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More Neu Vintage

iAdvise - Tue, 2014-03-11 21:42
Lets start with an apology, I'm sorry this post is so late. Having a hectic saturday craft fair, and spending the preceding week getting all my stock ready, I ran out of time to write my biweekly blog post. But on the upside - exhibiting last saturday, at the Handmade Vintage and Craft fair at Manchester Universities Student Union, gave me the inspiration for this post.So enjoy part deux of Neu Vintage, fresh from the pages of Folksy.These earrings from Love Ruby Red evoke memories of my Grandma's button box, that and they're so darn cute! Loving the heart shaped price stickers too.The perfect purse for a road trip - gives me a hankering to drive across America. Beautiful detail and quirky retro-ness from Workwise Textiles.Statement necklaces and ridiculously large beads are covering the high street right now for the autumn/winter season. So step away from the crowd and buy a handmade one-off from the lovely Chiyo.Cameo's are big this season too, but bet you've never seen a felt version before. The silver chain stitch round the edge really finishes these brooches off, get one quick from Zazar's Bazaar.I've recently learnt how to knit leaves, but IngridNation has come up with a very elegant solution of how to wear them - a classic corsage. Ingrid will also make you a custom corsage in a colour of your choosing.Get a kitchy fix - get a ceramic gummy bear pendant from Nifty Thrifty. Evocative of post school sweet shop visits and those mini packs of Haribo.Party season is rapidly approaching, go vintage this year and team a 50's style dress with this retro fascinator from Falcon. Or you could just wear it round the house when you need a bit of glamour.This Retro Mouse likes cheddar cheese, and how cute is the vintage flower fabric he's made from? Needs a good home, and cheese, from Needles and Buttons.Thanks to all the lovely sellers for being so creative, and thankyou to you for reading until the end. Not long now until its time for Christmas gift guides! But maybe some of these Neu Vintage items will make it on to your list?
Categories: APPS Blogs

Exclusive Gifts for Christmas

iAdvise - Tue, 2014-03-11 09:42
Welcome to the first of our seasonal gift guides here on , we've started early so you can plan early! I've selected my favourite luxury gifts for you to drool over and covet madly, although I would love for a few of these beauties to end up under someone's tree (preferable mine).So enjoy these high end picks from the lovely makers and crafts people of Folksy, and leave a comment at the end if you have a moment.First up this amazingly gorgeous Mulberry chair from Bonnie and Jackson, isn't it just the picture of Christmas by a log fire with the scent of pipe tobacco and pine cones?In at two, a very unique idea for elegant jewellery from I can't remember my grandma's name. I love how you get the plate the pieces came from included to use as a display/jewellery keeper.A silver family book pendant from Ali Bali Jewellery would make a very special gift for Mum or Grandma, and a wonderful heirloom too.I've been fascinated with the papier mache bowls of Amelia Green Heart ever since I saw them on the front page, a wonderful piece of contemporary art for the home.I can't help but think of The Magicians Nephew and Narnia when I see the stunning apple with insect from Silverfruit. I don't know how its made, but I like it a lot.Awkward mother-in-law? Got a big budget but not sure what to buy? Then this beaded lace mohair shawl from The Crafty Bride could be in answer. Incredibly delicate and detailed, yet light as a feather, this shawl can not fail to impress.How about some craft based art to cheer up his study? This oak picture with spring flowers from Jane Blease Design is a lovely cheery piece, with a great sense of craftsmanship and detail.Teenage niece or daughter to buy for? These luminous peacock bright feather earrings from Still Tree are just the ticket. Metallic and rich colours are so on trend from AW2010 and SS2011 dah-link!
Categories: APPS Blogs

I'll Put a Spell on You!

iAdvise - Mon, 2014-03-10 21:42
Halloween is here again! The spooky reminder of hearty Autumnal Feasts, and the precursor to the Christmas rush. This is a super-bumper-jam-packed edition of FoF, so if you don't mind I'm going to jump straight in.First of all, Halloween Jewellery;I found this shop a while ago, and I love their quirky gothic jewellery. This pumkin necklace is awesome, loving the black chain, from Antoninette Jewellery & Accessories.At only �4.00 this ghosty necklace is a real bargain from MustDestroyJewellery, don't forget to check out the other items in this shop - the cherry and rubix cube necklaces are amazing.Werewolves and Vampires, the eternal battle entwined in this superbly effective bat and full moon necklace from Ich Bin. Ich mag Ich Bin!Glitter, bats, resin, need I say more? This brooch pin from Cherryloco ticks all my Halloween boxes.Like many other people I've gone slightly Owl mad of late, and this ring from All.Beauteous.Things is just too cute.Zombies, another Halloween favourite. Join the Halloween Zombie March this year and wear a Zombie necklace from Finest Imaginary.I was a bit of a Lego fiend as a child, and the skeletons and treasure chests in my Lego castle were my prized possessions. Probably explains why I like this necklace from Ducky Charms Jewellery so much.and now to Halloween Plushies!;These finger puppets from MuNGBEANS look a little more happy than scary, but I love them all the same. Everyone needs a joyous Zombie every now and again.Itty Bitty Scary Pumpkin Kitty from theothermousie, I've already bought one of Sarah's Dr Strangebones kitties, and am very tempted to partake of this one too.Dem bones dem bones, and a super amazing Jeffery Sock Dog from Hotdog and Me. This one may look a little dead, but he'll chase a bone faster than you can say Bone Daddy.This zombie plushie from Tee Originals is a little misunderstood. He may get cravings for brains but jam covered spaghetti might just keep him satisfied.Stitcher Scribbler has a wonderful selection of Halloween pins and plushies, last few remaining, so snap them up quick if you want one!This knitted ghostie comes from Peggy's Knits, great for Halloween - but since he's so cute I'd leave him out all year.I think the Halloween Jeffery Sock Dog would enjoy chasing this bone around the garden. Get one now from Helen Jane's Designs.Who says the only option for female Halloween fancy dress is slutty or old witch? Glam it up 50's style with this fascinator from Lauren & Grace. Also available in silver.The Cotton Potter has hatched upon an ingenious idea, turn useful jars into something a little more beautiful. Naturally there's a Halloween version too;Phew! Bit of a marathon post this time! I hope you enjoyed, and thank you if you're still reading at the end. Thought and comments below, I know I love all these items - would love to know which are your favourites. And finally, have a Happy Halloween!
Categories: APPS Blogs

Quiet Release MySQL Plugin 12.1.0.1.2 — bug fixes

Alex Gorbachev - Tue, 2012-12-11 12:30
This is just a small bug fix release of the plugin. It was actually quietly released for a while now of if you have downloaded the plugin recently, you have the latest version. To be sure — check the version in the Console or you will see it in the file name. There are two [...]
Categories: APPS Blogs

IOUG Big Data SIG — Kick-off Meeting at OOW12

Alex Gorbachev - Thu, 2012-09-27 16:47
Announcing the IOUG Big Data Special Interest Group (SIG)! We have the SIG meeting at Oracle Open World — come join us with you morning coffee. Nothing better than starting your Big morning with Big Data talks! Yes — we actually managed to get the room at this busy times at OOW thanks to IOUG. [...]
Categories: APPS Blogs

IOUG Collaborate 2013 — Call for Speakers Informational Webinar

Alex Gorbachev - Tue, 2012-09-11 04:28
As I’ve become Director of Communities for IOUG recently, I’m intimately involved in many aspects of leading IOUG community. One of the area the user group is pursuing all the time is finding the new speakers and that takes some part of convincing the community members to actually start presenting. There are many of you [...]
Categories: APPS Blogs

Oracle OpenWorld 2012 – Bloggers Meetup

Alex Gorbachev - Thu, 2012-09-06 13:40
Oracle OpenWorld 2012 is just over a month away and yes we are organizing the Annual Oracle Bloggers Meetup — one of your top favorite events of the OpenWorld. What: Oracle Bloggers Meetup 2012 When: Wed, 3-Oct-2012, 5:30pm Where: Main Dining Room, Jillian’s Billiards @ Metreon, 101 Fourth Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 (street view). [...]
Categories: APPS Blogs

Announcing MySQL Plugin 12.1.0.1.0 for Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Cloud Control

Alex Gorbachev - Thu, 2012-08-30 12:00
MySQL management plugin for EM 12c has been long overdue. I’ve initially migrated the older plugin to EM 12c about 6 months ago and few dozen people received this as initial beta of the plugin. It worked OK but didn’t use any of the 12c new features and its home page was a bit of [...]
Categories: APPS Blogs

Advert: few Oracle Database Appliances at significant discount

Alex Gorbachev - Wed, 2012-08-29 16:19
This blog is a little bit self serving and I’d normally not post it but I think that it would be an awesome deal for those of you who are thinking of buying an Oracle Database Appliance now. We have several just two left brand new, unopened ODAs left in our inventory that we need [...]
Categories: APPS Blogs

How to Prevent Manual Entries to System Accounts

The Feature - Tue, 2012-08-07 23:21
There is a new feature in Oracle General Ledger R12 (12.1.3), which lets you define an additional qualifier called Third Party Control on your natural account values. You can set the Third Party Control qualifier for your accounts to be only used by Payables (Supplier) or Receivables (Customer), or prevent any manual entries (Restrict manual … Continue Reading
Categories: APPS Blogs

Two Newly Published White Papers for November 2011!

OracleContractors - Wed, 2011-11-16 03:45

Many thanks firstly to Ahmed Jassat, author of “Cloning from 20hrs to 20mins using Oracle Dataguard” & also to Alexander Reichman, author of “Interacting with BPEL/Workflow from Oracle Forms 11g”.

Ahmed is an Oracle Apps DBA based in South Africa & his White Paper focuses on a client site where he has worked & how implementing Oracle Dataguard has reduced the cloning time dramatically for them & the impact this has had on the business. A must-read for any DBA/Technical Managers, DBAs, Apps DBAs & disaster recovery teams.

Alexander is a certified Oracle DBA based in Canada & his White Paper focuses on integrating Oracle Forms 11g with Oracle BPEL/Workflow included in the Fusion Middleware 11g platform. A must-read for any Oracle Forms Developers, SOA Architects & Project Managers.

Many thanks for your contributions guys!

Categories: APPS Blogs

Is anyone actually using this database? - How to tell whether or not you can delete an old database

OracleContractors - Sat, 2011-08-27 04:07

When you log into a database server that has been running for several years, you will often find lots of files from databases that may not have been used for some time.

The people who created them probably left the company long ago and there is little documentation on the databases. Nobody is certain whether or not they are still being used, so they just sit around using up disk space.  If the databases are started up, then they’re also using memory, even though they may not be doing anything productive.

Rather than prolonging this situation, it’s a good idea to remove these databases - once you’ve confirmed that no-one uses them anymore.  Unfortunately, within a large business it may not be easy finding out who within the company is using which databases, if documentation has not been kept up to date.

As a starting point you can look in the following places:
(i) Database alert log
If the database is currently shut down, then what date was it shut down? If this was a long-time ago (i.e. more than 1 year), then the chances are that the database is no longer used, or is so out of date with current business data that it would need to be refreshed/updated before it could be of any use. 

Note: Just because things such as configuration changes (i.e. extending datafiles) are shown in the alert log, it doesn’t mean to say that it’s actually in use.  A DBA can carry out maintenance tasks on a database, whether or not there are any business users carrying out work.

Similarly, you may find that a backup tool such as RMAN regularly connects to the database.  This also doesn’t mean to say that the database is being used by the business - just that it’s being backed up.

(ii) Listener log
Search in the listener log for the last entries for that database. Even if the database is shutdown, this will let you know the last time that anyone was using it.  Be careful that you don’t think that someone is using the database just because there is an automated application process or reporting tool that connects to the database regularly.  If individual users are not connecting to the database, then it may not be in use anymore. 

Note: Double-check with any reports or application support teams as well, because the database may just be a repository, in which case individual user connections could be rare.

(iii) Datafile timestamps
If the database is shutdown, What is the last modified date shown in the filesystem for the datafiles?  I’ve come across situations where you can’t find any entries for the SID in the listener log and the alert log for the database has been removed, so this is a good way to find out when the database was last open.

Note: This is assuming that someone hasn’t just copied the files from another location, without preserving the original file timestamps.
(iv) Run AWR/ASH or Statspack reports
These will let you know if anyone has been using the database within the last week or longer - depending on the retention period configured for the database.  (If performance snapshots are not configured, then you may also find useful information on long-running transactions in V$SESSION_LONGOPS).

Note: Just because a database hasn’t been used in the last week, doesn’t mean to say it’s not required anymore.  It could be used for monthly, weekly or annual reporting, so you may not see regular activity.
 (v) Database Auditing
If database auditing has been enabled, it will give you an idea who has been accessing the database. (e.g. query views such as DBA_AUDIT_SESSION and DBA_AUDIT_TRAIL).
(vi) Standby databases
It’s worth running the query SELECT DATABASE_ROLE FROM V$DATABASE; If this returns “PHYSICAL STANDBY” or “LOGICAL STANDBY”, then it could mean that someone has deleted a primary database in the past, but neglected to remove the associated standby database. 
 

Before deleting any databases, it would be advisable to email anyone that may have an interest in the database and then ensure that a copy of the database files and configuration information is archived to tape or other storage for a pre-defined period of time.  Ensure that you have approval from all interested parties before carrying out any work like this, which could have an impact on the business.

Categories: APPS Blogs

Three New free of charge Oracle White Papers released for August!!!

OracleContractors - Mon, 2011-08-15 07:14

Hi all,

Many thanks to the following authors for their White Papers, your contributions are much appreciated & help to share Oracle knowledge on a global scale:

Martin Dvorak - “How to Plan & Deliver Oracle eBusiness Suite Training with UPK”

Claire Aukett - “Absence Management using R12 Oracle HCM & CRM”

Elwyn Lloyd Jones - “Upgrade Strategies for OWB Environments”

If you would like a copy of any of these papers, please register with the White Paper area of our website where you can gain access to our full White Paper library & if you are interested in becoming a White Paper author yourself, please contact me at: kirsten.campbell@oraclecontractors.com

New papers are also being released in September too so watch this space!

Categories: APPS Blogs

To OCP or not to OCP, that is the question

OracleContractors - Sat, 2011-08-13 03:09

Over the years, the topic of whether or not to take the Oracle Certified Professional (OCP) exams has been discussed many times. A large number of clients and agencies now regularly ask for candidates who are OCP qualified.

The main arguments against the exams seem to be along the following lines:

 

The exams only deal with theoretical situations. You can’t beat real-life experience. 
This is true, but the exams do demonstrate that you are able to understand technical issues.  In order to resolve problems, you need to know how the software works.  You also need real-life experience of using your theoretical knowledge in a practical manner, before you can become an effective DBA.

Outside of a test laboratory or classroom, you have real users, applications and software from multiple vendors. Once exposed to these environments you become a much better DBA.

 
The exam is just a memory test.
That’s true to some extent - but you have to understand the question and which of the possible answers is the correct one. You still have to understand what you’ve remembered.  Even though you may forget the exam topics over time, at least you have positive proof that at the time you took the exam, you knew that area of Oracle in detail.

 

I don’t need to take the exams to show that I keep up to date.
Whilst you can just read the documentation, at least the exams prove that you’ve made the effort to keep your skills current. Otherwise everyone else just has your word for it that you have.  

The other issue is that you can read the documentation but not understand it properly. Passing the exam is proof that you understood the concepts in sufficient depth to pass the exam.

Taking the exams also provides a more focused way of keeping up to date.

 

 
Why bother learning about lots of features that you’re never going to use?
There are lots of features that you may never use, but if a new problem arises - if you’ve kept up to date - then you’re are aware of all the possible solutions.  You don’t always have several days or hours to go away and research all the available options. Even having a high-level overview of a solution can mean that you not only resolve issues more quickly, but that you’re more likely to come up with the most effective solution.  If you aren’t aware of other solutions then you never will use them. You’ll just end up doing things the same way that they’ve been done for years.

Another reason for learning about many features is that unless you can predict the future, how do you know what features you will never use? 

Knowledge of lots of functionality is useful when resolving issues because more options that were once separate from the main database installation are now integrated into it. Sometimes these options can cause errors even though your application isn’t actually using them.

The exams also demonstrate that you’re interested enough in the technology to want to keep up to date. Nobody forces you to take them.

Whether or not you decide to take the exams is a personal choice, but I would say that they can be useful as a starting point to differentiate between two DBA’s who have a similar level of experience.  There is still no substitute for real-world experience and just because someone passes the exam doesn’t necessarily mean that they’ll be a better DBA. 

(In case you’re wondering, I have taken the exams!)

Categories: APPS Blogs

Tracing ODBC Connections to an Oracle Database

OracleContractors - Thu, 2011-08-04 23:06

Various applications can be configured to connect to an Oracle database using an ODBC connection. When there are problems with the connection, it can sometimes be useful to enable ODBC tracing. 

This is a pretty straightforward task and can often highlight useful information to diagnose issues such as incorrect ODBC drivers or driver versions, or attempting to use incorrect database connection information. 

The Scenario
————-
To demonstrate ODBC tracing, we’ll first log into an Oracle 11.2.0.1.0 Enterprise edition database called “ORCL11″ and create an account called “odbc1″:   

create user odbc1 identified by odbc1;

(Note: You may want to make your password more secure than this! Remember also that 11g has case-sensitive passwords by default)

grant create session, create table to odbc1;
alter user odbc1 default tablespace users;
alter user odbc1 quota 10M on users;

Next we’ll connect as our new user and create a test table with a small amount of data.

connect  odbc1/odbc1

create table odbc_test_tab (col1 varchar2(40));
insert into odbc_test_tab values (’TEST’);
insert into odbc_test_tab values (’TEST2′);
commit;


Then we create an ODBC connection to our ORCL11 database.  Create the connection using a System DSN called “EXCEL_TEST11″. Use the Oracle ODBC Driver 11.2.00.01 and the odbc1 database account to connect.

The last step is to create a new Excel 2010 spreadsheet called “odbctesting.xlsx” 

Note: To keep this post brief, I haven’t included full details of the steps to create the ODBC connection, or of setting up the connection in Excel. If anyone wants detailed instructions on how to do this, please let me know.  For the Excel connection the main steps are to go to the Data tab - “From Other Sources” - “From Data Connection Wizard” - “ODBC DSN” - Next and then select the “EXCEL_TEST11″ ODBC connection.  (Even though you’ll see a large listing of database objects, the ODBC1.ODBC_TEST_TAB is in the list - near the end. All the other objects are database views and tables to which PUBLIC - i.e. all users - have been  granted access).   Don’t select the option to save the password to the file.
 

Turning on tracing
——————
Next we’ll turn on ODBC tracing, so that we can see what’s happening when the connection is being made. From a Windows XP client, as you need to do is:

Start - control panel - Administrative Tools - Data Sources (ODBC)   (or you can go  Start - run - odbcad32)

Then: Go to the “Tracing” tab - Click on the “Start Tracing Now” button

Once you’ve clicked on the “Start Tracing Now” button, you’ll notice it will change to be a “Stop Tracing Now” button - Apply - OK.   This closes the ODBC Data Source Administrator.
Notes:
(i) To change the location of the logfile, click on the “Browse” button on the Tracing tab. You can also change the name of the log file. Then click Save.
(ii) Be aware, that this will turn on tracing for ALL ODBC connections running on this client.
(iii) Tracing could have a serious performance impact on your application, so only enable it if neccessary. 
(iv) Microsoft support article ID: 942976 notes that 64-bit versions of windows have two versions of the ODBC Administrator tool:

%systemdrive%\Windows\SysWoW64 folder.   - 32-bit version of Odbcad32.exe
%systemdrive%\windows\System32 folder.   - 64-bit version - also called Odbc32.exe

If running odbcad32 to edit 32-bit DSN’s, then specify the full path to the executable. 32-bit System DSN’s will only appear in the 32-bit version of odbc32.exe and 64-bit System DSN’s will only appear in the 64-bit version  of odbc32.exe.  However, be aware that User DSN’s will appear in both versions. Please refer to the Microsoft support note for more details.  
 

Viewing a successful connection
——————————-
To see a successful connection, we can open our spreadsheet and select the “Refresh All” option on the Data tab.
The ODBC tracing logfile contains a large amount of information. An extract is shown below. (I’ve added comments pre-fixed by “#”, but you obviously won’t see these in the logfile).


e               8fc-dd0 EXIT  SQLAllocConnect  with return code 0 (SQL_SUCCESS)   # successfully connected to the database.

  WCHAR *             0×03B9F460 [      37] “SELECT * FROM “ODBC1″.”ODBC_TEST_TAB”"  # select statement to run against our table.

e               8fc-dd0 EXIT  SQLDescribeColW  with return code 0 (SQL_SUCCESS) # Description of column data within the table follows
  …
  WCHAR *             0×0013FA20 [       4] “COL1″                # Column name

  SQLULEN *           0×024FEA68 (40)                             # Column length      

e               8fc-dd0 EXIT  SQLExecDirectW  with return code 0 (SQL_SUCCESS)  # Successfully executed SQL select statement

e               8fc-dd0 EXIT  SQLFetch  with return code 0 (SQL_SUCCESS) # Successful fetch of data from the first row in our table

e               8fc-dd0 EXIT  SQLFetch  with return code 0 (SQL_SUCCESS) # Successful fetch of data from the second row in our table

e               8fc-dd0 EXIT  SQLFetch  with return code 100 (SQL_NO_DATA_FOUND) # No more data to be fetched from the table - there are only 2 rows.

e               8fc-dd0 EXIT  SQLDisconnect  with return code 0 (SQL_SUCCESS)  #Disconnect from the database
 

Viewing an unsuccessful connection attempt due to an incorrect password
————————————————————————
Here we refresh our spreadsheet again, but deliberately use an incorrect password:

Excel error messages:

[Oracle][ODBC][Ora]ORA-01017:invalid username/password; logon denied
[Microsoft][ODBC Driver Manager] Driver’s SQLSetConnectAttr failed

ODBC Trace file error messages:

  DIAG [28000] [Oracle][ODBC][Ora]ORA-01017: invalid username/password; logon denied
 (1017)
  DIAG [IM006] [Microsoft][ODBC Driver Manager] Driver’s SQLSetConnectAttr failed (0)

 

Wrong Database Service name specified
————————————-
We refresh our connection, but put an incorrect entry in the “Service Name” box:

Excel error messages:

[Oracle][ODBC][Ora]ORA-12170: TNS:Connect timeout occurred
[Microsoft][ODBC Driver Manager] Driver’s SQLSetConnectAttr failed

ODBC Trace file error messages:
  DIAG [S1000] [Oracle][ODBC][Ora]ORA-12170: TNS:Connect timeout occurred (12170)
  DIAG [IM006] [Microsoft][ODBC Driver Manager] Driver’s SQLSetConnectAttr failed (0)

Listener is down
—————-
We shut down the listener and then refresh the spreadsheet. Excel error messages:

[Oracle][ODBC][Ora]ORA-12541: TNS:no listener

ODBC Trace file error messages:

DIAG [S1000] [Oracle][ODBC][Ora]ORA-12541: TNS:no listener (12541)
DIAG [IM006] [Microsoft][ODBC Driver Manager] Driver’s SQLSetConnectAttr failed (0)

 

 

Database is down
—————–
Startup the listener and shut down the 11g database. Refresh the Excel spreadsheet:
Excel error messages:

[Oracle][ODBC][Ora]ORA-12514: TNS:listener does not currently know of service requested in connect descriptor

ODBC Trace file error messages:

DIAG [S1000] [Oracle][ODBC][Ora]ORA-12514: TNS:listener does not currently know of service requested in connect descriptor (12514)
DIAG [IM006] [Microsoft][ODBC Driver Manager] Driver’s SQLSetConnectAttr failed (0)

Note: You might think, why bother tracing ODBC if you get the error messages in Excel anyway?  That’s fine, but the main purpose of this post is to illustrate that if you are using an application which doesn’t supply detailed messages, you may be able to find out the cause of any issues by turning on ODBC tracing.
 

 

Turning off ODBC Tracing
————————
To stop tracing, you can then just open up the ODBC Data Source Administrator as before - go to the “Tracing” tab and click on the “Stop Tracing Now” button - Apply - OK. 
Note: Don’t leave tracing turned on permanently, otherwise it could fill up the local drive on the client. ODBC tracing can generate a lot of information. Remember to delete or archive old trace files.

Other references:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/268591/EN-US

Categories: APPS Blogs

How big is my oracle database?

OracleContractors - Thu, 2011-07-28 14:50

People ask this question a lot on the internet and most of the answers just seem to focus on a query of dba_data_files, similar to that shown below:

Datafiles
select sum(bytes)/1048576 “DATAFILES_SIZE_MB” from dba_data_files;
That’s fine to start with, but you should also include tempfiles, which are used when an operation such as a large sort is too big to fit into the relevant memory allocated to the session.
Tempfiles
select sum(bytes)/1048576 “TEMPFILES_SIZE_MB” from dba_temp_files;
 

Your redo logs can also use up a large amount of disk space - especially if your database has more than the minimum number of 2 redo log groups. (You may also have several members within each group).
 

Redologs
select sum(bytes)/1048576 “REDOLOGS_SIZE_MB” from v$log;

The database obviously needs controlfiles to record information such as which datafiles belong to the database.  If your CONTROL_FILE_RECORD_KEEP_TIME is set to a large value, then your controlfiles can become quite large.

Controlfiles
select round(sum(block_size*file_size_blks)/1048576,2) “CONTROLFILESIZE_MB” from v$controlfile;

From 10g onwards, flashback database is not enabled by default, but if it is, then this area can grow rapidly over time. 

Flash Recovery Area
select * from v$recovery_file_dest; 
select * from v$flash_recovery_area_usage;  

These views will show sizing details and free space available. 

Note: If your backups are held outside of the flash recovery area, then you’ll also need to allow space for these. This will depend on your backup strategy and backup retention policy. (Export/datapump export dumpfiles also need to be planned for).

If you are using RMAN incremental backups and have block change tracking enabled, then include this file:

Block change tracking file
select filename, nvl(bytes/1048576,0) “BLOCK_CT_SIZE_MB” from v$block_change_tracking;
 

Files referenced by database directories or the utl_file_dir parameter
Your application may read from, or write to external files via database directories or the utl_file_dir parameter.

Other examples of using external directories are for

(a) External tables -

select a.owner||’.'||a.table_name||’ stored in directory ‘||b.directory_path “EXTERNAL_TABLES”
from
dba_external_locations a, dba_directories b
where a.directory_owner=b.owner
and a.directory_name=b.directory_name;
(b) If you are storing multiple versions of the same tablespace within a file group repository. (i.e. tablespace versioning).

select a.tablespace_name, a.version, a.file_group_owner, a.file_group_name,
b.file_name, b.file_directory
from dba_file_group_tablespaces a, dba_file_group_files b
where a.file_group_owner=b.file_group_owner
and a.file_group_name=b.file_group_name;
 

Miscellaneous files
There are a large number of files which you could also include in your sizing if you wanted to. Though most of these are really external to the database.
Examples include:

(a) The spfile/pfile and any ifile referenced files.
(b) Any external scheduler jobs (i.e. program_type=’EXECUTABLE’ and program_action which points to a shell script).
(c) Configuration files such as Oracle wallet files and database gateway/hs services files.                   

(d) Oracle networking files. (e.g. tnsnames.ora, sqlnet.ora, listener.ora)
(e) Passwordfile.
(f) Any application code that needs to be deployed to the database server.
(g) Any database management or monitoring scripts that need to be on the server. 
(h) Files referenced by the audit_file_dest parameter, if audit_trail is set to use the “OS” or “XML” options.
(i) Archived redo logs and standby redo logs. Be aware of space usage related to the workload of your database and whether or not you have multiple destinations defined.
(j) Any software that needs to be deployed to the server. (e.g. The oracle software itself takes up several gigabytes of space).

If you wanted to be very precise, you could remove unused space from the calculations above, but I haven’t done that here, in order to keep things more straightforward. In real-life you would probably be better leaving the extra space available to allow for future growth of the database - which you should also plan into your size calculations.

As you can see, calculating size requirements for an Oracle database is not always as simple as you would think.  I’ve tried to include all elements in this post, though in reality a lot of them won’t apply to most databases. Please feel free to share any other items not on the list, that you feel should be included.

Categories: APPS Blogs

EBS Technology Stack Blog in transition

Steven Chan - Wed, 2011-03-16 10:17
I started this blog in 2006 as a personal experiment. Since then, this blog has morphed into a combination of a breaking news source and a wide-ranging reference library. Over the years, I've deliberately established an editorial policy of ensuring that we break EBS techstack news to you in real-time, free of hype and unvarnished by marketing considerations. It now includes contributions from almost thirty guest authors. We've collectively published about 800 articles, fielded over 5,200 comments, and handled countless emails from readers. We get millions of pageviews per year, and there are over a million incoming links to our published articles. This blog's success has been an object lesson in how a small, personal experiment can take on a life of its own. I still manage this blog in my free time, mostly, but it now lives in an odd grey area somewhere between my official job responsibilities and a personal project. Things are about to change I fully understand the importance of this site to you. Unfortunately, there are major changes underway that will dramatically affect this blog. I am working with our executive management team to investigate options for preserving both our ability to get breaking news to you as well as preserving the reference library functions that you've come to rely upon. In the meantime, I'm saddened to report that this blog is on hiatus. We won't be publishing new articles or announcements. Comments have been frozen. This is temporary, but I don't have a date yet when we'll get back into our normal swing of things. Stay tuned. I'll post more updates here as soon as possible. Regards, Steven Chan Chief Editor Steven Chan http://blogs.oracle.com/stevenChan/about.html
Categories: APPS Blogs

Oracle E-Business Suite Plug-in 4.0 Released for OEM 11g (11.1.0.1)

Steven Chan - Fri, 2011-02-25 11:01
We're very pleased to announce the release of Oracle E-Business Suite Plug-in 4.0, an integral part of Application Management Suite for Oracle E-Business Suite. ams-ebs.png The management suite combines features in the standalone Application Management Pack (AMP) for Oracle E-Business Suite and Application Change Management Pack (ACMP) for Oracle E-Business Suite with Oracle's real user monitoring and configuration management capabilities. The features that were available in the standalone management packs are now packaged into the Oracle E-Business Suite Plug-in 4.0, which is now fully certified with Oracle Enterprise Manager 11g Grid Control. This latest plug-in extends Grid Control with E-Business Suite specific management capabilities and features enhanced change management support. The Oracle E-Business Suite Plug-in is released via patch 8333939. For the AMP and ACMP installation guide, see: * Getting Started with Oracle E-Business Suite Plug-in Release 4.0 (Note 1224313.1) Steven Chan http://blogs.oracle.com/stevenChan/about.html
Categories: APPS Blogs

New Oracle E-Business Suite R12 OS and Tools Requirements on IBM AIX on Power Systems

Steven Chan - Thu, 2011-02-24 13:08
IBM has announced May 1st, 2011 as the end of Support for Version 8 of the IBM XL C/C++ compiler currently used for Release 12 builds and patching. The target date of the switchover -- May 1st 2011 -- corresponds to when this older compiler will no longer be supported by IBM. Beginning on May 1st 2011, Oracle E-Business Suite patches for Release 12 (12.0, 12.1) on the IBM AIX on Power Systems platform will be built with Version 9 of the IBM XL C/C++ compiler. Customers who plan to patch or upgrade their E-Business Suite R12 environments after May 1st, 2011 must meet all the new requirements prior to applying new patches or upgrades. John Abraham
Categories: APPS Blogs

Windows 7 Service Pack 1 Certified with E-Business Suite

Steven Chan - Wed, 2011-02-23 12:25
There are three possible configurations for Windows 7 desktop clients: 1. 32-bit Windows 7, 32-bit browsers, 32-bit JRE 2. 64-bit Windows 7, 32-bit browsers, 32-bit JRE 3. 64-bit Windows 7, 64-bit browsers, 64-bit JRE We certified the first configuration in December 2009: E-Business Suite with 32-bit Windows 7 desktop clients running 32-bit versions of Internet Explorer (IE) and Firefox with the 32-bit JRE. We certified the second configuration in September 2010: E-Business Suite with 64-bit Windows 7 desktop clients running 32-bit versions of IE and Firefox with the 32-bit JRE. I'm pleased to announce that Microsoft Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1) is now certified with both of those configurations for Oracle E-Business Suite 11i and Oracle E-Business Suite R12 with the following minimum requirements: Steven Chan http://blogs.oracle.com/stevenChan/about.html
Categories: APPS Blogs