in Oracle EBS.

On the 12c Database side, I attended great sessions by Christian Antognini on Adaptive Query Optimization and Markus Michalewicz sessions on 12c RAC Operational Best Practices and RAC Cache Fusion Internals. Markus Cachefusion presentation has some great recommendations on using _gc_policy_minimum instead of turning off DRM completely using _gc_policy_time=0. Also now there is a way to control DRM of a object using package DBMS_CACHEUTIL.

I also attended attended some new, upcoming technologies that are picking up in the Oracle space like Oracle NoSQL, Oracle Big Data SQL, and Oracle Data Integrator Hadoop connectors. These products seem to have great future ahead and have good chances of becoming mainstream in the data warehousing side of businesses.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Deploying a Private Cloud at Home — Part 2

Fri, 2014-10-10 08:34

Today’s blog post is part two of seven in a series dedicated to Deploying Private Cloud at Home, where I will demonstrate how to do basic configuration setup to get started with OpenStack. In my first blog post, I explained why I decided to use OpenStack.

I am using a two-node setup in my environment, but you can still follow these steps and configure everything on single node. The below configuration reflects my setup. Kindly modify it as per your subnet and settings.

  • My home network has subnet of 192.168.1.0/24
  • My home PC which I am turning into controller node has IP of 192.168.1.140
  • MY KVM Hypervisor which I am turning to compute node has IP of 192.168.1.142
  1. It is advisable to have DNS setup in your intranet but just in case you don’t have it, you need to modify /etc/hosts file on both controller and compute node in order for OpenStack services to communicate to each other like below
    #Controller node
    192.168.1.140 controller
    #Compute node
    192.168.1.142 compute
  2. OpenStack services require a database to store information. You can use any database you are familiar with. I am using MySQL/MariaDB, as I am familiar with it. On the controller node, we will install the MySQL client and server packages, and the Python library.
     yum install -y mysql mysql-server MySQL-python
  3. Enable InnoDB, UTF-8 character set, and UTF-8 collation by default. To do that we need to modify /etc/my.cnf and set the following keys under [mysqld] section.
    default-storage-engine = innodb 
    innodb_file_per_table 
    collation-server = utf8_general_ci 
    init-connect = 'SET NAMES utf8' 
    character-set-server = utf8
  4. Start and enable the MySQL services
    service mysqld start
    chkconfig mysqld on
  5. Finally, set the root password for MySQL database. If you need further details about configuring the MySQL root password, there are many resources available online.
  6. On the compute node we need to install the MySQL Python library
    yum install -y MySQL-python
  7. Set up RDO repository on both controller and compute nodes
    yum install -y http://repos.fedorapeople.org/repos/openstack/openstack-icehouse/rdo-release-icehouse-4.noarch.rpm
  8. I am using CentOS 6.2 so I need to have epel repo as well. This step is not required if you are using distro other then RHEL, CentOS, Scientific Linux etc.
    yum install http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm
  9. Install OpenStack utilities on both nodes and get started.
    yum install openstack-utils

Stay tuned for the remainder of my series, Deploying a Private Cloud at Home. In part three, we will continue configuring OpenStack services.

Categories: DBA Blogs

SQL Saturday Bulgaria 2014

Fri, 2014-10-10 08:22

 

This Saturday October 11, I will be speaking at SQL Saturday Bulgaria 2014 in Sofia. It’s my first time in the country and I’m really excited to be part of another SQL Saturday :)

I will be speaking about Buffer Pool Extension, a new feature on SQL Server 2014. If you want to learn a little more about the new SQL Server version, don’t hesitate to attend the event. Looking forward to seeing you there!

Categories: DBA Blogs

Log Buffer #392, A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Fri, 2014-10-10 08:19

It seems its all about cloud these days. Even the hardware is being marketed with cloud in perspective. Databases like Oracle, SQL Server and MySQL are ahead in the cloud game and this Log Buffer Edition covers that all.


Oracle:

Oracle Database 12c was launched over a year ago delivering the next-generation of the #1 database, designed to meet modern business needs, providing a new multitenant architecture on top of a fast, scalable, reliable, and secure database platform.

Oracle OpenWorld 2014 Session Presentations Now Available.

Today, Oracle is using big data technology and concepts to significantly improve the effectiveness of its support operations, starting with its hardware support group.

Generating Sales Cloud Proxies using Axis? Getting errors?

How many page views can Apex sustain when running on Oracle XE?

SQL Server:

Send emails using SSIS and SQL Server instead of application-level code.

The public perception is that, when something is deleted, it no longer exists. Often that’s not really the case; the data you serve up to the cloud can be stored out there indefinitely, no matter how hard to try to delete it.

Every day, out in the various online forums devoted to SQL Server, and on Twitter, the same types of questions come up repeatedly: Why is this query running slowly? Why is SQL Server ignoring my index? Why does this query run quickly sometimes and slowly at others?

You need to set up backup and restore strategies to recover data or minimize the risk of data loss in case a failure happens.

Improving the Quality of SQL Server Database Connections in the Cloud

MySQL:

Low-concurrency performance for updates and the Heap engine: MySQL 5.7 vs previous releases.

Database Automation – Private DBaaS for MySQL, MariaDB and MongoDB with ClusterControl.

Removing Scalability Bottlenecks in the Metadata Locking and THR_LOCK Subsystems in MySQL 5.7.

The EXPLAIN command is one of MySQL’s most useful tools for understanding query performance. When you EXPLAIN a query, MySQL will return the plan created by the query optimizer.

Shinguz: Migration between MySQL/Percona Server and MariaDB.

Categories: DBA Blogs

What is Continuous Integration?

Thu, 2014-10-09 10:44

Most companies want to deploy features faster, and fix bugs more quickly—at the same time, a stable product that delivers what the users expected is crucial to winning and keeping the trust of those users.  At face value, stability and Lego Trainspeed appear to be in conflict; developers can either spend their time on features or on stability.  In reality, problems delivering on stability as well as problems implementing new features are both related to a lack of visibility.  Developers can’t answer a very basic question: What will be impacted by my change?

When incompatible changes hit the production servers as a result of bug fixes or new features, they have to be tracked down and resolved.  Fighting these fires is unproductive, costly, and prevents developers from building new features.

The goal of Continuous Integration (CI) is to break out of the mentality of firefighting—it gives developers more time to work on features, by baking stability into the process through testing.

Sample Workflow
  1. Document the intended feature
  2. Write one or more integration tests to validate that the feature functions as desired
  3. Develop the feature
  4. Release the feature

This workflow doesn’t include an integration step—code goes out automatically when all the tests pass. Since all the tests can be run automatically, by a testing system like Jenkins, a failure in any test, even those outside of the developers control, constitutes a break which must be fixed before continuing.  Of course in some cases, users follow paths other than those designed and explicitly tested by developers and bugs happen.  New testing is required to validate that bugs are fixed and these contribute to a library of tests which collectively increase collective confidence in the codebase.  Most importantly, the library of tests limits the scope of any bug which increases the confidence of developers to move faster.

Testing is the Secret Sauce

As the workflow illustrates, the better the tests, the more stable the application.  Instead of trying to determine which parts of the application might be impacted by a change, the tests can prove that things still work, as designed.

 

Continuous Integration is just one of the many ways our DevOps group engages with clients. We also build clouds and solve difficult infrastructure problems. Does that sound interesting to you? Want to come work with us? Get in touch!

Categories: DBA Blogs

Deploying a Private Cloud at Home — Part 1

Wed, 2014-10-08 08:17

Today’s blog post is part one of seven in a series dedicated to Deploying a Private Cloud at Home. In my day-to-day activities, I come across various scenarios where I’m required to do sandbox testing before proceeding further on the production environment—which is great because it allows me to sharpen and develop my skills.

My home network consists of an OpenFiler NAS which also serves DNS, DHCP, iSCSI, NFS and Samba in my network. My home PC is a Fedora 20 Workstation, where I do most of the personal activities.  KVM hypervisor is running on CentOS 6.2 x86_64 to run sandbox VMs for testing.

Recently I decided to move it to the cloud and create a private cloud at home. There are plenty of open source cloud solutions available, but I decided to use OpenStack for two reasons.

  1. I am already running Redhat compatible distros ( CentOS and Fedora ) so I just need to install OpenStack on top of it to get started.
  2. Most of the clients I support have RHEL compatible distros in the environment, so it makes sense having RHEL compatible distros to play around.

Ideally OpenStack cloud consists of minimum three nodes with at least 2 NICs on each node.

  • Controller: As the name suggests, this is the controller node which runs most of the control services.
  • Network: This is the network node which handles virtual networking.
  • Compute : This is the hypervisor node which runs your VMs.

However due to small size of my home network I decided to use legacy networking which only requires controller and compute nodes with single NIC

Stay tuned for the remainder of my series, Deploying a Private Cloud at Home. In part two of seven, I will be demonstrating configuration and setup.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Microsoft Hadoop: Taming the Big Challenge of Big Data – Part Three

Mon, 2014-10-06 11:57

Today’s blog post completes our three-part series with excerpts from our latest white paper, Microsoft Hadoop: Taming the Big Challenge of Big Data. In the first two posts, we discussed the impact of big data on today’s organizations, and its challenges.

Today, we’ll be sharing what organizations can accomplish by using the Microsoft Hadoop solution:

  1. Improve agility. Because companies now have the ability to collect and analyze data essentially in real time, they can more quickly discover which business strategies are working and which are not, and make adjustments as necessary.
  2. Increase innovation. By integrating structured and unstructured data sources, the solution provides decision makers with greater insight into all the factors affecting the business and encouraging new ways of thinking about opportunities and challenges.
  3. Reduce inefficiencies. Data that currently resides in conventional data management systems can be migrated into Parallel Data Warehouse (PDW) for faster information delivery
  4. Better allocate IT resources. The Microsoft Hadoop solution includes a powerful, intuitive interface for installing, configuring, and managing the technology, freeing up IT staff to work on projects that provide higher value to the organization.
  5. Decrease costs. Previously, because of the inability to effectively analyze big data, much of it was dumped into data warehouses on commodity hardware, which is no longer required thanks to Hadoop.

Download our full white paper to learn which companies are currently benefiting from Hadoop, and how you can achieve the maximum ROI from the Microsoft Hadoop solution.

Don’t forget to check out part one and part two of our Microsoft Hadoop blog series.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Log Buffer #391, A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Fri, 2014-10-03 08:04

Oracle Open World is in full bloom. Enthusiasts of Oracle and MySQL are flocking to extract as much knowledge, news, and fun as possible. SQL Server aficionados are not far behind too.

Oracle:

Frank Nimphius have announced REST support for ADF BC feature on OOW today. Probably this functionality will be available in the next JDeveloper 12c update release.

RMAN Enhancements New Privilege A new SYSBACKUP privilege is created in Oracle 12c,  it allows the grantee to perform BACKUP and RECOVERY operations with RMAN SQL in RMAN.

To continue with the objective of separating duties and the least privileges, Oracle 12c introduce new administrative privileges all destined to accomplish specific duties.

Unified Auditing offers a consolidated approach, all the audit data is consolidated in a single place. Unified Auditing consolidate audit records for the following sources.

SOA Suite 12c – WSM-02141 : Unable to connect to the policy access service.

SQL Server:

Data Compression and Snapshot Isolation don’t play well together, you may not see a performance benefit.

Tim Smith answers some questions on SQL Server security like: Is It Better To Mask At the Application Level Or The SQL Server Database Level?

Since SQL Server delivered the entire range of window functions, there has been far less justification for using the non-standard ex-Sybase ‘Quirky Update’ tricks to perform the many permutations of running totals in SQL Server.

Easily synchronize live Salesforce data with SQL Server using the Salesforce SSIS DataFlow Tasks.

Change All Computed Columns to Persisted in SQL Server.

MySQL:

Low-concurrency performance for point lookups: MySQL 5.7.5 vs previous releases.

How to get MySQL 5.6 parallel replication and XtraBackup to play nice together.

The InnoDB labs release includes a snapshot of the InnoDB Native Partitioning feature.

Visualizing the impact of ordered vs. random index insertion in InnoDB.

Single thread performance in MySQL 5.7.5 versus older releases via sql-bench.

Categories: DBA Blogs

Microsoft Hadoop: Taming the Big Challenge of Big Data – Part Two

Thu, 2014-10-02 11:13

Today’s blog post is the second in a three-part series with excerpts from our latest white paper, Microsoft Hadoop: Taming the Big Challenge of Big Data. In our first blog post, we revealed just how much data is being generated globally every minute – and that it has doubled since 2011.

Traditional database management tools were not designed to handle the elements that make big data so much more complex—namely its key differentiators: volume, variety, and velocity.Variety Volume Velocity graphic

Volume is the quantity of data, variety refers to the type of data collected (image, audio, video, etc.), and velocity is its expected growth rate. Many people assume that big data always includes high volume and intuitively understand the
challenges that it presents. In reality, however, data variety and velocity are much more likely to prevent traditional management tools from being able to efficiently capture, store, report, analyze, and archive the data, regardless of volume.

Download our full white paper which explores the technical and business advantages of effectively managing big data, regardless of quantity, scope, or speed.

 

Categories: DBA Blogs