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The Benefits of Integrating a Google Search Appliance with an Oracle WebCenter or Liferay Portal

This month, the Fishbowl team presented two webinars on integrating a Google Search Appliance with a WebCenter or Liferay Portal. Our new product, the GSA Portal Search Suite, makes integration simple and also allows for customization to create a seamless, secure search experience. It brings a powerful, Google-like search experience directly to your portal.

The first webinar, “The Benefits of Google Search for your Oracle WebCenter or Liferay Portal”, focused on the Google Search Appliance and the positive experiences users have had with incorporating Google search in the enterprise.

 

The second webinar, “Integrating the Google Search Appliance with a WebCenter or Liferay Portal”, dove deeper into how the GSA Portal Search Suite and how it improves the integration process.

 

The following is a list of questions and answers from the webinar series. If you have any other questions, please feel free to reach out to the Fishbowl team!

Q. What version of SharePoint does this product work with?

A. This product is not designed to work with SharePoint. Google has a SharePoint connector that indexes content from SharePoint and pulls it into the GSA, and then the GSA Portal Search Suite would allow any of that content to be served up in your portal.

Fishbowl also has a product called SharePoint Connector that connects SharePoint with Oracle WebCenter Content.

Q. Is Fishbowl a reseller of the GSA? Where can I get a GSA?

A. Yes, we sell the GSA, as well as add-on products and consulting services for the GSA. Visit our website for more information about our GSA services.

Q. What is the difficulty level of customizing the XSLT front end? How long would it take to roll out?

A. This will depend on what you’re trying to customize. If it’s just colors, headers, etc., you could do it pretty quickly because the difficulty level is fairly low. If you’re looking at doing a full-scale customization and entirely changing the look and feel, that could take a lot longer – I would say upwards of a month. The real challenge is that there isn’t a lot of documentation from Google on how to do it, so you would have to do a lot of experimentation.

One of the reasons we created this product is because most customers haven’t been able to fully customize their GSA with a portal, partly because Google didn’t design it to be customizable in this way.

Q. What versions of Liferay does this product support?

A. It supports version 6.2. If you have another version you’d like to integrate with, you can follow up with our team and we can discuss the possibility of working with other versions.

Q. Do you have a connector for IBM WCM?

A. Fishbowl does not have a connector, but Google has a number of connectors that can integrate with many different types of software.

Q. Are you talking about WebCenter Portal or WCM?

A. This connector is designed for WebCenter Portal. If you’re talking about WCM as in SiteStudio or WebCenter Content, we have done a number of projects with those programs. This particular product wouldn’t apply to those situations, but we have other connectors that would work with programs such as WebCenter Content.

Q. Where is the portlet deployed? Is it on the same managed node?

A. The portlets are deployed on the portlet server in WebCenter Portal.

Q. Where can we get the documentation for this product?

A. While the documentation is not publically available, we do have a product page on the website that includes a lot of information on the Portal Search Suite. Contact your Fishbowl representative if you’d like to learn more about it.

Q. What are the server requirements?

A. WebCenter Portal 11g or Liferay 6.2 and Google Search Appliance 7.2.

Q. Does this product include the connector for indexing content?

A. No, this product does not include a connector. We do have a product called GSA Connector for WebCenter that indexes content and then allows you to integrate that content with a portal. Depending on how your portal is configured, you could also crawl the portal just like you would in a regular website. However, this product focuses exclusively on serving and not on indexing.

Q. How many portals will a GSA support? I have several WebCenter Content domains on the same server.

A. The GSA is licensed according to number of content items, not number of sources. You purchase a license for a certain number of content items and then it doesn’t matter how many domains the content is coming from.

The post The Benefits of Integrating a Google Search Appliance with an Oracle WebCenter or Liferay Portal appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Is analytic data management finally headed for the cloud?

DBMS2 - Wed, 2014-10-22 02:48

It seems reasonable to wonder whether analytic data management is headed for the cloud. In no particular order:

  • Amazon Redshift appears to be prospering.
  • So are some SaaS (Software as a Service) business intelligence vendors.
  • Amazon Elastic MapReduce is still around.
  • Snowflake Computing launched with a cloud strategy.
  • Cazena, with vague intentions for cloud data warehousing, destealthed.*
  • Cloudera made various cloud-related announcements.
  • Data is increasingly machine-generated, and machine-generated data commonly originates off-premises.
  • The general argument for cloud-or-at-least-colocation has compelling aspects.
  • Analytic workloads can be “bursty”, and so could benefit from true cloud elasticity.

Also — although the specifics on this are generally vague and/or confidential — I sense a narrowing of the gap between:

  • The hardware + networking required for performant analytic data management.
  • The hardware + networking available in the cloud.

*Cazena is proud of its team of advisors. However, the only person yet announced for a Cazena operating role is Prat Moghe, and his time period in Netezza’s mainstream happens not to have been one in which Netezza had much technical or market accomplishment.

On the other hand:

  • If you have processing power very close to the data, then you can avoid a lot of I/O or data movement. Many cloud configurations do not support this.
  • Many optimizations depend upon controlling or at least knowing the hardware and networking set-up. Public clouds rarely offer that level of control.

And so I’m still more confident in SaaS/colocation analytic data management, or in Redshift, than I am in true arm’s-length cloud-based systems.

Categories: Other

Snowflake Computing

DBMS2 - Wed, 2014-10-22 02:45

I talked with the Snowflake Computing guys Friday. For starters:

  • Snowflake is offering an analytic DBMS on a SaaS (Software as a Service) basis.
  • The Snowflake DBMS is built from scratch (as opposed, to for example, being based on PostgreSQL or Hadoop).
  • The Snowflake DBMS is columnar and append-only, as has become common for analytic RDBMS.
  • Snowflake claims excellent SQL coverage for a 1.0 product.
  • Snowflake, the company, has:
    • 50 people.
    • A similar number of current or past users.
    • 5 referenceable customers.
    • 2 techie founders out of Oracle, plus Marcin Zukowski.
    • Bob Muglia as CEO.

Much of the Snowflake story can be summarized as cloud/elastic/simple/cheap.*

*Excuse me — inexpensive. Companies rarely like their products to be labeled as “cheap”.

In addition to its purely relational functionality, Snowflake accepts poly-structured data. Notes on that start:

  • Ingest formats are JSON, XML or AVRO for now.
  • I gather that the system automagically decides which fields/attributes are sufficiently repeated to be broken out as separate columns; also, there’s a column for the documents themselves.

I don’t know enough details to judge whether I’d call that an example of schema-on-need.

A key element of Snowflake’s poly-structured data story seems to be lateral views. I’m not too clear on that concept, but I gather:

  • A lateral view is something like a join on a table function, inner or outer join as the case may be.
  • “Lateral view” is an Oracle term, while “Cross apply” is the term for the same thing in Microsoft SQL Server.
  • Lateral views are one of the ways of making SQL handle hierarchical data structures (others evidently are WITH and CONNECT BY).

Lateral views seem central to how Snowflake handles nested data structures. I presume Snowflake also uses or plans to use them in more traditional ways (subqueries, table functions, and/or complex FROM clauses).

If anybody has a good link explaining lateral views, please be so kind as to share! Elementary googling isn’t turning much up, and the Snowflake folks didn’t send over anything clearer than this and this.

Highlights of Snowflake’s cloud/elastic/simple/inexpensive story include:

  • Snowflake’s product is SaaS-only for the foreseeable future.
  • Data is stored in compressed 16 megabyte files on Amazon S3, and pulled into Amazon EC2 servers for query execution on an as-needed basis. Allegedly …
  • … this makes data storage significantly cheaper than it would be in, for example, an Amazon version of HDFS (Hadoop Distributed File System).
  • When you fire up Snowflake, you get a “virtual data warehouse” across one or more nodes. You can have multiple “virtual data warehouses” accessing identical or overlapping sets of data. Each of these “virtual data warehouses” has a physical copy of the data; i.e., this is not related to the Oliver Ratzesberger concept of a virtual data mart defined by workload management.
  • Snowflake has no indexes. It does have zone maps, aka data skipping. (Speaking of simple/inexpensive — both those aspects remind me of Netezza.)
  • Snowflake doesn’t distribute data on any kind of key. I.e. it’s round-robin. (I think that’s accurate; they didn’t have time to get back to me and confirm.)
  • This is not an in-memory story. Data pulled onto Snowflake’s EC2 nodes will commonly wind up in their local storage.

Snowflake pricing is based on the sum of:

  • Per EC2 server-hour, for a couple classes of node.
  • Per S3 terabyte-month of compressed storage.

Right now the cheaper class of EC2 node uses spinning disk, while the more expensive uses flash; soon they’ll both use flash.

DBMS 1.0 versions are notoriously immature, but Snowflake seems — or at least seems to think it is — further ahead than is typical.

  • Snowflake’s optimizer is fully cost-based.
  • Snowflake thinks it has strong SQL coverage, including a large fraction of SQL 2003 Analytics. Apparently Snowflake has run every TPC-H and TPC-DS query in-house, except that one TPC-DS query relied on a funky rewrite or something like that.
  • Snowflake bravely thinks that it’s licked concurrency from Day 1; you just fire up multiple identical virtual DWs if needed to handle the query load. (Note: The set of Version 1 DBMS without concurrent-usage bottlenecks has cardinality very close to 0.)
  • Similarly, Snowflake encourages you to fire up a separate load-only DW instance, and load mainly through trickle feeds.
  • Snowflake’s SaaS-only deployment obviates — or at least obscures :) — a variety of management, administration, etc. features that often are lacking in early DBMS releases.

Other DBMS technology notes include:

  • Compression is columnar (various algorithms, including file-at-a-time dictionary/token).
  • Joins and other database operations are performed on compressed data. (Yay!)
  • Those 16-megabyte files are column-organized and immutable. This strongly suggests which kinds of writes can or can’t be done efficiently. :) Note that adding a column — perhaps of derived data — is one of the things that could go well.
  • There’s some kind of conflict resolution if multiple virtual DWs try to write the same records — but as per the previous point, the kinds of writes for which that’s an issue should be rare anyway.

In the end, a lot boils down to how attractive Snowflake’s prices wind up being. What I can say now is:

  • I don’t actually know Snowflake’s pricing …
  • … nor the amount of work it can do per node.
  • It’s hard to imagine that passing queries from EC2 to S3 is going to give great performance. So Snowflake is more likely to do well when whatever parts of the database wind up being “cached” in the flash of the EC2 servers suffice to answer most queries.
  • In theory, Snowflake could offer aggressive loss-leader pricing for a while. But nobody should make a major strategic bet on Snowflake’s offerings unless it shows it has a sustainable business model.
Categories: Other

Cloudera’s announcements this week

DBMS2 - Thu, 2014-10-16 09:05

This week being Hadoop World, Cloudera naturally put out a flurry of press releases. In anticipation, I put out a context-setting post last weekend. That said, the gist of the news seems to be:

  • Cloudera continued to improve various aspects of its product line, especially Impala with a Version 2.0. Good for them. One should always be making one’s products better.
  • Cloudera announced a variety of partnerships with companies one would think are opposed to it. Not all are Barney. I’m now hard-pressed to think of any sustainable-looking relationship advantage Hortonworks has left in the Unix/Linux world. (However, I haven’t heard a peep about any kind of Cloudera/Microsoft/Windows collaboration.)
  • Cloudera is getting more cloud-friendly, via a new product — Cloudera Director. Probably there are or will be some cloud-services partnerships as well.

Notes on Cloudera Director start:

  • It’s closed-source.
  • Code and support are included in any version of Cloudera Enterprise.
  • It’s a management tool. Indeed, Cloudera characterized it to me as a sort of manager of Cloudera Managers.

What I have not heard is any answer for the traditional performance challenge of Hadoop-in-the-cloud, which is:

  • Hadoop, like most analytic RDBMS, tightly couples processing and storage in a shared-nothing way.
  • Standard cloud architectures, however, decouple them, thus mooting a considerable fraction of Hadoop performance engineering.

Maybe that problem isn’t — or is no longer — as big a deal as I’ve been told.

Categories: Other

Context for Cloudera

DBMS2 - Mon, 2014-10-13 02:02

Hadoop World/Strata is this week, so of course my clients at Cloudera will have a bunch of announcements. Without front-running those, I think it might be interesting to review the current state of the Cloudera product line. Details may be found on the Cloudera product comparison page. Examining those details helps, I think, with understanding where Cloudera does and doesn’t place sales and marketing focus, which given Cloudera’s Hadoop market stature is in my opinion an interesting thing to analyze.

So far as I can tell (and there may be some errors in this, as Cloudera is not always accurate in explaining the fine details):

  • CDH (Cloudera Distribution … Hadoop) contains a lot of Apache open source code.
  • Cloudera has a much longer list of Apache projects that it thinks comprise “Core Hadoop” than, say, Hortonworks does.
    • Specifically, that list currently is: Hadoop, Flume, HCatalog, Hive, Hue, Mahout, Oozie, Pig, Sentry, Sqoop, Whirr, ZooKeeper.
    • In addition to those projects, CDH also includes HBase, Impala, Spark and Cloudera Search.
  • Cloudera Manager is closed-source code, much of which is free to use. (I.e., “free like beer” but not “free like speech”.)
  • Cloudera Navigator is closed-source code that you have to pay for (free trials and the like excepted).
  • Cloudera Express is Cloudera’s favorite free subscription offering. It combines CDH with the free part of Cloudera Manager. Note: Cloudera Express was previously called Cloudera Standard, and that terminology is still reflected in parts of Cloudera’s website.
  • Cloudera Enterprise is the umbrella name for Cloudera’s three favorite paid offerings.
  • Cloudera Enterprise Basic Edition contains:
    • All the code in CDH and Cloudera Manager, and I guess Accumulo code as well.
    • Commercial licenses for all that code.
    • A license key to use the entirety of Cloudera Manager, not just the free part.
    • Support for the “Core Hadoop” part of CDH.
    • Support for Cloudera Manager. Note: Cloudera is lazy about saying this explicitly, but it seems obvious.
    • The code for Cloudera Navigator, but that’s moot, as the corresponding license key for Cloudera Navigator is not part of the package.
  • Cloudera Enterprise Data Hub Edition contains:
    • Everything in Cloudera Basic Edition.
    • A license key for Cloudera Navigator.
    • Support for all of HBase, Accumulo, Impala, Spark, Cloudera Search and Cloudera Navigator.
  • Cloudera Enterprise Flex Edition contains everything in Cloudera Basic Edition, plus support for one of the extras in Data Hub Edition.

In analyzing all this, I’m focused on two particular aspects:

  • The “zero, one, many” system for defining the editions of Cloudera Enterprise.
  • The use of “Data Hub” as a general marketing term.

Given its role as a highly influential yet still small “platform” vendor in a competitive open source market, Cloudera even more than most vendors faces the dilemma:

  • Cloudera wants customers to adopt its views as to which Hadoop-related technologies they should use.
  • However, Cloudera doesn’t want to be in the position of trying to ram some particular unwanted package down a customer’s throat.

The Flex/Data Hub packaging fits great with that juggling act, because Cloudera — and hence also Cloudera salespeople — get paid exactly as much when customers pick 2 Flex options as when they use all 5-6. If you prefer Cassandra or MongoDB to HBase, Cloudera is fine with that. Ditto if you prefer CitusDB or Vertica or Teradata Hadapt to Impala. Thus Cloudera can avoid a lot of religious wars, even if it can’t entirely escape Hortonworks’ “More open source than thou” positioning.

Meanwhile, so far as I can tell, Cloudera currently bets on the “Enterprise Data Hub” as its core proposition, as evidenced by that term being baked into the name of Cloudera’s most comprehensive and expensive offering. Notes on the EDH start:

  • Cloudera also portrays “enterprise data hub” as an architectural/reference architecture concept.
  • “Enterprise data hub” doesn’t really mean anything very different from “data lake” + “data refinery”; Cloudera just thinks it sounds more important. Indeed, Cloudera claims that the other terms are dismissive or disparaging, at least in some usages.

Cloudera’s long-term dream is clearly to make Hadoop the central data platform for an enterprise, while RDBMS fill more niche (or of course also legacy) roles. I don’t think that will ever happen, because I don’t think there really will be one central data platform in the future, any more than there has been in the past. As I wrote last year on appliances, clusters and clouds,

Ceteris paribus, fewer clusters are better than more of them. But all things are not equal, and it’s not reasonable to try to reduce your clusters to one — not even if that one is administered with splendid efficiency by low-cost workers, in a low-cost building, drawing low-cost electric power, in a low-cost part of the world.

and earlier in the same post

… these are not persuasive reasons to put everything on a SINGLE cluster or cloud. They could as easily lead you to have your VMware cluster and your Exadata rack and your Hadoop cluster and your NoSQL cluster and your object storage OpenStack cluster — among others — all while participating in several different public clouds as well.

One system is not going to be optimal for all computing purposes.

Categories: Other

Upcoming Webinar Series: Using Google Search with your Oracle WebCenter or Liferay Portal

GSA Portal Search LogoFishbowl will host a series of webinars this month about integrating the Google Search Appliance with an Oracle WebCenter or Liferay Portal. Our new product, the GSA Portal Search Suite, fully exposes Google features within portals while also maintaining the existing look and feel.

The first webinar, “The Benefits of Google Search for your Oracle WebCenter or Liferay Portal”, will be held on Wednesday, October 15 from 12:00-1:00 PM CST. This webinar will focus on the benefits of using the Google Search Appliance, which has the best-in-class relevancy and impressive search features, such as spell check and document preview, that Google users are used to.

Register now

The second webinar, “Integrating the Google Search Appliance and Oracle WebCenter or Liferay Portal”, further explains how Fishbowl’s GSA Portal Search Suite helps improve the process of setting up a GSA with a WebCenter or Liferay Portal. This product uses configurable portlets so users can choose which Google features to enable and provides single sign-on between the portal and the GSA. The webinar will be held on Wednesday, October 22 from 12:00-1:00 PM CST.

Register now

For more information on the GSA Portal Search Suite, read our previous blog post on the topic.

The post Upcoming Webinar Series: Using Google Search with your Oracle WebCenter or Liferay Portal appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Fishbowl’s GSA Portal Search Suite introduces JSR-286 portlet integration that brings Google search to Oracle WebCenter and Liferay Portal

Integrated Google search has arrived for Oracle WebCenter and Liferay Portal. Last week, Fishbowl Solutions announced the GSA (Google Search Appliance) Portal Search Suite. This is Fishbowl’s fourth product for the Google Search Appliance, and introduces a productized integration that exposes Google search features like spelling suggestions, dynamic navigation, and document previews directly within the portal.

Previous integrations between the GSA and WebCenter or Liferay Portal had to be heavily customized to expose similar search features and functionality. In most cases, extensive customization was needed even when adding only one new search feature, such as autocomplete query suggestions, to portal search pages. Additionally, such customization had to be done by someone with specialized technical expertise including portal development, familiarity with the GSA response format, and XML transformation. Alternately some organizations have used the GSA’s built-in stylesheet typically directing users to search functions outside of the portal either as an iframe or a completely separate search page. This disconnect devalues the portal as being the single, universal location to access enterprise information, and detracts from the overall portal user experience.

Fishbowl’s GSA Portal Search Suite seamlessly integrates the GSA with WebCenter and Liferay portals. The integration is made possible by a collection of JSR-286 portlets that provide a search box and search results layout directly within the portal. These configurable portlets let customers choose which Google search features to expose, and lets them mix and match portlets for specific pages. The GSA Portal Search Suite also includes an authentication mechanism to provide single-sign-on between the portal and the GSA when performing secure searches. All these features help ensure that searches conducted from the portal return results with higher relevancy, and that search pages match the look and feel of the portal, leading to an enhanced user experience.

Customers with WebCenter or Liferay Portal that are looking to improve relevancy and provide search features that users have come to expect can do so with the GSA. And now with Fishbowl’s GSA Portal Search Suite, a seamless and flexible integration is available decreasing time to value and helping to maximize your WebCenter, Liferay and GSA investment.

Fishbowl will be demonstrating GSA Portal Search Suite, as well as our other GSA value-add products, at Oracle OpenWorld from September 29th through October 1st. You can see us in booth #2036 Moscone South. To read the brochure, click here.

GSA Portal Search Screen

 

The post Fishbowl’s GSA Portal Search Suite introduces JSR-286 portlet integration that brings Google search to Oracle WebCenter and Liferay Portal appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Meet Fishbowl’s WebCenter Experts at OpenWorld

Oracle OpenWorld will be held from September 28-October 2 in San Francisco.

Fishbowl Solutions will once again be at Oracle OpenWorld this year to connect with fellow WebCenter users! The event is now only a few days away, and our team is really looking forward to discussing how our value-add solutions can help your organization.

Our booth in the exhibition hall will be located at 2036 Moscone South, and will feature demos of Mobile ECM, the Google Search Appliance, Portal Solution Accelerator, SharePoint integration, and a free iPad giveway. We will also have many representatives on hand to answer your WebCenter content, portal, or imaging questions. All exhibition halls will be open from 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday, and from 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday.

Other activities at this year’s event include:

  • Sunday, September 28
    A Successful Oracle WebCenter Upgrade: What You Need to Know
    12:00 PM-12:45 PM, Moscone South 305This session’s speakers share facts and use cases that you will be able to apply to your Oracle WebCenter 11g upgrade. You will learn from tips and best practices from successful upgrades to Release 11g that you will be able to utilize as well. The session includes a fact-sharing discussion on upgrades; use case stories from Oracle WebCenter customers; and a roundtable forum during which attendees will be able to ask questions specific to their Oracle WebCenter Content, Oracle WebCenter Portal, or Oracle WebCenter Imaging upgrade.
  • Wednesday, October 1
    Automate Financial Processes for PeopleSoft and Oracle E-Business Suite
    12:45 PM-1:30 PM, Moscone West 3018This session’s speakers share facts and use cases that you will be able to apply to your Oracle WebCenter 11g upgrade. You will learn from tips and best practices from successful upgrades to Release 11g that you will be able to utilize as well. The session includes a fact-sharing discussion on upgrades; use case stories from Oracle WebCenter customers; and a roundtable forum during which attendees will be able to ask questions specific to their Oracle WebCenter Content, Oracle WebCenter Portal, or Oracle WebCenter Imaging upgrade.
  • Wednesday, October 1
    Oracle WebCenter for Education and Research
    2:00 PM-2:45 PM, Marriott Marquis Golden Gate C3Digital, social, and mobile technologies are creating new and transformational education experiences to engage students, faculty, parents, and administrators in their collective pursuit of student success. This session features case studies from higher education and K–12 that illustrate the power of Oracle WebCenter in enabling twenty-first-century learning.
  • Monday, September 29
    Oracle WebCenter and Oracle BPM Customer Appreciation Reception
    6:30 PM-8:30 PM, Old Mint, Old Mint PlazaRegister for the reception here.

If you’d like to meet with any of Fishbowl’s representatives at the event, feel free to email info@fishbowlsolutions.com. To learn more about what we’ll be doing at OpenWorld this year, download our Focus On guide. See you in San Francisco!

The post Meet Fishbowl’s WebCenter Experts at OpenWorld appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Webinar: 21st Century Education Goes Digital with Oracle WebCenter

Oracle Corporation Banner 21st Century Education Goes Digital with Oracle WebCenter

Learn how The Digital Campus with WebCenter can address top-of-mind issues for creating exceptional digital learning experiences, put content in context for the user and optimize business processes

The global education market is under-going a fundamental transformation — from the printed textbook and physical classroom to newer digital, online and mobile experiences.  Today, students can learn anywhere, anytime, from anyone on any device, bridging administrative and academic systems into single universal view.

Oracle WebCenter is at the center of innovation and engagement for any digital enterprise looking to empower exceptional experiences for students, faculty, administrators and researchers. It powerfully connects people, processes, and information with the most complete portfolio of portal, content management, Web experience management and collaboration technologies to enable student success.

Join this special event featuring the University of Pretoria, Fishbowl Solutions and Oracle, whose experts will illustrate successful design patterns and solution delivery for:

  • Student Portals. Create rich, interactive student experiences
  • Digital Repository. Deliver advanced content capture, tagging and sharing while securing enterprise data
  • Admissions. Leverage image capture and business process design to enable improved self-service

Attendees will benefit from the use-case insights and strategies of a world re-knowned university as well as a pre-built solution approach from Oracle and solutions partner Fishbowl to enable a truly modern digital campus.

Audio information:

Dial in Numbers: U.S / Canada: 877-698-7943 (toll free)
International: 706-679-0060(chargeable)
Passcode:
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Calendar Sep 11, 2014
10:00 AM PT |
01:00 PM ET

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The post Webinar: 21st Century Education Goes Digital with Oracle WebCenter appeared first on Fishbowl Solutions' C4 Blog.

Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other

Migrating Existing PeopleSoft Attachments into the Managed Attachments Solution

This post comes from Fishbowl’s Mark Heupel. Mark is an Oracle Webcenter consultant, and he has worked on a few different projects over the last year helping customers integrate WebCenter with Oracle E-Business Suite and PeopleSoft. One of WebCenter’s strengths is it provides these integrations out-of-the-box, including a document imaging integration to automate invoice processing with WebCenter’s capture, forms recognition and imaging capabilities, as well as workflows leveraging Oracle Business Process Management. Mark discusses WebCenter’s integration with PeopleSoft and its managed attachments solution below.

Application Integration

Oracle’s Managed Attachments solution enables business users in PeopleSoft to attach, scan, and retrieve document attachments stored in an Oracle WebCenter Content Server repository.

One of the issues that our clients face when moving to Oracle’s Managed Attachments solution is determining what to do with the attachments that already exist in PeopleSoft. We at Fishbowl have come up with a method to migrate these attachments into WebCenter Content in bulk while still maintaining the attachments’ context within PeopleSoft.

A high-level view of the solution is as follows. Queries are written on the PeopleSoft side to export each of the attachments, as well as a file containing each attachment’s metadata and PeopleSoft contextual information, to a network share. This is a task done by a PeopleSoft administrator. We then use our Enterprise Batchloader product to bulk load these files into WebCenter Content. We’ve written a customization that overrides the set of services that qualify for Managed Attachments to include our Enterprise Batchloader service. Since the context of the attachments is included in the metadata file, the Enterprise Batchloader check-ins work in the same way that a normal check-in from Managed Attachments would and the attachments retain their PeopleSoft context. Let’s get into the details of how this works.

Managed Attachments Overview

In order to understand the migration strategy, we first need to understand how Managed Attachments works under the covers. The important piece to know for this migration is that the table that stores the Managed Attachment object information on the WebCenter side is the AFObjects table. This table stores the PeopleSoft context information as well as the dDocName of each of the attachments currently being stored in WebCenter. Here is an example of what the AFObjects table looks like:

AFObjects Table

Each row in this table represents one PeopleSoft attachment being managed in WebCenter Content. The dAFApplication, dAFBusinessObjectType, and dAFBusinessObject fields make up the context for where the attachment is located in PeopleSoft. The dAFApplication field represents the application, the dAFObjectType field represents the page, and the dAFBusinessObject field is a pipe delimited list of the primary key values from the page where the attachment is located in PeopleSoft. The dDocName field is simply the dDocName of the content item in WebCenter.

When a user clicks the Managed Attachments link on the PeopleSoft screen a request is made over to WebCenter that contains the contextual page information from PeopleSoft (dAFApplication, dAFBusinessObjectType, and dAFBusinessObject). Using this contextual information, a query is then made against the AFObjects table to find the content IDs of the attachments that should be returned back to the user. A similar request is made when a user checks in a document through the Managed Attachments screen in PeopleSoft. The PeopleSoft context information is sent to WebCenter, the document is checked in, and then a row is inserted into the AFObjects table that contains the PeopleSoft contextual information as well as the dDocName of the newly checked-in document.

Loading Content into WebCenter

In order to be able to successfully load a large number of content items into WebCenter, while still maintaining the correct PeopleSoft context, we had to write a customization to hook into the existing Managed Attachments check-in functionality. The AppAdapterCore component, one of the two components installed on WebCenter for Managed Attachments, contains the core Managed Attachments code. This component contains a list of services such as CHECKIN_NEW that, when called with the PeopleSoft contextual information in the binder (dAFApplication, dAFObjectType, and dAFObject), executes the query that inserts a row into the AFObjects table. The customization that we wrote overrides the list of services specified in the AppAdapterCore component to include our Enterprise Batchloader check-in services. By doing so, we’re able to hook into the same insert query that Managed Attachments already uses, assuming we have placed the correct PeopleSoft context information in the binder.

Here is an example of what a standard Enterprise Batchloader blf (batch load file) would look like:

Batch Load File
As you can see, the file simply contains the action to take (insert), the location of the primary file, and the required metadata fields for WebCenter. In order to assign the correct PeopleSoft context we simply need to specify the dAFApplication, dAFObjectType, and dAFObject fields in the blf file:

Batch Load File 2

This effectively places each of those fields into the binder in WebCenter. When Enterprise Batchloader is run and performs its check-ins into WebCenter, the Managed Attachments functionality gets called and a row is inserted into the AFObjects table for each attachment that specifies the PeopleSoft context information. As long as the correct PeopleSoft contextual information is placed into the Enterprise Batchloader blf file, we’re able to bulk load as many attachments as needed into WebCenter while still retaining the correct PeopleSoft context information for use with the Managed Attachments solution.

I hope this provides you with an example of how your existing PeopleSoft Managed Attachments content could be migrated to WebCenter. After all, getting this content into WebCenter has many additional benefits, such as version control, renditions, retention management and the ability to surface this content to WebCenter-based mobile apps and portals. If you have questions or would like to engage with Fishbowl on such projects, please email info@fishbowlsolutions.com.

 

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Categories: Fusion Middleware, Other